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Author Topic: tstc in waco a good school for RF?  (Read 937 times)
NR5P
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Posts: 131




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« on: October 27, 2009, 04:53:58 PM »

I'm trying to get myself settup to go back to school.  Things in my personal life just wouldn't work out before.  I was going to tstc in waco, tx for radio electronics cert.  but I'm sure it would be better to get the whole telecommunications degree.  I would love to be an rf engineer for tv or radio.  I love doing projects...working on a class e am transmitter right now.  I think it's something that I would be good at.  Would this degree help me for getting to my goal?
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W5FYI
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« Reply #1 on: October 27, 2009, 05:15:26 PM »

My father taught electronics at TSTI (predecessor of TSTC)--for one term. He said he didn't like the "cheating" foreigners, those who talked in their native language during exams and mysteriously came up with identical answers. Dad had been an electronics student before and during WWII, which helped get him a job with the FAA as an airways electronics engineer. I think he would suggest that you contact your potential employers to see what they would recommend. I would guess Motorola's engineers might be good folks to talk to. I am sure there are others out there as well. GL
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WB2WIK
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« Reply #2 on: October 27, 2009, 08:41:15 PM »

What is an "RF engineer for TV or radio?"

There are people who design the equipment, they're EEs.  There are people who set up, maintain and service the equipment, who don't need any kind of degree, they just have to know what they're doing.  For that, a GROL probably helps.
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AC5UP
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« Reply #3 on: October 28, 2009, 01:59:49 PM »

What is an "RF engineer for TV or radio?"
_________________________

Long ago and far away commercial TV & radio stations were required to have a first 'fone on staff whenever the big signal generator was warming the ether. Logged the hourly readings for DC input and such. If anything went south their job was to grab the chicken stick and figure out why.

Today it's all automated. If something goes out of spec the controller can war dial a pager list, send e-mails, or shut down the TX as needed... In most markets there are only a small number of contract transmitter techs on-call 24/7 to multiple stations.
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WB5JEO
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« Reply #4 on: October 28, 2009, 08:14:11 PM »

How about that? My father also taught at TSTI, for many years in his case, in radio/TV repair and was close to the two-way program. At that time, one of their problems in a number of tech fields was that students were lured away to industry before they finished the program, particularly in laser, which was a new tech field then. With any field where the entry requirements aren't widely and well known, it's always best to talk to the folks who hire. TSTI can likely refer you to who hires out of that program, and you can see what graduates are doing.

Things are not always what you'd think. Back when I taught computer science, I cautioned students that many jobs that appeared to be largely programming demanded EE's. My managing engineer friend explained. He could teach an engineer to program, but he couldn't teach a programmer to be an engineer.
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W5DWH
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« Reply #5 on: November 03, 2009, 01:49:33 PM »

I taught in the community colleges in Texas for 12 years (TV repair, computer maintenance and EET). Rest assured that TSTC is a great school. They have a great reputation with industry. I would not however go into TV repair. I started out in that field in 85 and it's nearly dead. TV's and other consumer electronics are throw-away
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K5DVW
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« Reply #6 on: November 04, 2009, 05:33:09 AM »

If you want an EE, go to TAMU.
If you want an EET, TSTC is fine.
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