Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: Prev 1 2 [3]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: This is silly, read  (Read 4347 times)
WANT2B_EMC
Member

Posts: 4




Ignore
« Reply #30 on: February 11, 2004, 10:26:45 AM »

>>good excuse for a drill<<

Perfect wording and description. The Duval ARES needed an excuse because there wasn't actually a need.
Logged
N4CUZ
Member

Posts: 10




Ignore
« Reply #31 on: February 11, 2004, 12:03:07 PM »

" The Duval ARES needed an excuse because there wasn't actually a need."

If you are a ham, you are invited to spend next month with us here in Jacksonville if you believe there is no need for us. The River Run is a nationally-known event, and one where we are always needed for heat stroke and many other kinds of emergencies.  We also use APRS to track where the runners are located. We have a ham in the lead vehicle, and several hams that run this long race.

This will be followed by the River Cleanup, where anything can happen, but we coordinate a very large project and give a large measure of safety to a project that would be cost-prohibitive if it was not done by volunteers.

Then, if history is any measure, we will be called upon to do the unexpected.  These kinds of activities are likely the only reason that we still have the bands that we do, and there is not one of us, who I am aware of, who has not been offered a job.  So much for the "wannabe" inference.

Bob Nelson
Duval County Emergency Coordinator

Logged
WANT2B_EMC
Member

Posts: 4




Ignore
« Reply #32 on: February 11, 2004, 02:02:41 PM »

Mr. Nelson,

Are you trying to convince me that things like a "River Run" and "River Cleanup" are considered emergency communications? Your group seems like it knows how to perform what I would call public service communications, nothing wrong with that but how can you equate or even classify a "River Cleanup" with emergency communications? I noticed also on one of your news letters at http://www.duvalares.net/news.htm that your group does a "Mall Watch" at Christmas time. All of these volunteer activities are fine and I congratulate you and your group for showing the community how valuable hams can be when events coordinators and mall security are too cheap or two lazy to get their own FRS/GMRS radios and you guys are right there on the spot. But as I said, you can't compare picking up trash and watching the mall with real life and death emergency communications. If you cannot then I can totally understand why your people were activated and dispatched unnecessarily in my opinion. Thanks for your invitation too but I know how to take care of myself, my family and my neighbors in emergencies as I've been through many in different regions and currently live in "Tornado Alley" here in the Midwest. I've had no trouble contacting other emergency workers after snow storms, tornadoes and power outages to offer my assistance without an orange vest or hat.
Logged
N4CUZ
Member

Posts: 10




Ignore
« Reply #33 on: February 11, 2004, 04:11:59 PM »

"I've had no trouble contacting other emergency workers after snow storms, tornadoes and power outages to offer my assistance without an orange vest or hat."

So have we. It sounds to me like you had a bad experience with an ARES group.  I have heard hams referred to as "old, fat, and never get out of their car types" who add very, and what they do add is ex post facto.

After all, we have police and firemen in our ARES group, and we are called in to offer our expertise on some of the new  state-wide digital systems, and we have been productive contributors without costing the tax payers a cent.  In fact, they, if anyone are the "wannabe," which is to say that they want to become more active in ARES after they retire.

One of Jacksonville's best-known and most knowledgeable power station engineers retired, and now has an office at Red Cross,  He works as a liaison between ARES and Red Cross -- at no cost.

If we sat down, we could probably count the number of lives we save each year, but I have a feeling it would be lower than the actual number.  As for saving people from the agony factor -- we were there after hurricane Andrew, and some of us were there for more than a year later. The people of South Florida know our capabilities very well.

As for the average Joe using a radio on another frequency -- do you really think that the value and implementation of net protocol would be something that they would understand or know how to follow? Can they relay around the planet?  One of my most memorable experiences as a ham was to receive a distress call while speaking to "7-land" in the US.  The operator I was speaking to heard him before me because I was using a Cushcraft ATB-34 3-band beam.  I turned the beam south and received a call from Brazil concerning getting permission for an emergency appendectomy. This town's only means of communication was ham radio.  They tape-recorded the QSO of my speaking to the girl's parents as proof to go ahead.  This is back when ham radio was the only way for a sailor to call home.  Therefore, this being a major Navy town, I had my phone-patch ready to go.

No.  I see no need to be defensive about one of the largest groups of emergency communicators in the world.
Logged
KD5UJX
Member

Posts: 73


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #34 on: February 11, 2004, 04:38:43 PM »

Bob, it's no wonder to anyone why you are in emergency managment, I don't know how you have kept your cool THIS long.

73, Bill
Logged
N4CUZ
Member

Posts: 10




Ignore
« Reply #35 on: February 11, 2004, 06:10:13 PM »

Hi there, Bill,

   It just goes with the territory. Some people have a bad experience, and it leaves them bitter.  Others think that the day of the ham radio operator has come and gone.

   If you have ever seen these satellites that we take for granted, you would be running twisted pair everywhere if you were not a ham.  That star we call our Sun is very capable of frying them all, while the ionosphere would shield us on the ground.  

