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Author Topic: Should I be in ECom?  (Read 21122 times)
W0IPL
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« on: September 18, 2007, 05:52:52 AM »

At the risk of letting the trolls out from under the bridge again;

I have been thinking about what to tell new people that are interested in Emergency Communication. How do you tell them the amount of time required, the training they will need and, most importantly, the "why should I" (or shouldn't I - as the case may be). I am looking for input on what I have missed, what I have gotten wrong and what can be improved. The first pass is at:  http://www.w0ipl.net/ShouldI.htm

I am looking for comments rather than just rants - please.

Thanks
 Pat

--
Snoopy best summarized the time for training when he said:
"Five minutes before the party is not the time to learn how to dance."
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AC2Q
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« Reply #1 on: September 18, 2007, 08:55:49 AM »

All in All your first pass looks quite concise to me.

Although you left out having to posess a high tolerance for Beurocracy =0)
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W0IPL
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« Reply #2 on: September 18, 2007, 12:15:28 PM »

"high tolerance for bureaucracy"  - BINGO!

I'll have to find some way to add that. :-)
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KB3LSR
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« Reply #3 on: September 18, 2007, 01:54:00 PM »

Kind of a moot point, but maybe give a little detail about the FEMA classes, rather than just list them as "IS-100" and so on?  Good work with the page!

73 de KB3LSR
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KC8VWM
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« Reply #4 on: September 18, 2007, 08:47:32 PM »

I would consider removing or revising the following statement:

"The negative side is someone in ECom, just to "be where the action is". These people tend to be wanna-be types. That is to say they wanna-be a policeman, or wanna-be a fireman but do not have what it takes to do either of those jobs. People in that group can do the largest favor to Amateur Radio by not participating in ECom."


Not a rant. Just a few objective observations.

Reason?

The first pint is that we are not trying to discourage real policeman, fire "personnel" (politically correct here) and EMS from participating in emcom activities are we?

The second point is that I know many public service types that also happen to be hams including myself for that matter. I do know what you are trying to convey in that thought and I don't necessarily disagree with the principles behind that statement  however it's not really necessary to articulate that point in such a point blank way.

Perhaps the statement could be revised to indicate  that individuals who demonstrate themselves unprofessionally  when representing themselves in an emcom capacity instead.

In other words, if individuals are interested in becoming an emcom professional, it's not necessary to conduct themselves as a public safety professional - if that makes any sense.

It should be obvious that emcom has it's own specified and defined role. If that role isn't clarified and clearly understood among the volunteering participants, then someone isn't doing something right.

73 de Charles - KC8VWM
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W0IPL
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« Reply #5 on: September 18, 2007, 09:47:58 PM »

VWM - I think I'm missing your point.

When it says (about newbies) "but do not have what it takes to do either of those jobs" - referring to police or fire positions, I would think that any of the public service (PS) professionals would not think ill of the example. If they already are professionals they obviously - do - have what it takes to do their jobs. Therefore to tell potential ECom newbies that if their (the newbie's) motivation is just to get closer to the incident, it is not a good fit, would actually help the PS professional understand where we are coming from.

As I said, I think I'm not understanding your point.
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W0IPL
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« Reply #6 on: September 19, 2007, 06:31:22 AM »

LSR - Good point - done.
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KC0SHZ
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« Reply #7 on: September 19, 2007, 06:33:14 AM »

I agree with the earlier comment about fleshing out a description of the ISO classes.

I also can see where VVM is coming from.  The paragraph needs work as it could be off-puting or even seen as derogative.  Lord knows, we have enough people who get into EMCOMM and then pull the ladder up behind them.  We don't need to be putting people off without intent.

Overall, a nice and quick read.  I might add some links to other more detailed sources of EMCOMM info.  I would also consider adding comments about the long times between need, the short notice of need, the financial risks that you face (Skywarn won't fix your car's hail or lightning damage.)
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W5HTW
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« Reply #8 on: September 19, 2007, 02:26:12 PM »

VWM, is that an oxymoron?  "Emcom professional?"   We are NOT professionals based upon our amateur license.  We MAY be professionals if we are also, coincidentally, police offiers, fire personnel, medical personnel, etc., but an AMATEUR license does not make one a "professional" anything.  That takes a "professional" license.  Once we declare an amateur license is a professional license, we no longer have amateur radio.  

We are amateur volunteers.  If we become something else, amateur radio become extinct.  Once an amateur license is a qualification for a job, any job, it is no longer an amateur license but a professional one, like a welding certification.  Or a CDL.  

I believe this is a serious problem in amateur radio today.  Someone gets an amateur radio license and instantly thinks "Now I am a professional."  It isn't true!!  And the REAL public safety folks do not want self-declared "professinals" wandering around the scene.  Any scene, except perhaps a company picnic.  

