Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Contacted a KL Station, that wasnt in Alaska...  (Read 1663 times)
CU2AAV
Member

Posts: 6




Ignore
« on: August 28, 2003, 09:39:44 AM »

Hi ALL!

I Contacted a Station in US that had a KL calsign and after trying to get his QSL info, I found out he was not in Alaska?!?

How this can be? Now If I receive his QSL Card, Will I have a KL confirmed? I dont fill confortable with this, I rather have one "realy" from there, hi hi!

Anyone here knows why this happens?
73 de Ricardo
CU2AAV
Logged
K1ZC
Member

Posts: 113




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: August 28, 2003, 09:58:26 AM »

Ricardo,

KL calls are issued to hams living in Alaska or to military personnel stationed in Korea (the KL9KAA-KL9KHZ range).  However, if a ham relocates to another part of the United States they are allowed to keep their call sign.  It is no longer possible to tell which part of the United States a ham is from just from his call sign.

If you need a "real" contact, swing that beam and keep on calling CQ.

Logged
CU2AAV
Member

Posts: 6




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: August 28, 2003, 10:12:16 AM »

Hi James, well thank you for information, looks confuse that way, I guess I have to ask them where they are next time!

Ok, I will continue to beam towards Alaska, :-)
73 James!
Logged
OBSERVER9
Member

Posts: 1




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: August 29, 2003, 02:19:40 AM »

Richardo,
Welcome to the US Vanity Callsign Program! The FCC screwed up when they started to allow prefixes and radio districts to be be issued outside that district!

I too need KL7 and I am getting tired of working KL7's in Arizona, Florida, New Mexico and California.

Logged
CU2AAV
Member

Posts: 6




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: August 29, 2003, 07:10:36 AM »

Hi "Observer9?" (No name?)
Well, it sure looks wird system, I wonder how or if, the KL7's them selfs feel satisfyed with this "System" ?

I personnaly beleive this goes against all I have study!
By, IARU a Prefix IS a Prefix, and they exist so we can have a clear way to identify where are we DXing into!!!

I thougth a Vanity Callsign had to do with the SUFIX, not with the PREFIX ?!?!

Well, nobody is Perfect, lets hope, who made this mistake figures out, its so perfect after all and change it, it there any more Prefix that are messd up like this? I should know about?
Logged
N8UZE
Member

Posts: 1524




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: August 29, 2003, 08:06:08 AM »

To get a KL, vanity or not, you have to be in Alaska at the time.  However once you move, you don't have to change it.  If the person were to change call signs after they move (either vanity or sequential issue), they could not get another KL or any prefix that designates locations outside the contiguous 48 states unless they are living in that special location.  The vanity system does permit a person to get any call sign that is available from the block for the contiguous states.

Since the majority of regions contain more than one state, the numerical designator isn't as helpful as some try to claim.  Take the "0" region for example. Is the station in N. Dakota, S. Dakota, Kansas, Nebraska, Colorado, Missouri, Iowa, or Minnesota?  There's no way to tell unless you ask or look up the call sign (assuming that the data base is correct and up to date).
Logged
W3HF
Member

Posts: 694


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #6 on: August 29, 2003, 08:07:08 AM »

To Observer9:

This is NOT an artifact of the vanity system. Although a vanity call does not have to be from the same district (1 through 10) of the applicant, it CAN'T be from the outlying areas (Alaska, Pacific Insular, Caribbean Insular). ALL initial applications for calls with L, H, or P as the second letter MUST have an address that matches appropriately.

What's going on here is that there is no requirement that a licensed ham GIVE UP that call when s/he moves out of that region. So a former Alaskan resident can keep his KL7 call wherever he moves. This rule has been in place since the late 70s, and is the same rule that lets you keep your own call when you move out of district.

One side note: it IS true that some folks have abused the callsign process by using "artificial" addresses to maintain a mailing address in a remote area. For example, if I had an aunt who lived in Honolulu, I could ask her to accept mail for me. I could then use that as my mailing address for FCC purposes, and request a KH6 callsign. But that, too, is not a vanity artifact. That's caused by the FCC's use of a mailing address for license purposes, and could be used just as well for sequential callsign purposes.