   If that unlikely, but possible event ever occurred, I would be torn between becoming a traffic handler or dynamiting all of my towers. ;-)

Bob Nelson
N4CUZ
Logged
WANT2B_EMC
Member

Posts: 4




Ignore
« Reply #36 on: February 11, 2004, 07:10:27 PM »

>>>That star we call our Sun is very capable of frying them all, while the ionosphere would shield us on the ground.

If that unlikely, but possible event ever occurred, I would be torn between becoming a traffic handler or dynamiting all of my towers<<<

WOW! I'm speechless. I'll be praying for everyone in Duval county if, and God forbid, a real disaster should ever occur.
Logged
KC8VWM
Member

Posts: 3119




Ignore
« Reply #37 on: February 16, 2004, 08:10:00 PM »


>>>I have no use for the guys with the ego trips who want to be The Ham Radio Hero when the real disaster hits. <<<


Disaster preparedness is not a social occasion.

nuff said..?




Get prepared!

KC8VWM
Logged
K1CJS
Member

Posts: 6034




Ignore
« Reply #38 on: March 21, 2004, 03:21:56 PM »

Previously posted:

"Are you trying to convince me that things like a "River Run" and "River Cleanup" are considered emergency communications? Your group seems like it knows how to perform what I would call public service communications, nothing wrong with that but how can you equate or even classify a "River Cleanup" with emergency communications?"

Any sort of organized communication during an event should be considered as good training for the unexpected--after all, the same procedures are used for both, although the emergency scenario does employ a more defined and structured procedure level.

The river cleanup, for example, would use the radio to let the organizer know where the people were, if a pickup of a larger piece of debris was needed, if someone got hurt doing the cleanup, and so on.  When you come right down to it, a disaster is very similar in radio useage.

Consider also, please, what would happen if someone was needed and NOT available.  The loss of time, resources that could be put to better use elsewhere, such as the trained manpower (the first responders, not the ARES volunteers) equipment or vehicles and other things.  A police cruiser used to transport some routine material to where it may be needed may be taken from other more important duty, such as saving a life.

Public service events are valuable as training, even more so the potential emergency that doesn't materialize, but provides the opportunity just to train.  Amateur radio is a many faceted hobby.  Just because you don't enjoy or see the need for some of those varying uses doesn't mean they are not valuable to others.  Please consider that when speaking.  Thanks.
Logged
KB1KIX
Member

Posts: 16




Ignore
« Reply #39 on: April 16, 2004, 02:09:24 PM »

The only thing sillier than this thread is someone starting it with an anonymous forum ID.

At least most people are using their real call signs and not causing useless drama.

Silly initial post indeed.

Jonathan
Logged
N4CUZ
Member

Posts: 10




Ignore
« Reply #40 on: April 16, 2004, 08:15:28 PM »

Since this tread began, the Duval County ARES group has broken all-time records in attendance and hours served. Amateur Radio is a service as well as a hobby, and often the difference is not even noticed among many of us.

The non--emergency events allow people to get to know each other, practice working together, and gives operators unusual scenarios to see where intermodulation distortion may be high, such as standing atop one of our large bridges which are closed for The River Run, as well as working with our professional agencies.

We are presently preparing for an MCI involving all city and many federal agencies.  A scenario has been developed by the professional agencies, and we will have to respond to it since we are first-responder for communications during MCIs.  I am intentionally keeping what I know about the event a bit fuzzy -- including the date or dates.

Yet, we are always read for an MCI.  What we are doing, and what we consistently do, is become more ready, and train more people how to respond.  Our training never ends, and goes back to the 1960s. We do just enough to continuously improve, but we also take steps to avoid radio operator burn-out.

We train for 'when,' not 'if.'  

Bob Nelson
N4CUZ
Duval County Emergency Coordinator  
Logged
KL7IPV
Member

Posts: 984




Ignore
« Reply #41 on: July 30, 2004, 12:02:07 AM »

I had to reread this thread three times to be sure I saw it right. An article is written describing an ARES callup. It outlines the reason and how it was used. Another ham gets in and criticizes it as unnecessary and so on. After the thread goes on for 2 to 3 pages, this is written: " I am new at this and want to know as much as possable to help me get our ARES program going, " HE IS NEW AT THIS and took the time to take others to task for what he saw as unnecessary and overkill. That is just unbelieveable. If you are new at this, don't take it upon yourself to second guess others for doing a job/function that you admit you know nothing about. Come on. It is about learning. Even here, that still applies. Even for you.
73
Frank
KL7IPV
Logged
AD5TD
Member

Posts: 113




Ignore
« Reply #42 on: April 29, 2006, 09:08:36 PM »

You are right.  I am now fully trained.  With some experience under my belt.  I have a new call and feel a lot better about my ability to handle a situation if one develops.  However, I still feel it was an unnecessary call out.  As a drill, sure, not a full scale disaster.
Logged
Pages: Prev 1 2 [3]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!