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Author Topic: Tixie  (Read 4345 times)
KG4FLJ
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Posts: 5




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« on: June 05, 2006, 05:43:38 PM »

While in Dayton this year, I discovered FAR Circuits and bought a Tixie board.  For those of you unfamiliar with the Tixie, it is basically a Pixie 2 with a Tick keyer from Embedded Research.  Well, it almost sounds like I have a clue but don't let that fool you because I don't.  Wink  Anyone have an assembly guide or parts guide for this  little guy?  It's a simple radio but I'm over my head sadly.  Anyone built this little guy?  I really want to get into homebrewing QRP so I really want to make this work.
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WB6BYU
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Posts: 13487




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« Reply #1 on: June 06, 2006, 12:55:35 PM »

A friend of mine has one, and has spent a lot of time
trying to reduce the keyclicks in the sidetone down to where
they don't blow his ears off.

What sort of help/advice do you need?  The basic Pixie
circuit is available a number of places on the web, but
if you need more than that I'll see if he has the info.
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KG4FLJ
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« Reply #2 on: June 06, 2006, 06:11:27 PM »

So, I can just use the basic info for the Pixie?  If that's the case, that should get me going.  Thanks for replying.
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WB6BYU
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« Reply #3 on: June 07, 2006, 12:44:53 PM »

I'm pretty sure it is a common Pixie circuit using an LM386
chip for the audio and a pair of transistors for oscillator
and amp/mixer.  The circuit is pretty simple, so it shouldn't
be difficult to trace out the board and see if it fits.

I think the sidetone problem my friend had was that the
normal Pixie shuts down the audio amp during transmit, and
this version was trying to leave it on for the sidetone
from the keyer.
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KG4FLJ
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« Reply #4 on: June 07, 2006, 08:04:26 PM »

It looks pretty darn close.  I think you're dead on.  Any idea what the var cap is for?  I couldn't find it in the Pixie schematic.  I admit also, I'm a newbie at this homebrewing but I like it.  If I can get enough of it behind me, I want to do a complete homebrew shack.  I am currently working on sticking together a Softrock v7.0 SDR.  Should have it done by the weekend so that I can get back on the Tixie.
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WB6BYU
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« Reply #5 on: June 08, 2006, 10:55:16 AM »

Don't know which schematic you are looking at, but there
may be a variable cap to tune the output, or one on the
crystal to pull it a bit on either transmit or receive.
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K8AG
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Posts: 352




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« Reply #6 on: June 14, 2006, 09:25:27 AM »

The variable cap is to go in series with the crystal to pull the frequency so you can move around a bit in the band.  I say a bit because it only lets you move a few khz at most.

Remember that the pixie II is a minimal parts radio and will not give you decent service.  Heck if it works at all its amazing.  And that is why it is a really great project.  It works and is very simple and very fundamental.

Receives both sides of a signal so you will want to move your frequency if an op doesn't come back to you when they are loud.  You just may be on their wrong side.

Also note, if the 9 volt battery gets low it will receive very badly and it does pick up AM radio stations very nicely. Sad  Its wide (essentially the only filter is between your ears).  But it works.

Maybe some day we'll hook up pixie to pixie.

72, JP, K8AG
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KB1PDK
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Posts: 32




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« Reply #7 on: November 26, 2011, 12:04:02 AM »

What circuitry do you have to add to the Pixie to encorporate the keyer in order to modify it to be a Tixie.  I thought I would program a microcontroller board to control it, but I'm not sure if that's what it's to be used for.

George
KB1PDK
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K8AXW
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Posts: 3965




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« Reply #8 on: November 26, 2011, 08:05:36 AM »

Contact FAR Circuits and ask what article the circuit board was made from.  Plan B would be to go to the FAR website and look through his list of available boards, probably listed under "transceivers" from your description.  He has his board categorized according to function, circuit article name, date and source listed.
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K8AXW
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« Reply #9 on: November 26, 2011, 08:35:34 AM »

Is this what you're looking for?

QRPp Winter97   TIXIE 2 WITH TIC KEYER   $6.00


More:

Tixie Transceiver

The next extension of the Pixie is called the Tixie. This is a newly designed board that incorporates a "TICK" keyer chip (microprocessor controlled keyer in an 8 pin package) onto the board itself. A TICK keyer plus a Pixie transceiver equals a "Tixie" transceiver. Now you have a QRP transceiver with built in keyer for under $20. This is a bit large (3 inches square) for an Altoids box but is purposely spread out on the PC board to encourage experimentation. The board is available from FAR Circuits, the Pixie parts are again available from HSC, the standard QRP frequency crystals can be bought from NorCal, and the TICK keyer chip can be purchased from Embedded Research. Your miscellaneous parts can be bought at Radio Shack (Frigid North) or pulled from other sources.


There is a lot more information available for the Pixie than the Tixie. 

Contact this guy.  Perhaps he can help you.  http://www.al7fs.us/AL7FS2.html

This info should give you something to do for a bit!  :-)

Good luck.

Al
« Last Edit: November 26, 2011, 08:50:27 AM by K8AXW » Logged
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