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Author Topic: The whole code/no code argument.....  (Read 1044 times)
VE6NHZ
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Posts: 15




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« on: December 26, 2005, 12:32:42 PM »

Why is the code/no code thing such a big deal?

I am a Canadian amateur with only a basic licence, however having recieved an honors mark on the exam I have access to all bands (however I still am only allowed to use the power levels of a basic)

Cw does not interest me (and I'm SURE that their are others who are not interested) at all, I don't understand why learning the code at 5wpm will give you access to all bands.  Why was that chosen as the requirement?

I intend to get my advanced licence in the near future but I don't personnally see any reason to get my code,  nor do I see why the whole code/no code thing is even an issue. My not wanting to get my code dosen't make me any less of an amateur, and it CERTAINLY doesn't mean that I'm going to go out and cause intentional harmful interference (as I have eard some amateurs suggest about "no code amateurs" in general)....
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N0IU
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Posts: 1298


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« Reply #1 on: December 27, 2005, 01:39:02 AM »

Until July 5, 2003, the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) mandated Morse code proficiency as part of the amateur radio licensing procedure throughout the world. Since that time, countries have been free to drop it from their amateur radio licensing procedure. As far as why the 5 WPM speed was chosen, I do not have the answer to that question.

Scott N0IU
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AD5X
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Posts: 1430




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« Reply #2 on: December 27, 2005, 05:42:57 AM »

I'd guess that virtually all those interested in getting a ham license had no interest in CW when they were starting out.  I certainly didn't.  But as it turns out, I operate CW 99% of the time.  To me, the advantage of 5 wpm is that it is very easy to learn (it was the speed requirement of the entry level Novice test when I was a kid).  But at least you've learned it and maybe you'll try it later on.  

All of us have to learn things we don't think we should have to.  As an engineering student in college, I didn't think I should have to take any non-engineering courses.  And since I was interested in communications, I didn't think I should have to take any power courses.  And those in non-technical fields don't think they should have to take math courses.  But all of these "unnecessary" courses help develop our longer-term outlook and interests.

People argue that those interested in CW will learn it anyway.  While I think there may be a tiny number of folks who do, only time will tell.  In today's world, no one learns anything they don't have to.  So I think it is a shame that so many folks won't be introduced to this enjoyable mode.

Phil - AD5X
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DG3YCC
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Posts: 28




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« Reply #3 on: December 29, 2005, 12:01:21 PM »

Here in germany they opened HF for radio amateurs without  cw skills in 2003. I was one of those who benefit from the new rules and it brought me back to the hobby. Licensed in 1981 I lost interest in ham-radio after a few years of VHF/UHF. But our hobby is about HF, isnt' it? So when they changed the regulations I bought an HF transceiver, put an end fed wire in the attic and was on the air using ssb. One year later I thought, well, cw seems to be a new challenge that also will give me the whole ham bands. So xmas 2004 I startet learning cw,  and in the meantime it's  my favorite mode with 99 percent of all HF contacts. Those hams who don't even try morse don't know what they miss - believe a newcomer! And I don't belong to that group of hams who can follow the code like a foreign language. Listening is hard for me but I'm getting better with each qso. Even passed the voluntary cw exam they offer here in germany so you can use the HF bands in countries where cw is still a must for HF. --... ...--  
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KF6VYH
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« Reply #4 on: December 31, 2005, 05:21:52 PM »

I passed the 5wpm code test a few years ago. I sitll think it's a waste of time to require CW for HF use. The sooner it is gone the better off we will all be. Let it go and lets get with the 21st. century. No one has ever been able to prove the CW makes a ham a better operator, becaise it does not.
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K6IHC
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Posts: 65




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« Reply #5 on: January 01, 2006, 11:00:12 AM »

by DG3YCC on December 29, 2005  
...But our hobby is about HF, isnt' it?...

Really?  Tell that to the hams that experiment in the 1 GHz-and-up bands.  Tell a ham that uses the 10 Ghz band that his work is not part of the ham radio hobby...  
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W9WHE-II
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Posts: 1




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« Reply #6 on: January 05, 2006, 07:53:55 AM »

So many people argue that they should only be tested on subjects in which their interests focus. Their logis goes like this:

Since I am not interested in SSTV, PSK31, Sattelites, 1.2 Ghz, AM, HF FM, so why should MY test involve questions about those topics?

Since I am only interested in VHF HTs, why should my test involve questions about electrical safety, antennas, or grounding?

Taken to its logical end, such people might argue:

Since I am not interested in following the rules, why should my test involve the regulations?

W9WHE


 
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N1TNT
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« Reply #7 on: January 08, 2006, 04:59:41 PM »

I fully agree with KG6TGC's comment on e-ham:
"I would like to see the code dropped and for techs to be grand fathered to general ! Code just doesn’t interest everyone, not to take anything away from code but just to give more people the opportunity to dx by voice"

To all of you that learned and use code I say congratulations and enjoy it BUT please think of other hams that have no intention of ever working code but truly enjoy dxing and would love to be able to work all the frequencies.

This is especially directed to all the “old timers” who feel learning the code is a must for a license but in the same breath complain that the hobby of amateur radio is declining and we need to spark more interest to keep it alive. Not everyone has the ability to listen to dits & daas and understand what it means (frankly it gives me a migraine) and because of the stupid code rules of before, this is a big reason why many never take interest in our hobby.