Steve
W3HF
Logged
W3HF
Member

Posts: 694


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #7 on: August 29, 2003, 08:25:05 AM »

To Ricardo (CU2AAV0:

The US FCC rules do not violate international rules. The prefixes that are assigned to the United States are K, N, W, and AA-AL. The international agreements do NOT specify how these prefixes are sub-allocated to regions within the United States, any more than they specify how the block assigned to Portugal (CQ-CU) is suballocated. Portugal could very easily change its rules tomorrow, and allow you to keep your CU prefix if you move to Madeira, and this would not violate the international rules.

As for the US vanity program, applicants can choose both the prefix AND the suffix, although there are limits on what prefix is allows. As I said in my earlier message (and as N8UZE said), it only depends on the address at time of application, and the callsign will follow the holder as s/he moves within the country.

But I agree, it IS confusing. As for whether the KLs who have moved like it, I think it is a personal decision. As you have found, there are some who DO keep their callsigns, so they must like it. But others have requested "mainland" calls when they move back. So it seems the reviews are mixed.

You asked for whether there are any other prefixes that are "messed up" like this. Well, all US callsigns are subject to these rules, so this would apply to any call issued by the US FCC. This includes all AL/KL/NL/WL calls, AH/KH/NH/WH calls, and KP/NP/WP calls. I am personally not aware of rules in other countries that are similar--perhaps someone else can offer some information.

73,
Steve
W3HF
Logged
CU2AAV
Member

Posts: 6




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: August 29, 2003, 09:41:58 AM »

Thanks for the Info!
It was not necessary that much but OK, its your system, I will not opose to it in anyway, but... I will keep desagreeing, and keep saying it dificults "hunters" specialy young, unexperient ones...like me , hi!

About "Violating" .... Who said that??, it wanst me for sure, what I was refering was to the DXCC List...I regulate myself by IT!
Also, EXCUSE me...(My english migth not be perfect, specaily on the context mather...)I am portuguese!!

About, the other countires systems, well I can talk about mine...
When you talk with a CT your talking with Portugal, mainland...
When you talk with a CT3 or CT9 your talking with Madeira Island
When you talk with CU0/1/2/3/4/5/6/7/8/9... you are talking with Azores Islands, and each one respectively..
Thats all I know for now, also you migth get a few "Special" Calsigns to SES, etc...

Sorry If I offended anyone, I only came here to ask a question, Thas all... :-|

73 de Ricardo
CU2AAV
Logged
W3HF
Member

Posts: 694


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #9 on: August 29, 2003, 12:13:45 PM »

Ricardo -

You did not offend me, and I apologize for using the the word "violated" if that offended you. I was trying to address your question where you used the words "goes against all I have study" and you referred to the IARU.

The problem is that the IARU, and ARRL DXCC have no authority to tell individual countries what to do. And the United States decided about 25 years ago to let people with geographically-distinctive prefixes move without changing their callsigns. Yes, that change hurts all of us. (I remember the first time I heard a KH6 on the air, and it turned out to be someone in Florida!)

Thank you for your explanation about the Potuguese callsigns. What you have described is completely consistent with all I have read. But that system is good only because the Portuguese government continues to implement it. If Portugal were to change its rules, as the United States did, more confusion would result. But Portugal has the authority to do that, because the only international rules are that all prefixes from CQ to CU are assigned by Portugal. I just hope they don't make the change--things are confusing enough as they are.

Steve

P.S. Your English is fine, much much better than anything I might try in Portuguese.
Logged
N8UZE
Member

Posts: 1524




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: August 29, 2003, 12:24:54 PM »

In order to improve your odds of getting Alaska, you can indicate Alaska only when you call CQ.  Here is an example using my call sign:

"CQ Alaska CQ Alaska this is N8UZE"

This way everyone knows what you are looking for.

Note that you might get a response from someone who is in Alaska but does not have a KL prefix.  They might have gotten licensed in another part of the US and kept their call sign when they moved.  For awards such as DXCC, they don't go by the call sign of the station.  They go by the location of the other station.