We are misleading a lot of people into believing that a ham license is a short cut to police or medical certification, and to being a member of a "government agency."   Not true in the slightest.  But in delivering that impression, we are destroying amateur radio.

ed
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W0IPL
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« Reply #9 on: September 19, 2007, 05:19:46 PM »

SHZ - "We don't need to be putting people off without intent."

I do appreciate your input.

Having done most of this type of work from rank beginner (1978), to AEC to EC and then to State training manager, I tend to take a harder stand on some things. I am of the opinion that losing a few people that are easily offended or that have not given adequate thought to their own true motivation, is a small price compared to bringing in someone that has an attitude that will offend our served agencies.

If you have some specific thoughts that would accomplish what you are thinking of and yet help weed out those that need to be weeded out, please send them to me at mycall at arrl dot net. I would be happy to discuss your ideas in more detail.
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KC8VWM
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« Reply #10 on: September 19, 2007, 07:37:26 PM »

"Emcom professional?" We are NOT professionals based upon our amateur license.

----


Correct and I agree.

However the context I am using the term "professional is to imply that we conduct ourselves "professionally" as opposed to conducting ourselves as bumbling "Barney Fife's"

Holding an amateur radio license has nothing to do with it really.

73 de Charles - KC8VWM
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KE4SKY
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« Reply #11 on: September 20, 2007, 05:13:50 AM »

I would simply add the link to the NIMS Course Descriptions, it is:

http://training.fema.gov/IS/NIMS.asp

The thumbnails are:

ICS 100, Introduction to the Incident Command System, introduces the Incident Command System (ICS) and provides the foundation for higher level ICS training. This course describes the history, features and principles, and organizational structure of the Incident Command System. It also explains the relationship between ICS and the National Incident Management System (NIMS).

ICS 200 is designed to enable personnel to operate efficiently during an incident or event within the Incident Command System (ICS). ICS-200 provides training on and resources for personnel who are likely to assume a supervisory position within the ICS. Primary Audience is persons involved with emergency planning, response or recovery efforts.
Prerequisites: IS-100.

ICS-700 introduces NIMS and takes approximately three hours to complete. It explains the purpose, principles, key components and benefits of NIMS. The course also contains "Planning Activity" screens giving you an opportunity to complete some planning tasks during this course. The planning activity screens are printable so that you can use them after you complete the course.

ICS-800 describes how the Federal Government will work in concert with State, local, and tribal governments and the private sector to respond to disasters. This course introduces the NRP.  It is intended for DHS and other Federal staff responsible for implementing the NRP, and Tribal, State, local and private sector emergency management professionals.


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WA4MJF
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« Reply #12 on: September 24, 2007, 12:38:16 PM »

Yes, professional usually means doing a
good job.  You want that type of person
in any volunteer endeavor, be it EMCOMM,
VFD, VRS, Auxillary Police, etc.

I have a real problem with the "I'm just
a volunteer, so don't bug me about how
I perform" mentality.  You should in
any endeavor, strive to be as professional
as the paid folks.

I say this being a retired paid LEO, a VFD
officer, a volunteer EMT on a VRS and
an auxillary police officer at various
times in my life.

73 de Ronnie
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W4MKH
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« Reply #13 on: October 01, 2007, 01:31:10 PM »

Can I have permission to link to that from our ARES site?

I'm the membership AEC for St. Johns county Florida. I've just assumed this position and I'm looking for ideas.

Marshall
W4MKH
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K1CJS
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Posts: 5998




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« Reply #14 on: October 14, 2007, 08:00:48 AM »

"......."Emcom professional?" We are NOT professionals based upon our amateur license. We MAY be professionals if we are also, coincidentally, police offiers, fire personnel, medical personnel, etc., but an AMATEUR license does not make one a "professional" anything. That takes a "professional" license. Once we declare an amateur license is a professional license, we no longer have amateur radio."

Compared to some people who are using radios, we are professional 'communicators'.  You're right -- on the other hand.  Unless we actually are a member of the police or fire departments or in the medical profession we do not belong anywhere near anything to do with those duties.

I suppose it would surprise you to know that in times of emergency, in some communities trained amateur radio operators/ARES members do man the dispatch desks of fire and police departments, freeing the officers who usually do those jobs for outside duty.

The majority of us also know how to connect and set up equipment.  Most of the officers, firemen and medical personnel don't know a radio RF connector from a vehicle power socket.  

Its not reasoned out when some people say we're not professional 'anything'--in an emergency, some of us are the closest thing to an all-around radio professional there is.
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