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Author Topic: Replacing line cord, something weird happening  (Read 548 times)
N5HEG
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Posts: 16




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« on: May 30, 2005, 06:26:11 AM »

National NC-88 general coverage receiver; replaced original non-polarized two-prong line cord/plug with 3-wire cord and integral plug.  Brown (hot)/narrow blade to on/off switch/volume control on NC88.  Blue (neutral) to original second line (goes to power xfmr, etc.), and green to chassis.  

Powered up and nothing worked!  Any help appreciated.  Thanks, Mike
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KA5N
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Posts: 4380




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« Reply #1 on: May 30, 2005, 12:21:16 PM »

Was it working before you replaced the cord?  Unplug from AC and check continuity (with a VOM or DVM) of power cord (each wire). Plug in and check to see if you have ~120 VAC at the end of the power cord and check to see if the switch works.  Check your solder joints and make sure you have indeed connected all the wires on the tie strip (or whatever connection is used).  In electronics it takes only an instant for something to fail.  
I suspect either the power cord is defective or your connections are bad.  Power transformers can open but often they fail by shorting out.  With old equipment anything can happen.  If there is a fuse, did you check it?
Allen
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WB2WIK
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« Reply #2 on: May 31, 2005, 01:01:38 PM »

Are you sure about the "blue" and "brown" connections?  Maybe they're reversed.

The standard for power cords is black = phase; white = neutral; green/yellow stripe = ground.  Blue and black aren't standard colors, so I wouldn't presume anything about their function unless I measured it.

WB2WIK/6
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WB2WIK
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« Reply #3 on: May 31, 2005, 01:02:21 PM »

Blue and black aren't standard colors,


Oops, I didn't mean "blue and black!"  I meant blue and brown....

Black is a standard color.
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KE4DRN
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Posts: 3721




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« Reply #4 on: May 31, 2005, 08:44:18 PM »

hi steve,

I also swapped out an old line cord with one of those  IEC brown/blue/green line cords.  Not sure where they get their wire from but they did have ul/csa markings.

The cords I used came from used laser printers.

Thought my eyes were going bad !


73 james
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KA0GKT
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Posts: 555




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« Reply #5 on: June 01, 2005, 06:54:58 PM »

The brown/blue/green colors are European standard.

IIRC, Blue is common, Brown is hot and Green and/or Yellow is ground.

I suggest that you verify this with an ohm meter.

73 DE KA0GKT/7
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W9GB
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Posts: 2611




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« Reply #6 on: June 04, 2005, 06:49:43 AM »

Steve -

Actually, BROWN, BLUE and GREEN or Green w/Yellow tracer is EUROPEAN STANDARD for line cords (I come across these regularly) -
While the traditional US standard has been BLACK, WHITE, GREEN.

You have to be VERY CAREFUL in replacing line cords on old "All American Five"(AA5) radios that have no transformer (AC/DC operation) OR some tube receivers in the WW2 - 1970 era.
Some of these radios have a hot chassis and were switching the neutral line lead (Knight Star Roamer; Hallicrafters S38 series, others).  Get a schematic!  Also if you are doing this upgrade replace the line capacitors with X2 or Y2 safety capacitors - Just Radios have these available.
http://www.justradios.com/X2capacitors.html
http://www.justradios.com/Y2capacitors.html

The USENET group: rec.antiques.radio+phone
regularly deals with these questions for tube radio restorers.

w9gb
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W9GB
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Posts: 2611




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« Reply #7 on: June 04, 2005, 07:02:43 AM »

Follow-up:

For North America, we have been use to the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) standards for electrical connections.  The International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) has set standards for Europe [to unite various standards and conventions in Eastern and Western Europe]

Many US based electrical firms are NOW recommending power cords that incorporate the IEC Brown, Blue and Green/Yellow conductor color coding in place of the traditional North American (NEMA) Black, White, Green conductor color coding. (This is to standardize US products for broader acceptance in export market)

Wiring various country specific power cords to equipment before export, including shipment to the U.S., is simplified when standardizing on the IEC color coding system.

Both the U.S. and Canadian National Electrical Codes (NEC), as well as UL and CSA standards, ALLOW the usage of the IEC Brown, Blue, and Green/Yellow conductor color coding.

NOTE: We are talking about power or line cords for "equipment" - this does NOT change standard electrical wiring in North America.  Consult the latest 2005 NEC Handbook for additonal details or questions.

Greg
w9gb
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