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Author Topic: Splicing HF dipole wires  (Read 580 times)
K8POS
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« on: July 11, 2009, 06:27:41 AM »

I need to lengthen on of my dipole wires.
What is the best splice to use for #12 THN stranded wire?

I was figuring on using a "Western Union or Bell type splice.  The splice needs to be strong.

Bob
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WB5JEO
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« Reply #1 on: July 11, 2009, 06:36:14 AM »

I think that splice loses a lot of it's virtue with stranded wire. How about the Signal Corps field wire technique.

http://www.hardscrabblefarm.com/ww2/field_wire_splice.htm
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KC4GS
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« Reply #2 on: July 11, 2009, 06:44:27 AM »

I have spliced mine many time, to make longer or repair breaks.  Strip back some insulation, properly twist both over each other, tightly, then solder, tape and brush liquid tape over them. Keeps water out, and are plenty strong.
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N4CR
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« Reply #3 on: July 11, 2009, 06:54:22 AM »

What you want is called the "Western Union" splice.

And, here is a vintage document to go along with the true age of this splice.

http://www.markhellerelectric.com/solder.pdf
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73 de N4CR, Phil

We are Coulomb of Borg. Resistance is futile. Voltage, on the other hand, has potential.
N5LRZ
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« Reply #4 on: July 11, 2009, 06:57:26 AM »

I will add only one thing to GS statement...

When soldering make sure that the solder flows evenly and smoothly over the wrapping and not in clumps.  A very large soldering gun or soldering iron will be required.
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W4VR
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« Reply #5 on: July 11, 2009, 08:40:50 AM »

I use the same method as kc4gs.  When working outside I use a self-igniting blow torch with low flame for soldering.  I've never had a problem with the splice pulling apart.
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KT8K
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« Reply #6 on: July 11, 2009, 09:15:31 AM »

After having some solder joints weather away to a whitish powder in just a couple of years, I switched to wire nuts.  No problems since, but I don't put them under tension.  They're quick, easy, and seem effective - they've been up for a couple of years.
Best rx & 73 de kt8k - Tim
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G3RZP
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« Reply #7 on: July 11, 2009, 11:11:13 AM »

I find that unprotected tin-lead solder goes crystalline after a few years. Maybe well protected is OK - I've never managed to prtoect it well enough. I use solid hard drawn copper, and do splices by the usual set of twists each side, then use high temperature hard solder and blow torch. OK, it anneals the hard drawn copper in the vicinity of the joint, but it's not usually a probelm.
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VE3GNU
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« Reply #8 on: July 11, 2009, 12:39:06 PM »

KT8K---pardon me for asking---What exactly are "wire nuts"?  Thanks.
Ernie
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AC0LK
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« Reply #9 on: July 11, 2009, 03:54:14 PM »

WB5JEO, thanks for the link to the Signal Corps splice. Having spliced thousands (tens of thousands, probably, but I don't want to think about it that hard) of all sorts of wires and cables, I'm a connoisseur, and that technique is a beauty.
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K8POS
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« Reply #10 on: July 11, 2009, 06:52:37 PM »

I used a western Union Splice.  Was kinda planning on that type any way.
Love the link to the method to make one, helped to refresh my mind.
I think the wire will break before that joint does.
As for weather proofing, one layer of heat shrink, followed by some aquarium sealant, followed by another layer of heat shrink.
Thanks all

Bob
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K4DPK
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« Reply #11 on: July 11, 2009, 10:34:59 PM »

Hmmmm....

What I've been doing for a pretty good while is peeling the insulation back for about three inches on each wire, wrapping each one around the other and soldering it.  Never had this fail me yet.

Phil C. Sr.
k4dpk
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K4JSR
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« Reply #12 on: July 12, 2009, 05:21:00 AM »

This thread has shown me that variety is the splice of life!

73,  Cal  K4JSR
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N4JTE
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« Reply #13 on: July 12, 2009, 02:50:28 PM »

Wow, I just tie them together in a knot; twist and tape.
Regards,
Bob
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KC4GS
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Posts: 46




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« Reply #14 on: July 13, 2009, 04:19:41 AM »

Wire nuts are plastic coated devices that electricians use when wiring buildings.  They come in various sizes ans for various number of wires and size of wires. Seem to work OK, but I do not think they will take much strain. Go by local hardware storeand they should be able to show you some.
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