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Author Topic: Wire hookup to Power Supply  (Read 526 times)
K1KIK
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Posts: 12




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« on: August 23, 2009, 08:41:24 AM »

I am connecting my FT-950 to a Yaesu FP-1030A power supply.  I am not sure about how the wires hook onto the power supply.  Do I wrap the bare ends around the posts on the power supply, then just tighten the knobs or is there some way of doing it where the wires are not exposed?  Thanks.
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KB4MUV
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Posts: 39




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« Reply #1 on: August 23, 2009, 09:53:23 AM »

I would go to the auto parts store and pick up some crimp on connectors that would fit the post on the power supply.  And you also need to check to make sure it fits your wire size.  The connectors look like rings that fit the posts.  Crimp the connector on the wire, slip on the post, and then tighten down the nut or knob.  Not as likely to come off as just tightening down on the bare wire.  If you need it, send me an email address and I will take a pic of the way it attaches to my Astron power supply...  Sometimes a pic is worth a thousand words.
Ken
KB4MUV
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K7AAT
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Posts: 414




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« Reply #2 on: August 23, 2009, 11:30:39 AM »

Yes,  that's the way to go... but if you do not have a proper crimp tool for those connectors, don't try to do it with pliers.  Either borrow one from someone, or you can probably get away with a good solder connection for the crimp connectors.

  Ed   K7AAT
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KB4MUV
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« Reply #3 on: August 23, 2009, 11:45:09 AM »

Yes Ed is right...  Don't try to cut corners....  Soldering is good.  (In fact I may trust a good solder joint before a crimp joint.  But either is good.) I think you can get crimping tools at the auto supply stores or even places like Lowe's or Home Depot...  They're usually not very expensive.  If you have never done crimping before, get you some extra connectors and practice.  And trust me, it will not be the last time you have a use for them...  Ha!  Ha!  Because one day you will be like the rest of us...  Saying, "I keep getting more stuff and I can't stop!"  
Ken
KB4MUV
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K1CJS
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Posts: 5998




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« Reply #4 on: August 23, 2009, 12:09:21 PM »

Never trust a simple solder joint OVER a crimp joint--the solder may soften and pull out of the connector--or just drop apart if a wire to wire connection.

ALWAYS make a good mechanical connection--for example, by crimping--BEFORE soldering.  The same goes for wire to wire or wire to terminal connections.  ALWAYS make a good mechanical connection BEFORE soldering.
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K5LXP
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« Reply #5 on: August 23, 2009, 02:22:34 PM »

Soldering a crimped connection can actually compromise it, as the solder will wick up the wire and create a situation where mechanical fatigue and failure will occur.  Because a proper crimped connection is as every bit as good as a soldered one, there's no reason to do both.  Buy a nice crimp tool and you're set.  Soldering can cause other issues like melted insulation, contamination of the contact area from solder wicking, and is generally less convenient than crimping.

Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM
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WY3X
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Posts: 768




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« Reply #6 on: August 23, 2009, 02:50:02 PM »

I have seen crimped connections fail. I've never seen a "properly" soldered connection fail. I solder either rings or hooks on the end of every power wire I have. I haven't had a soldered power cable failure in the 18 years I've been a ham. We have high humidity and high salt content in the air here at the beach. (YES, we get salt in the air here! That's why our car bodies are shorter-lived here than up north where they salt the roads in the winter. We have salt in the air 24/7/365!) Crimped connections are not worth a flip in our environment. If you're in the desert where folks don't get much hidden corrosion, I can see going gaga for crimping and leaving the solder alone. Even Elecraft recommends soldering their "Power Pole" connectors. The main caveat is if you're not good at soldering, don't do it!

73, -KR4WM
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AA4PB
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Posts: 12784




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« Reply #7 on: August 23, 2009, 05:01:29 PM »

The general rule is that solder should never be counted on for the mechanical connection. If you want to solder to provide a better electrical connection then it should be crimped first to provide good mechanical support.

It is often best NOT to solder a crimp connection because the solder can wick up the stranded wire inside the insulation. If the wire flexes at the connector then it can break if all the strands are soldered together.

The problem with many Power Pole connections is that people don't use the proper crimp tool for them.
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K1KIK
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Posts: 12




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« Reply #8 on: August 23, 2009, 05:27:19 PM »

Thank you all for the advice.  I'll get a crimping tool and some connectors.
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