AIRCRAFT HF

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John:
A few minor things....
1) The original post, that I was responding to, was inquiring about HF Aviation Ground Station equipment, not aircraft HF equipment...
And, I assumed (perhaps in error) that he was involved in his company's management, and as such does have company/corporate authority for a "dual-use" station, and was simply trying to find info on dual use transceivers.....

2) Terry, W0FM,  without seeing the video myself, I cannot be 100% sure, but I suspect it was an Icom IC-78.....
Yes, an IC-78.....not 718, nor 7800.....
(Or possibly an aviation-programmed M-700, M-710, or M-802...)

3) Terry, W0FM, for aircraft in flight, using HF Comms (such as when on trans-oceanic routes),
I believe FAA regs, as well as international air regs (and probably company/corporate rules also), specify that the primary HF Comms be set at whatever freq is their "primary" (such as 5598 khz, etc.) and their SelCal be programmed to un-squelch when directed by ground station command (oceanic / international ATC)...
Further, they are informed of their secondary freq, by their ground station in contact.....
This "secondary" freq. is typically set in their "secondary" HF Comms system....
BUT, many flying hams, will tune their secondary HF Comm system to an amateur freq and work some "dx".....
BUT, they are always required to maintain radio watch (SelCal squelched, is accepted as a radio watch) on their primary HF Comm freq.....

4) I forgot about JRC.....they also make type certified HF transceivers, which are available here in the US.....
Not sure if Thrane and Thrane, Coden, etc. are widely available here in the US or not....but they also make "type Certified" HF transceivers.....
(there are others, such as Aerocom, Cubic, Intech, etc. in addition to Harris and Rockwell/Collins that I mentioned earlier......all of which are currently in use on HF Aviation circuits....)

Lee, I hope I've given enough choices of equipment to look at.....probably almost a dozen choices, just don't pick a ham rig.....

I hope I've helped clarify things a bit....

Now as far as the G5RV.......  hi, hi....

73,
John,  KA4WJA

Ron Grandmaison:
You will have to buy a transceiver that is specially designed for aircraft HF operation.  Different equipment technical standards apply to operation onboard an aircraft.

John:
Duh....I thought I wrote this first thing, but guess I didn't.....

Sunair.....

Sunair is just down the road from me, and I know some of their guys.....
They make LOTS of great HF stuff, including type certified HF transceivers....SelCal units.....HF Comm eauipment for ATC, etc.....

www.sunairholdingsllc.com  

Sorry I didn't post this first....
Guess it was one of those "senior moments"...

73,
John,  KA4WJA

Allen C. Ward:
It seems that the less a thread has to do with amateur radio, the longer it is.  Or is it the other way around?
Allen

Tom Rum:
I've been a corporate pilot for the last 30 years or so and have operated HF aeronautical mobile on the HAM Bands on a regular basis during that time..I've also made numerous Trans Atlantic Flights and operating on the HF Aeronautical frequencies. I'll give you a quick HF Aeronautical primer...

The primary use for HF aeronautical frequencies are for routes over water, out of VHF range....The most popular being the North Atlantic tracks. Gander Control on the Canadian side and Prestwick Control on the UK side. Aircraft are given a primary and secondary HF frequency on ("coast out"), when approximately 200 mile from the coast, VHF coverage drops out and you then make position reports on HF frequencies. These reports are made until 200 miles from the opposite coast where once again ("coast in")the aircraft is in VHF range and communications are switched from HF back to VHF.

Upon initial contact with the appropriate HF control facility a SelCal (Selective Calling) "CHECK" is made using a four letter identifier assigned to the aircraft. A confirmation from the cockpit stating "Roger on the SelCal Check", affirms the control center that the aircraft has a properly operating SelCal receiver. The volume on the HF radio can then be turned down.  The SelCal unit is an independent receiver and not connected to the aircraft's HF radio in any way.  It simply rings a chime in the cockpit, which alerts the crew to call the controlling agency. Listening to poor quality SSB transmissions and static for the 3 hour flight across the ocean, can be quite annoying.

While it's fun to listen to the North Atlantic crossing traffic...I would not attempt any type of transmission.  The FAA/FCC acts quickly on illegal transmissons jeopardizing the safety of aircraft.

So if you are not an air traffic controller or a pilot in the aircraft making the crossing, then it is illegal to transmit on any aeronautical allocated frequency with the exception of Arinc Stations (Privately licensed HF stations).  Arinc station operators must be an employee of such stations to transmit.

Hope this clears any questions you have.

Tom W5RUM

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