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Author Topic: Should I be in ECom?  (Read 21039 times)
KF7CG
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Posts: 827




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« Reply #60 on: June 06, 2011, 10:35:50 AM »

All Amateurs should be willing, able, and trained to communicate in a emergency.

This does not mean that they should be part of the organized emcom group. Just trained enough to deliver emergency messages when required. Some have the talent and personality to be a regular communications auxilliary officer. They are needed some of the time also.

When you are the first on the scene of a problem and the cellphones (or your cellphone) is down, the is the time for Amateur Emergency Communications. It can happen on a back road in the country on a beautiful day, Be Prepared. Report the problem, you have just done emergency communications.

Too many here are letting, words, vocations, and avocations get in the way of the basic premise, which is to be prepared to provide communications when the need is present. I would and and the wisdom to know when it is needed but wisdom is something I will not claim.

KF7CG
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K1CJS
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Posts: 5981




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« Reply #61 on: July 28, 2011, 05:25:44 AM »

....Also, you need to clarify that although volunteers can "act in a professional manner", they can *NEVER* be a "professional emergency communicator" because the word "professional" means that they ARE PAID for what they are doing....

That is only one definition of the word professional.  There are others, such as this:

1.  Following a line of conduct as though it were a profession. <a professional patriot>

The reasoning that professionals are PAID is usually correct, but there are those who are NOT.
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AE6ZW
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« Reply #62 on: September 11, 2011, 04:45:39 AM »

I afraid, in event of emergency, I myself is in need of help, I am not sure, if I can able to offer help to others while I my self need help.   if telephone does not work, I am not sure if 911 operating desk will be listening in HAM frequency , and which channel they are listening.   we ham probably something similar to CH 9 of CB band.
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LA9XSA
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Posts: 376




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« Reply #63 on: September 11, 2011, 06:00:21 AM »

I afraid, in event of emergency, I myself is in need of help, I am not sure, if I can able to offer help to others while I my self need help.   if telephone does not work, I am not sure if 911 operating desk will be listening in HAM frequency , and which channel they are listening.
You can find out ahead of time if there are ARES or RACES groups, and what nets would be activated in your area. Even if there are none, you could just get in touch with a radio operator outside the affected area who can relay your message via the phone or services like the Red Cross missing and welfare system.

In case of disasters where many of the local hams would be affected themselves, it's good to have established assistance between neighboring counties, so they can travel into the affected area and relieve the local operators in case of a long term outage.
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KC0SHZ
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Posts: 373




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« Reply #64 on: September 14, 2011, 11:44:31 AM »

Just being able to get out onto the SATERN/SAROF net on 14.265 every morning at 10am CST, would be helpful in helping your friends and neighbors.

Having some ability to run on batteries means you learn about batteries beyond the one in your car and the ones in your flashlight.  This knowledge can be helpful in an emergency.  We have solar yard lights.  I think I will charge those boys up and bring them into my neighbor's houses at night so they can have a little light.  It will make things nicer in the event of another big power failure.

Got a generator?  Figure out how to use it to keep your family secured and still help a neighbor with a new baby keep their formula safe.

You make a mistake trying to be hardcore.  What will be needed is people who are willing to help people on a local level and have the skills to do so. 

A ham license is a federal license to screw around in your garage.  That time spent building an antenna, or figuring out how to run a solar panel to charge your deep cycle batteries is like going to emergency school.  Just keep going to "school" and when an emergency hits, you will be able to help just fine.


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K1CJS
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Posts: 5981




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« Reply #65 on: September 17, 2011, 12:13:21 PM »

You can find out ahead of time if there are ARES or RACES groups, and what nets would be activated in your area. Even if there are none, you could just get in touch with a radio operator outside the affected area who can relay your message via the phone or services like the Red Cross missing and welfare system....

Although it is a good idea to do that, usually the busiest, most accessible repeater (the one that is an area wide repeater versus the one that is local only) will usually host the area net. 

On the other hand, using the internet to find out when area ham clubs hold nets can help too--and most of the time that can be done at the outset of any sort of emergency.
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K1CJS
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« Reply #66 on: September 17, 2011, 12:15:23 PM »

At least KI4SDY stopped talking to himself.
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LA9XSA
Member

Posts: 376




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« Reply #67 on: September 19, 2011, 01:01:40 PM »

A ham license is a federal license to screw around in your garage.  That time spent building an antenna, or figuring out how to run a solar panel to charge your deep cycle batteries is like going to emergency school.  Just keep going to "school" and when an emergency hits, you will be able to help just fine.
Experience, know-how and improvisation is definitely what makes amateurs an asset in an emergency, but some formal training and a pre-established relationship to emergency agencies or NGOs are also recommended to make use of that effectively and efficiently in an emergency. You need to know how you fit into the organized chaos.
Although it is a good idea to do that, usually the busiest, most accessible repeater (the one that is an area wide repeater versus the one that is local only) will usually host the area net. 
Thank you for pointing that out. Some repeaters have emergency power, and even those that don't have that might be useful if the type of emergency is a technical one which takes out the phone and internet communications while not affecting power.
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W2KYM
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Posts: 19




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« Reply #68 on: September 20, 2011, 08:44:48 AM »

Do not depend on repeaters!!!
They can be easily taken out of service and/or can fail!!
D-STAR is nice as is ECHOLINK, but they also can be taken down and/or fail and not everyone has D-STAR.
A simple analog SIMPLEX network is the way to do it. Sorry gang, hand helds just don't cut it (unless you have a crossband plan).
Make yourself that 50W go-kit with about 30' of poles and a good J-Pole antenna fed with minimum RG-8 (LMR400 being optimal).

 Smiley
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