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Author Topic: Design a "Go Belt" instead of a "Go  (Read 3910 times)
OBSERVER11
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Posts: 657




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« Reply #30 on: January 02, 2004, 03:06:47 PM »

CHUCK! You need to define what you are going to be doing. If you are a ham, and your sole job is to COMMUNICATE, then what do you need with all the other STUFF?

(FYI - no, I was not being funny about the sidearm... I camp, I backpack, when I am in some woods - especially federal forests, I do not want to be surprised by dope growers... so my web gear has a pistol pouch and magazine pouch as well as my HF rig).

If you are trying to survive the next world war, well, you have outlined the plan. I agree that if someone showed up at my disaster, toten' all that "stuff", I would suggest that they go on down to the REACT people and see if they need any help.

You failed to mention that one of the MOST IMPORTANT THING YOU NEED TO DO TO PREPARE is to "make yourself known" to the civil disaster preparedness administration... GO VOLUNTEER TO THE COUNTY EMA OFFICE!
 
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KI4BUM
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« Reply #31 on: January 02, 2004, 10:40:36 PM »

Unless you are like me and live in a county where the EMA is run by a bunch of good ol boys who dont take volunteers. I didnt even specify what I wanted to do I just offered to volunteer wherever they needed. Got a "no thank you". Not even a "maybe later" or anything. A flat out "no".
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OBSERVER11
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Posts: 657




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« Reply #32 on: January 03, 2004, 03:19:48 AM »

yes, Northern KY is an embarassment! Heck, look at the jackass that they are using as a leader. Don't waste your time with the NKARC or any of the NKY groups, go join the Red Cross, since in a REAL emergency, it will be the Red Cross that is doing the work and the NKARC will be playing with their rubber ducks... don't believe me, look at the floods in 1997.
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KC8VWM
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Posts: 3119




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« Reply #33 on: January 04, 2004, 05:00:59 AM »


>>>>CHUCK! You need to define what you are going to be doing. If you are a ham, and your sole job is to COMMUNICATE, then what do you need with all the other STUFF? <<<<

Well quite frankly, the "other stuff" is merely for your personal safety.

Volunteering during a disaster means you are usually entering into a situation that is not generally favorable.

You usually have no heat or lighting. You will probobly need to have a food source and a method to prepare food. Your compass or GPS can be used to report your position to others, or help you if you should get lost. Safety flares can be used to mark your position or an injured individual for others to see. Your lantern can be used in the absence of electricity to provide lighting while you are "communicating."

These are only basic items that I have described.  

Hams involved with disaster communications should not only have "radio equipment" , but also have the basic essential equipment to protect & preserve their own personal safety during these situations.

Hope you had a good holiday season.

73

Charles - KC8VWM
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KC8VWM
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Posts: 3119




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« Reply #34 on: January 04, 2004, 05:08:30 AM »

 KE4SKY,

I liked some of your ideas for starting fires like using a alcohol prep pad. Novel idea!

73

Charles -KC8VWM
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KC8VWM
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« Reply #35 on: January 04, 2004, 05:10:13 AM »


>>>Let's just agree to disagree <<<

Agreed, no hard feelings.

Hope you had a good holiday season Lon.

73

Charles - KC8VWM
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WA4MJF
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Posts: 1003




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« Reply #36 on: January 04, 2004, 12:46:00 PM »

The NC SEC/State Radio Officer
only wants hams to go to
disaster areas with all necessary items
to suppport themselves.  That way we
become part of the solution and not
the problem.

It worked out very well during Isabel.

All that responded carried their own
food, water, POL, generators,
radios, etc.

Just showing up with your radio puts
you in the catagory of another mouth to
feed, shelter, etc.

Whether you use LBJ to carry it or
something else is not material.

Be like a Boy Scout, Be Prepared.

73 de Ronnie
OBS/OES District 7
NC ares/races

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OBSERVER11
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« Reply #37 on: January 04, 2004, 01:01:54 PM »

Well quite frankly, the "other stuff" is merely for your personal safety.

Volunteering during a disaster means you are usually entering into a situation that is not generally favorable.
===============================

I see your point.
But, did you know... perhaps I should not spread the word, but if you volunteer to a better agency, one that has RESOURCES, you too can have a bed to sleep in and three hot meals a day... Of all the out of area and out of the country disaster jobs I have taken part, I have never had to drag along anything but my clothes and radio... Check out joining the ARC DSHR.

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WA4MJF
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Posts: 1003




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« Reply #38 on: January 04, 2004, 01:14:39 PM »

I don't know what you mean by a better agency.
We work with the NCDEM and there is a war on
terror going on.   The MPs were cleaned outta
Eastern NC long ago, most on their 3rd tour
and the other major unit the 30th Inf Bde
was called up just before Isabel hit.

So all the tents, chow halls, generators,
water buffaloes, manpower,
and etc that the NCArNG supplied are GONE.

In better times we could go with just our
radio and clothes and be taken care of.

Now, all resources that are left are devoted
to the VICTIMS, as they should be.

Maybe you don't live in hurricane area.

73 de Ronnie

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KE4SKY
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« Reply #39 on: January 05, 2004, 10:56:58 AM »

KC8VWM,
I wasn't referring as much to alcohol prep pads as much as the gel hand sanitizers which are mostly ethyl alcohol and glycerine.  As you may know, most evacs requiring taking personnel out of combat units and back to field hospitals during Desert Storm were of the micro-evils and other vile crud caused by poor field sanitation, most often failure to wash after using the latrine and before eating.  The hardest thing to impress on ARES, RACES, Boy Scouts and grunts is the vital requirement to maintain good field hygiene in order to maintain unit effectiveness.  

