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Author Topic: Certificate of completion needed?  (Read 758 times)
KENNETH
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Posts: 27




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« on: August 03, 2003, 09:54:05 PM »

When a person upgrades their ham class do you have to provide the exam coordinator with a copy of your previous element certificate of completion? I have read that these certificates expire in one year and was wondering how ham's go about upgrading years later without re-taking previous elements? Thanks in advance for your help.
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KC2FDQ
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Posts: 23




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« Reply #1 on: August 04, 2003, 10:08:32 AM »

It depends....what license class do you have now?  What date does the CSCE have on it?  

Matthew
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KENNETH
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Posts: 27




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« Reply #2 on: August 04, 2003, 10:48:55 AM »

I don't have a license yet.  Some folks say you need to show your certificate of element completion to upgrade. Others say you just need a copy of your Ham license. IF a person needs to show their Cert. of completion for an upgrade then that says to me, folks can only upgrade within on year without re-taking previous elements. But I have heard of folks upgrading many years later with out re-taking the previous elements? After one year, how do folks go about proving they passed the previous elements without a Cert. of completion? Thanks for your help.
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K1ZC
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Posts: 113




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« Reply #3 on: August 04, 2003, 01:23:17 PM »

This question comes up mainly with respect to Element 1 (Morse code).  The CSCE give you element credit toward licensing for one year, while the various FCC issued licenses provides element credit for the term of the license plus the two year grace period.

If a Tech has a CSCE for Morse Code, they must upgrade to General within one year or be prepared to retest on code.  This quirk comes about because the FCC stopped issuing "Tech Plus" licenses a few years back, so the CSCE is the only proof you have of passing Element 1 and the CSCE credit expires after a year.

This may not make much sense, but that is the way the regulations read.  If you are interested in the details, look at 97.505 for the specific rules.
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KENNETH
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« Reply #4 on: August 04, 2003, 01:39:14 PM »

Thanks for your help. So the code element expires within on year when it comes to upgrades but do the written elements 2,3 and 4 expire also?
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N8UZE
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Posts: 1524




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« Reply #5 on: August 04, 2003, 07:53:16 PM »

Your license is good for credit for the term of the license plus (in most cases) the grace period for renewal.  So if your license is current, you take a copy of it and the original to the test session.  You do not take the old CSCE.

However, if you do not pass all the elements for a license, then they will issue a CSCE for those you passed and you must complete the remainder of the requirements within a year from when the CSCE is issued.

So let's say you earn a Tech license.  That Tech license is good for credit for that test element as long as it is in good standing.   So if you decide to try to upgrade to General after being a Tech for several years, you do NOT have to retake the Tech written.  You only take the General written and the code.  Let's say you only pass one of those (or only try one of those) at the session.  You will be issued a CSCE for that element.  To get the General, you will have to pass the other element within a year of the date of issue of the CSCE.  If you don't, you will have to retake that element too.


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K1ZC
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« Reply #6 on: August 05, 2003, 12:49:57 PM »

Kenneth,

A CSCE, for any element, is only good for one year unless a license issues.  If a license issues, you have credit for any elements required for that license for as long as the license remains active (including the two-year grace period).  

Strictly speaking you do not have a year; the regulation reads 365 days.  Normally that doesn't matter, but 2004 is a leap year and you just know that somebody is going to wait until the last minute and lose their credits.
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