Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1] 2 Next   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: If an emeregency occured. Where do we meet/listen  (Read 8575 times)
N8JGU
Member

Posts: 10




Ignore
« on: May 02, 2007, 01:25:25 PM »

So the grid fails nation wide.  Were on our own.  Where do we meet?  What mode of operation?  Where do we listen?  In the wonderful world of ham radio.  Is there a norm?  OK CB radio established CH-9.  It is assumed FRS is default CH1.  Marine is CH16.  Air is oh I can't remember.  But the point is, I am a Amatuer Operator, my radios are ready to go.  I am portable from 1mhz to 440mhz.  Im battery, solar, generator powered.  But where do we meet?  FREQUENCY, MODE, operation.  National wide is there a norm? If not, then welcome to chaos.
Logged
AA4PB
Member

Posts: 12779




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: May 02, 2007, 03:41:58 PM »

Emergency comms is primarily handled on a local county and/or state basis. Your local ARES group should have frequencies on 2M, 75M, and probably a backup for 75M on 40M.
Logged
KG4RUL
Member

Posts: 2708


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #2 on: May 02, 2007, 05:30:11 PM »

Our County ARES group has a dedicated, unlinked repeater available 147.150+ No PL.  Neighboring counties have a linked repeater system available http://home.comcast.net/~dzabawa/repeater_map.gif.  HF to the State EOC is on a standard frequency.  

All of our shelter radios are setup like Public Service radios with standardized frequencies.  http://home.comcast.net/~dzabawa/radiofreqs.htm and we encourage all members to setup their personal radios in a similar fashion.

Dennis KG4RUL
Berkeley County South Carolina ARES, Information Officer  
Logged
K9KJM
Member

Posts: 2416




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: May 02, 2007, 11:21:14 PM »

Yep, contact your county E.C. to find out what the local frequencies are.   Usually two meters for county wide nets, And HF (Usually 75 meters) for State wide nets.
(Most areas have "back up" simplex frequencies to go to if the county repeater(s) should fail. Around here we just use 146.52 simplex, As this is a mostly rural area with not that much VHF activity)
Logged
KE4SKY
Member

Posts: 1045


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #4 on: May 03, 2007, 05:19:18 AM »

The fact that you must ask this question suggests that you are not involved with EmCom in our community and that you are uninformed and unprepared. While it is true that amateur radio is a hobby, providing EmCom is a commitment. If you are not adequately trained, equipped and prepared, you cannot do your job competently or safely.

All amateurs who intend to assist with EmCom should affiliate with others in their communities.  They must become part of the organized response, and follow the established emergency communications plan developed by public safety officials and coordinating non-governmental organizations.  

There is no room in EmCom for unaffiliated, untrained, but perhaps well intentioned amateurs who would self-dispatch and freelance on their own, thinking they are going single-handedly to save the world with their radio.    

If you want to be part of the solution and not part of the problem you join a group, train to its standards and actively participate. You must learn, practice and refresh skills which may have become rusty from lack of use. Just because you may have been a ham for years doesn't mean that you are ready to provide EmCom anytime, anywhere.

There are lots of free training resources available to learn.  I would first recommend contacting the volunteer coordinator of your local office of emergency management and inquire what existing volunteer programs use amateur radio communications.  Examples would be Auxiliary Communications Service or RACES, Community Emergency Response Teams (CERT), Medical Reserve Corps, Neighborhood Watch, etc.  Then you can join a group which fits into your interests, knowledge, skills and abilities.  There is something that everyone can do.  

Logged
K2GW
Member

Posts: 535


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #5 on: May 03, 2007, 06:03:23 AM »

There is no standard nationwide frequency, because of the bedlam that would result if everyone tried to operate on one frequency.  

Local operations are on specific VHF/UHF repeaters or simplex frequencies that are coordinated to prevent interference with simultaneous operations in adjacent counties.  HF frequencies are used to tie designated rpesentatives of these local operations together for coordination.  

I would strongly suggest that you go to www.arrl.org and look up your Section Emergency Coordinator and ask him/her who your local county Emergency Coordinator is.  That person can give you the details on the plans for your area.

Also, get a copy of The ARRL Emergency Communication Handbook from www.arrl.org.  It explains how all of this works.

73

Gary, K2GW
Logged
K2GW
Member

Posts: 535


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #6 on: May 04, 2007, 06:19:05 AM »

One further thought, since we actually had a bunch of issues jumbled together.

>>CB radio established CH-9. It is assumed FRS is default CH1. Marine is CH16. Air is oh I cant remember.

Civil Air distress is actually 121.5 MHz.  But those are all distress and calling frequnecies, not emergency response frequencies.  For example, on the VHF Marine Band the subsequent response is usually on Channel 22 and resulting Air SAR operations are on 123.1 MHz

While there is no specific Amateur Radio distress and calling frequency, if you personally are in distress and can't use a cell phone or know the local EmComm repeater, 146.52 MHz, 14.300 MHz or 7.255 MHz are probably pretty good bets to use as distress calling frequencies. The latter two have longstanding amateur HF nets for providing assistance to mobile hams.

