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Author Topic: Why a licence???  (Read 3914 times)
N8UZE
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« Reply #15 on: February 12, 2002, 02:17:08 PM »

Requiring a license does not violate your freedom of speech.  It simply requires that you demonstrate the appropriate technical knowledge and safety precautions to operate the particular equipment used in this area of communication.  If we were to drop licensing, it would be necessary to limit operators to extremely low power equipment with limited capabilities (such as the conditions CB operators are supposed to adhere to but often don't).

It can be compared to the ability to move around.  Anyone can walk, buy a bus or plane or train ticket.  But you must have a license to drive.  You need an additional endorsement for motorcycles and commercial drivers need additional endorsements.  Each of these requires passing a test to demonstrate the knowledge necessary to function successfully and safely.
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AB8LQ
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« Reply #16 on: February 12, 2002, 03:47:50 PM »

I don't understand why you believe that 'free speech' applies to radio transmissions.  Public resources, whatever they may be, are doled out in various ways and for various reasons.  In this case, you need to take a fairly simple test (or tests) before being allowed to use the resource.

You been given at least two good reasons why hams are licensed: knowledge and safety.  Believe it or not, both are really fairly important within the ham bands.  At high power, you can do serious damage to yourself or others with RF.  As for knowledge, well, if you don't think it's necessary, you should read a bit about how the hams augmented and supplied communications in Manhatten on 9/11 and the days following.

I'm probably sounding more harsh than I should, but I find it difficult to understand how anyone could think the free speech argument applies to radio, further it annoys me when people want something for nothing.  TANSTAAFL.

If you aren't willing to spend a few hours studying for a simple test -- much simpler than getting a driver's license -- then I don't feel you have any right to be transmitting.

Sean.
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KD5OWO
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Posts: 440


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« Reply #17 on: February 12, 2002, 05:18:29 PM »

Jed,
    Did you listen to one thing anyone said.  Good points there WF0N and AB8LQ about the Practice of Good Safty. You see JED I was wrong the license is not just about keeping people from Using Profanity and Limiting Traffic down to trained 'Citizens';but that is part of it.   N8UZE makes a wonderful point when he states that 'Free Speech' Does not apply to radio Transmissions on Amateur Bands.  NCUNIT33 Makes good points except saying that CB should have a License to Operate also well I have not really thought about that;but what little I did think about I don't think they should have to take a test but I do think that they need to have some 'On Air' Rules.

73
Steve Anness,KD5OWO
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AB8LQ
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Posts: 15




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« Reply #18 on: February 13, 2002, 10:23:25 AM »

To respond to KD5OWO, CB *does* have rules and regulations.  They just aren't followed very well in most cases anymore.

Until sometime in the mid 70's, I believe,  when the CD radion craze hit, you needed a license.  It was a bit like GMRS is today, if I recall correctly.  You filled out a form, sent in some money, agreed to some rules, and you were licensed.

Even using FRS, there are rules you are required to follow.

Sean.
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KD5OWO
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« Reply #19 on: February 13, 2002, 05:53:22 PM »

OK!  Well nice to know that there are rules on CB!  The thing here is they are getting away with using profanity!  The FCC needs to get involved..  For anybody out there who thinks that ham radio is the Cleanest talk very rare I do hear some slip in a Word or two now never the F word but down on New Orleans I was listening to two meters we heard SOB on time and the D word!
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JED
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« Reply #20 on: February 24, 2002, 04:21:12 AM »

OMG!!! LOL!!!  

"HE said a bad word Im gonna tell!!"
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KD5OWO
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« Reply #21 on: February 24, 2002, 11:02:40 AM »

I found it just shocking that on 2m they said such words.  That was clearly against the law. They could spend up to 10yrs in prison and/or be fined up tp 10,000! They could have also there license.  

Jed,
  You may not find anything wrong with it but for them to say those words on the air was WRONG.  If you think it is ok then you need to get off this fourm.  I don't think there are many hams that find it right to call somone a SOB on there air.  