If a person is operating at a different location than there home, they should write it on the QSL card.  For example, if I operated portable in Ontario, Canada, I would use N8UZE/VE3 and on my QSL card I would write the same thing and indicate that my location was Canada.  You would count this as a Canadian contact, not a US contact.
Logged
CU2AAV
Member

Posts: 6




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: August 29, 2003, 01:32:30 PM »

Hi Dee, and Steve!
Thank you again, ok language sometimes can be a barrier, but I beleive that with a couple of tryes we manage to understand eachother...

Ok I realy hope Portugal stays at it is, indeed, and Also hope someday US and other possible countries in same situation, can figure a way to change this, in fact I beleive things would work better if all world could work around this and make it simpler... I wonder if the number of hams someday reaches the three letter sufix limit and has to go to a fourth hi hi, that would be crasy! (you never know)
Ok one thing to add about the CU prefixes...
ALL CU0 are suposed to be Class C, this class limitates hams to Repeaters and V/UHF with 150W limit... Also I have a vague Idea that some special calsigns could be issued (wrongly, in my opinion) as CU0 too, not sure! And CU0 can be at any Island, there is no distition in class C...

About Using after your call the prefix of where you are, also here is the same thing...
Example, if I am in Santa Maria, the call line should be: "CQ de CU2AAV/CU1..."

Well, thanks again...
73 de Riccardo
CU2AAV
Logged
W5HTW
Member

Posts: 729


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #12 on: August 30, 2003, 04:33:27 PM »

It would almost make sense if the US simply eliminated the call sign districts.  I think one possible reason for the way it is done today is we had become a mobile society, moving often, and the number of hams who moved frequently (I was one of them) and needed a new call sign, was increasing, which increased the time spent on ham licensing by the FCC.  Making it possible to keep your call sign no matter where you moved within the lower 48 states simplified things to a degree, though, of course, they still had to correct your address in their database. But they didn't have to try to figure out a new call sign for you when you moved.  

It was certainly true in "the old days" if you contacted a W6, he was either IN California, or he was operating with a "portable or slash somplace, such as "portable seven."  If you worked a W0, if he wasn't signing portable or mobile, you knew he was in the mid west.  Likewise a W4 was in the southeast.  You knew where he was by his prefix.  

None of that is true anymore, and it does appear it would be confusing to DX stations.  It is also confusing to US stations who tune the band trying to work New Hampshire and are looking for a K1, when they might find the station calling, a K9, is in NH and ready to work them!  To me, we fixed what wasn't broke, and we made it, first of all, very confusing, and secondly, useless to have call sign districts at all.  

I do have an acquaintance who has long been a KH6, but I believe just recently he actually gave that up and became a K5, though he has been living in what used to be 5-land for a number of years.  

I would guess that at some time in the future, and perhaps the fairly near future, the FCC will just turn to a sequential call system that is nationwide.

ed
Logged
KL7IPV
Member

Posts: 984




Ignore
« Reply #13 on: September 14, 2003, 01:05:31 AM »

I just renewed my KL7 call and I am good until 2013. I am not in Alaska, but if you want to make a contact there; go to 14.292MHz every day M to F at 1700Z and the Alaska net should be able to help.  Also on ten meters, 28.480MHz for KL7JGN. He is on there monitoring a lot. I hope that helps. By the way, when I call CQ or answer a call, I ALWAYS say I am in Nevada so there is no confusion. Now that I am using attic antennas due to the CC&Rs in my new home, no one will hear me anyway.
73
Frank
KL7IPV
Logged
CU2AAV
Member

Posts: 6




Ignore
« Reply #14 on: September 14, 2003, 06:41:04 PM »

Hi Frank!
No problem my friend, i "spoke" in general, I didnt mention nobody in special!
About your call, ok by me, if its legal, than its a rigth you have, but I still beleive its confuse, special for new comers, lets just hope everybody does remind to tell where they are like you!

73 de Ricardo
CU2AAV
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!