73

Gary, K2GW

Logged
KC5SAS
Member

Posts: 96




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: May 04, 2007, 06:36:03 AM »

Regarding what KE5SKY posted....
I agree completely.  

Steve, KC5SAS
ACS/RACES Officer
Iberville Parish, Louisiana
Logged
W5JUV
Member

Posts: 4




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: May 05, 2007, 07:34:36 AM »

You moron.  You would need to go to the looney tune hospital because we don't want you even trying to help out.
Logged
KG4RUL
Member

Posts: 2708


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #9 on: May 05, 2007, 10:19:18 AM »

W5JUV - Hmm, does the JUV stand for JUVenile?
Logged
N8JGU
Member

Posts: 10




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: May 07, 2007, 11:46:23 AM »

We don't need comments that are offending.  I was looking how to be involved.  You are not what I would be involved with...
Logged
N4CDB
Member

Posts: 86




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: May 07, 2007, 01:38:59 PM »

Well, I don't understand some of the responses here. I don't see that SKY pointing out "that you are uninformed and unprepared" does anything to help. Come on guys. The OP is trying to become informed and you're ripping him apart. With responses like what I've seen here I'd be inclined to share some choice words.

This sounds just like a question I got from a new ARES member. He and his wife have apparently been trying for a while to get connected but people just give useless advice like "get training". Where? What kind? Within the span of a short phone call he knew what frequencies to tune into and what he'd need for shelter work. Sure there is a lot to learn like net procedures, handling message traffic, etc. but shouldn't we be helping people in that regard instead of giving them a hard time?

As some of the more helpful posters have responded, get plugged in with your local ARES/RACES groups as well as any local radio clubs. If you've got it available, Skywarn is also a good resource. Locally we have primary and secondary repeaters as well as simplex frequencies identified.

On a more personal level, I have a network of friends around the country. We have a set of primary and secondary frequencies as well as a designated time to try and make contacts. We cover several bands to allow for band conditions. If we can't make contact within x minutes we move to the next freq. So far it's working out well. We try to get together every night since it's easier than trying to get everyone on a specific night. If you can make it fine, if not fine.

HTH and good luck getting plugged in.
Logged
KV9U
Member

Posts: 166




Ignore
« Reply #12 on: May 07, 2007, 03:33:54 PM »

I concur with the view that you would want to use the "local" and Section frequencies for your area, depending upon how you chose to participate. These are often listed in your Section Emergency Communications Plan.

I would not pay much attention to the insulting comments by some very troubled people on so many of these groups. Even if you are not trained to specific procedures, you can be a help in times of need, contrary to the absurd comments made repeatedly by some.

One of our most active storm spotters, who has been the key communicator with NWS does not even attend training and yet he is the one who shows up more often than the trained spotters.

At one time I would have recommended getting active with the NTS (ARRL National Traffic System) nets, and it can be helpful. But much of the need is for the early tactical communications done primarily by voice. Sending formal message traffic is not done that much anymore. (Although in the past year I did send a Radiogram message to AK from a WI tornado victim, so you never know).

What we need are radio amateurs who are interested in public service and who are willing to participate and learn as they advance their general expertise in communications.


73,

Rick, KV9U
Logged
KA4GFY
Member

Posts: 8




Ignore
« Reply #13 on: May 08, 2007, 05:39:59 AM »

You might also look on the ARRL's web site under nets listing.  They have local, section and regional nets listed showing days, times and frrequencies.  Look for one or two in your local area.  Its a good bet that if something happened in your area one or most of those frequencies would be active.

You can also find out who your local EC is.  He or she can help you get going.

Don't let a couple of people give you the wrong idea about amateur radio operators.  Most are willing to help if you ask.  That attitude gives all of a bad name with the public.

Rich, KA4GFY  
Logged
ROBERTKN
Member

Posts: 2




Ignore
« Reply #14 on: May 26, 2007, 05:51:13 PM »

Well, you know a thread like this illustrates 3 things:

1. There are people out there who are concerned and want to learn and become involved.

2. There are people out there who are already involved and have the proper mindset and personality to make a difference--in a positive way.

3. There are people out there who are already involved and should possibly reevaluate their motives.

KE4SKY: "The fact that you must ask this question suggests that you are not involved with EmCom in our community and that you are uninformed and unprepared."

Gee, KE4SKY, what gave you your first clue? I would question your effectiveness in the case of an event because by the time you brought your nose down from the sky the event would likely be over--unless there was a need for a high elevation to mount an antenna.

KC5SAS: "Regarding what KE5SKY posted....I agree completely."

Really, now? That's reassuring considering that there was no KE5SKY who posted in this thread. Maybe you need a little more "practice"? Should there be an incident would you be able to relay a message accurately?

W5JUV: "You moron. You would need to go to the looney tune hospital because we don't want you even trying to help out."

"We"? Be "we" I assume you are representing your ward mates in the "looney tune hospital" because I certainly do not want the likes of you involved with "helping" me or my loved ones. Oh, by the way, I think it's spelled "toon" there genius.
Logged
Pages: [1] 2 Next   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!