Steve,KD5OWO
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JED
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Posts: 1




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« Reply #22 on: February 25, 2002, 10:59:46 PM »

If words hurt you your already screwed. Its not right for someone to call you a SOB period. But is they're laws against it? No (except in some hitlerian jurisdictions and on radio).Should there be laws against it? I dont think so. People can be rude get over it.
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KD5OWO
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« Reply #23 on: February 25, 2002, 11:19:17 PM »

I am 13 and I hear those words all the time I can face it yes.  What you don't see is there are hams out there has young has 9 years old now hey think what you want;but a 9 year old should not have to listen to that.  I really to wish there is another ham out there to back me up.  On the Ham radio there is a law against it there will always be a law face it sorry JED. I have one thing to tell you "Go Talk on CB"

Steve,KD5OWO
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WA4DOU
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Posts: 436




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« Reply #24 on: February 27, 2002, 03:51:32 PM »

I wouldn't be surprised if this is the next step after those who complain bitterly about having to learn morse code. We're all living in an open air insane assylum anymore!
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KD5OWO
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« Reply #25 on: February 27, 2002, 05:04:26 PM »

Amateur Radio is turning sour.  People griping about code people useing profanity.  Where did the band policee go?  

73
Steve,KD5OWO
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KG4RYT
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« Reply #26 on: March 13, 2002, 10:28:05 AM »

JED, JUST STUDY AND GET YOUR TECH AND YOU WILL BE GLAD YOU DID. I DON'T WANT TO KNOCK CB RADIO BUT AS A WHOLE YOU FIND A BETTER BUNCH ON HAM BANDS SIMPLE BECAUSE THEY HAVE SOMETHING TO LOSE IF THEY DON'T FOLLOW THE RULES WITH CB THERE IS NO LONGER ANY CONTROLS.
73'S JIM KG4RYT (THE RABBIT ON CB)
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KD5OWO
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« Reply #27 on: March 13, 2002, 05:00:04 PM »

Jim,
   I would just hope if JED gets his license he does not told on the radio like they do on CB.  Now I don't mean to sound rude I would welcome in on the radio anytime as long as he follows amateur rules.  

73
Steve Xavier Anness,KD5OWO
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BRS183557
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« Reply #28 on: March 25, 2002, 09:00:15 AM »

Jed,
    The following is a section from a british amateur radio govermental departmants many papers. It should exsplain a few things.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Why must I take a radio and electrical theory examination before I can become a radio amateur?


Under the International Radio Regulations, which govern the use of radio throughout the world, a licence to transmit cannot be granted which could lead to interference to other radio stations operating in accordance with the Regulations. The Radio Amateurs' Examination (RAE) and the Novice Radio Amateurs' Examination (NRAE) are therefore necessary to ensure that a prospective amateur has a good knowledge of radio and electrical theory, and is able to operate in a responsible way. The Novice Licence Training Course which must be successfully completed before taking the NRAE, also provides a good grounding in radio and electrical theory and practice. The amateur may typically work in a domestic environment and may be using high radio powers. There is a licence obligation on a radio amateur to avoid causing interference to other wireless telegraphy services (this phrase includes television) so a major reason for an examination is to ensure that a potential licensee is fully aware of the interference potential of radio equipment and knows how to remedy any problems that arise, for example, in some circumstances the amateur may need to modify his transmission practice to minimise a problem to neighbours.

The amateur service is unique in the field of radio in encouraging users to experiment with home made equipment and in giving such freedom to change and develop equipment without any prior approval of the Radiocommunications Agency (RA), the UK government agency which is responsible for all non- broadcast uses of radio.

Therefore, because of the need for a minimum uniform standard of knowledge in all relevant areas of radio, the RA will issue a licence only to those who have passed the RAE or the NRAE.

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KD5OWO
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« Reply #29 on: March 27, 2002, 05:29:14 PM »

You have answered his question quite well.  Thats what he wanted to know "Why a License"

73
Steve,KD5OWO
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