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Author Topic: How to repair cable outer jacket?  (Read 1278 times)
N4KYW
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« on: July 15, 2009, 10:32:22 AM »

I have a nice 50-foot ethernet cable. Recently this cable was mauled by an overzealous clening lady, so the outer jacket is frayed or broken at several locations.
Since this cable has molded RJ-45s at the ends I cannot slip on heat-shrink tubing to repair the outer jacket. So what would be a good alternative way to repair the cable?
Thx.
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AD5X
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« Reply #1 on: July 15, 2009, 10:49:58 AM »

Liquid Electrical Tape works great for this, weatherproofing connectors, etc.  Get it at Lowes, Home Depot, etc.

Phil - AD5X
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AC5UP
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« Reply #2 on: July 15, 2009, 11:36:48 AM »

If the damaged portions of the cable are indoors and the braid appears to be intact, it doesn't need an elaborate repair... A wrapping of Scotch 33 should be plenty.

This assumes the coax is still mostly round and hasn't been crunched to the point where the center conductor may short to the braid or develop an impedance bump.

Otherwise, I'd replace it so I don't have to wonder about it.
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AC5UP
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« Reply #3 on: July 15, 2009, 12:07:56 PM »

Ooops... Was thinking RG-58 Ethernet (cheapernet) instead of CAT-5 twisted pair Ethernet.

Nevermind.

If the cable still works, it ain't broken... Wink
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WB2LCW
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« Reply #4 on: July 15, 2009, 12:43:35 PM »

I dont know how many inches are frayed! If the coax is outside you can use Fusion tape then coat with black liquid tape. They sell Fusion tape at Radio shack(it is red colored)! If the coax is indoor only use the scotch 33 or the liquid tape.

You can also use that liquid for insulating tool handles.
They sell that at home depot also!
73

mike
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W9PMZ
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« Reply #5 on: July 15, 2009, 12:56:03 PM »

if you can afford a cleaning lady, go buy another cable, they are cheap.......

73,

Carl - W9PMZ
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N0YXB
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« Reply #6 on: July 15, 2009, 01:14:23 PM »

Perhaps repairing instead of replacing things is why he can afford a cleaning lady.
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N5LRZ
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« Reply #7 on: July 15, 2009, 01:54:28 PM »

I recently read in QST the following on the tips section....

To seal a connection you can use that heavy duty plastic wrap--the kind used by magazine companies to protect their magazine in the mail.  Cut the heavy duty plastic into strips and wrap overlapping each wrap.   Wrap one or two layers as such....

THEN using a hot object such as the barrel of a soldering iron rub the plastic wraps very quickly back and forth so as to MELT the plastic together.  Be careful not to BURN the plastic though.

It may not be pretty but it works.

ANOTHER way I sometimes use is to get a large straw and fit it over the connection I want to protect.  I then fill the straw with hot glue.  SEALED connection.
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N5LRZ
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« Reply #8 on: July 15, 2009, 01:54:36 PM »

I recently read in QST the following on the tips section....

To seal a connection you can use that heavy duty plastic wrap--the kind used by magazine companies to protect their magazine in the mail.  Cut the heavy duty plastic into strips and wrap overlapping each wrap.   Wrap one or two layers as such....

THEN using a hot object such as the barrel of a soldering iron rub the plastic wraps very quickly back and forth so as to MELT the plastic together.  Be careful not to BURN the plastic though.

It may not be pretty but it works.

ANOTHER way I sometimes use is to get a large straw and fit it over the connection I want to protect.  I then fill the straw with hot glue.  SEALED connection.
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W9PMZ
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« Reply #9 on: July 15, 2009, 04:47:51 PM »

"Perhaps repairing instead of replacing things is why he can afford a cleaning lady."

non sequitir

If he can afford a cleaning lady then he knows the value of a dollar and the worth of his time.  The time spent to get the materials to fix the cable and the effort required to actually fix the cable and then the potential latent defects far exceeds the expenditure of $5 for a new cable.

73,

Carl - W9PMZ
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W0BTU
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« Reply #10 on: July 15, 2009, 08:25:05 PM »

"Since this cable has molded RJ-45s at the ends I cannot slip on heat-shrink tubing to repair the outer jacket."


I have found a way around this by stretching irradiated polyolefin (not PVC) heat shrink tubing (such as Alpha FIT-221V) so that it can be slipped over a connector on the end of a cable.

A suitably-sized pair of needle nose pliers is all you need. Just slip a piece of 3/8  heat shrink tubing over the end, and pull the handles apart to stretch the tubing to a larger size. Turn the tubing 90 degrees and repeat, until it is big enough to slip over the RJ-45. It should shrink down small enough to cover the cable.

Works for me.


73 Mike
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KD8GEH
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« Reply #11 on: July 15, 2009, 10:02:27 PM »

Agreed,

A 3-1 or 4-1 alpha or raychem heat shrink works well with the adhesive lined jacket.  Theres a mil spec version as well.  Email me if you need more data at (my call) at arrl.net

73 De Dave KD8GEH
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WA3SKN
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« Reply #12 on: July 16, 2009, 05:11:56 AM »

If only the outer jacket is damaged, electrical tape will do.
If the wire pairs are bad, you will only need the orange and green pair to be working for LAN use.  You can cut and add RJ45 style connectors, but it will probably be easier to just replace the cable if you do not already have the required tools.
If the wire is REALLY mangled, just replace the cable... they are not too expensive.
73s.

-Mike.
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W4VR
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« Reply #13 on: July 16, 2009, 02:20:26 PM »

Don't screw around with that cable...buy a new one!
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KB9CRY
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« Reply #14 on: July 16, 2009, 03:35:51 PM »

Scotch 33
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