Foot powder, insect repellant, travel pack baby wipes and pocket sized squeeze bottles of hand sanitizer are absolutely vital in field environments.  And if the field sanitation aid is also multi-purpose and serves as an expedient fuel to warm a hot drink or field meal, or start a warming fire to prevent onset of  hypothermia, so much the better.  Take along a bigger bottle, or stuff multiples in your BDU pockets, radio vest, survival ruck, etc.    
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N3SKO
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Posts: 69


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« Reply #40 on: January 05, 2004, 12:55:26 PM »

I'll add another point.  If you have read some of the articles in the Center for Army Lessons Learned's database, you are struck by the fact that units with poor field hygiene suffer many times the number of non-combat casualties than combat casualties.  A great example was the Russian Army in Bosnia - they got clobbered by medical problems which badly affected their readiness, largely due to their lack of a strong NCO Corps to enforce field discipline.

One thing that I have observed is the Army's use of disposables (paper plates, plastic forks and spoons) rather than the old mess kit.  Sure, disposal of the trash is a pain, but it is very difficult to adequately sanitize your mess kit in the field, especially if water is in short supply.  Likewise, the toilet paper ration in the MRE is not nearly enough (and the acronym stands for Meals Ready to Exit for some folks).  Bring disposables, toilet paper, hand sanitizer and the like and you will have lots of new friends. :-)  

The Army has a good Field Manual - FM 21-10 Field Hygiene and Sanitation which covers the basics. You can find it here: http://www.adtdl.army.mil/atdls.htm.

73,
john
N3SKO/AAT3BF/AAM3O/AAA3DE/AAA9AC
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KI4BUM
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« Reply #41 on: January 05, 2004, 04:23:10 PM »

Regarding Northern Kentucky..

actually I wasnt refering to the NKARC folks..I havnt been involved with them to have an opinion. Though I have heard some bad stories. I was talking about the Boone County emergency response folks. The group that actually gets a budget from my tax dollars and works for the county and are supposedly emergency response professionals. I see various antennas, a weather satellite receiver dish and a weather station on their building but I dont see a darn thing coming out of their office. No website, no public relations, no Amateur Radio checkins, nothing. I only ever see their little 4x4s running around town with new paint jobs sporting the "Im the emergency response guy" paint job.

And since we are on the topic of emergency response professionals...

another good story...

My wife is a registered nurse who works for a local private school (K-12grade). After 9/11 the school wanted to create an emergency response plan. As part of the plan they created an emergency response team....have any idea who wasnt on the team?  you got it. The only medically trained person on staff wasnt even consulted. The team involves the two principles, the facility manager, a teacher or two and some office staff. Im sure that response plan is going to work out reaaaaal well. Not!
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KC8VWM
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Posts: 3119




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« Reply #42 on: January 06, 2004, 02:13:00 PM »


>>>That way we become part of the solution and not
the problem. <<<

I like your way of thinking Ronnie.


>>>Of all the out of area and out of the country disaster jobs I have taken part, I have never had to drag along anything but my clothes and radio... Check out joining the ARC DSHR. <<<<

Great suggestion. It would certainly reduce one's own personal investment in the preparation for such events.


>>>>In better times we could go with just our
radio and clothes and be taken care of.

Now, all resources that are left are devoted
to the VICTIMS, as they should be.>>>>

Again Ronnie you bring up a valid and interesting point.

>>>>The hardest thing to impress on ARES, RACES, Boy Scouts and grunts is the vital requirement to maintain good field hygiene in order to maintain unit effectiveness.

Foot powder, insect repellant, travel pack baby wipes and pocket sized squeeze bottles of hand sanitizer are absolutely vital in field environments.<<<<

KE4SKY,

The importance of this cannot be stressed enough. In times of disaster, sanitation and personal hygene is usually a problem that directly relates to sickness and disease.

I feel that as Ronnie (WA4MJF)earlier suggested, "being part of the solution and not the problem" equally applies here.


73

Charles - KC8VWM
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KC8VWM
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Posts: 3119




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« Reply #43 on: January 06, 2004, 03:49:44 PM »


>>>>As part of the plan they created an emergency response team....have any idea who wasn't on the team? you got it. The only medically trained person on staff wasn't even consulted.<<<<

Interesting story. I think we need to consider our level of competence if we are intending to provide an emergency service to the general public.

What we want to avoid is our lack of skills and abilities to cope in an emergency enviroment. This will result in a very poor perception of what services we can ultimately provide and offer to local EMA's

73

Charles - KC8VWM
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KA5S
Member

Posts: 229




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« Reply #44 on: January 20, 2004, 08:20:57 PM »

I am remiss in not contributing to this thread till now but I have a "go belt."  

It's a $40 tool belt from Home Depot, with shoulder straps to take the weight of whatever is in its capacious pockets. I have used it for pedestrian-mobile HF operation with an FT-897 in the right side pocket, attached MP-1 and CH-722Sa antennas, and another rig/accessories, etc.  of my choice, plus gel-cell, in the left side pocket. Although this comes with a nylon carpenters belt with dual hooks and riveted holes, a military Web belt fits in the same loops and is easier to latch and unlatch.  Pictures can be seen in the HFPack and HFpack2 Yahoo Groups.

This does NOT stop me from having a go bag as well. An old cloth and plastic cooler with shoulder strap holds more things I need and another rig. The beauty of using the belt and pouches is, you can carry it, plus two bags and a backpack, too.

Someone help me stand up, will they?

Cortland, KA5S
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