Ex. I talked citizens band for years until the tech no-code came about. Since I gained my license in 1994 I never went any higher because of the code requirement and lost interest in the hobby. I’M SURE I’M NOT THE ONLY ONE EITHER! Now that the requirements have changed, I’m trying to get back into ham radio but instead of being a seasoned operator, am starting from the beginning again.

Now that the requirement is down to 5WPM I’m going to try it again just because I want to DX HF. Plain & simple, you want our hobby to grow??? Make it more attractive and less restrictive!!!
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N5LRZ
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« Reply #8 on: January 11, 2006, 05:31:28 AM »

As mentioned before the code requiremet WAS a matter of International Treaty.  It is no longer an international requirement with each country having the option to keep or not keep the code requirement.

On a personal level I am for some code requirement for an entrance level license in that it acts as a FILTER to filter out those who do not want the license bad enough.  Nothing of value should ever be easy nor should it ever be FREE.

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WILLY
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Posts: 286




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« Reply #9 on: January 11, 2006, 04:32:29 PM »

 by N5LRZ on January 11, 2006       

"
On a personal level I am for some code requirement for an entrance level license in that it acts as a FILTER to filter out those who do not want the license bad enough. "

How dare you actually use common sense?  (shudder)
Do you realize that there are people out there that will tell you that your view is absolutely WRONG?   And that they will back it up with the simple fact that they said so.


"Nothing of value should ever be easy nor should it ever be FREE. "

You'll even get arguments on this one too.  
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K6IHC
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Posts: 65




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« Reply #10 on: January 11, 2006, 04:39:20 PM »

by N5LRZ on January 11, 2006 ...Nothing of value should ever be easy nor should it ever be FREE.

Well, I guess *only* 700,000 out of over 290 million Americans think an Amateur Radio License is anything of value.
Since only hams seem to value the license, I'm not surprised at the negative reactions by a numbers of hams to a no-code/all-licenses proposal.
Most other Americans could care less about ham radio...

 
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WILLY
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Posts: 286




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« Reply #11 on: January 11, 2006, 04:46:21 PM »

 by N1TNT on January 8, 2006     

" - - -
Ex. I talked citizens band for years until the tech no-code came about. Since I gained my license in 1994 I never went any higher because of the code requirement and lost interest in the hobby. I�M SURE I�M NOT THE ONLY ONE EITHER!"

You're right.  You are not the only one lacking the discipline to learn something simple.
They're everywhere, yet you state it like it is something new.  ??


" Now that the requirements have changed, I�m trying to get back into ham radio but instead of being a seasoned operator, am starting from the beginning again."

Too bad for you that you wasted all that time.  You didn't have to.



"Now that the requirement is down to 5WPM I�m going to try it again just because I want to DX HF."

You let that stop you?   Small children can grasp this skill, you know.
But, then again, not all small children, and plenty of others,  have the discipline to do it.


" Plain & simple, you want our hobby to grow???"

Sure.



"Make it more attractive and less restrictive!!! "

Why?

That's the dumbest logic ever - referring to the "less restrictive" part.   With that logic, we might as well just mail out licenses randomly. That would "grow" things - wouldn't it?

Most everyone with common sense, in any hobby or group,  would like to attract new people WITH SIMILAR INTERESTS  FOR THE WELL BEING AND FUTURE OF THE HOBBY -  this does not include just any-old-body that comes along, especially those that have failed to demonstrate displine and dedication.


If you are serious about joining, then check out
http://www.g4fon.net .    It is highly recommended by many, and it is free.




 
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WR8D
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Posts: 165




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« Reply #12 on: January 23, 2006, 09:54:28 AM »

Ref N1TNT: Well i'm 51 now and back in the late 60's early 70's when cb was "clean" thats where i got started. I never intended to use my past as a crutch. The "filth" started showing up on cb around the late 70's and thats when i decided i wanted to take a shot at amateur radio. I'm just a dumbass coal mining dozer operator with highschool and two years of wasted time in colledge. I'd say im average. Way back then cb got me started i passed my novice exam around 80 and stayed in that class for a few years getting my code speed up. The point some of us are trying to make here is if you want it don't sit on your ass and wait for somebody to come along and give it to you. Amateur radio already has enough to attract new folks. Around here the new ones are mainly trying to turn amateur radio into their version of glorified cb. Honestly that is the case. Its not like this in other parts of the world either. For some reason here in the states many are "welfare" minded. I hate to say it that way but thats just the way it is. I know several newbies that have made fine hams but i know of many more that are just cbers with a ham license. Still outlaw, freebanding. No respect for anyone on the air "period". This is why there's such a fuss over dropping the code all together. No it has not been much of a filter. Riley will tell you himself that most the complaints he is dealing with are with hams that are advance and extra under the old code rules. My experiance here where i live is since its been lowered to 5wpm its a cb craze. I had to bring in the fcc to just keep control of my 2 meter machines. I'll not go into the spec's of that, its a long story. Code or the lack of it will not make anyone a better ham. If one has no character before making a ham license it will be evident when they finally get on the hambands. From what many of us see and hear on a daily basis it seems many coming into the hobby are as i mention above. There's a stigma with some of the new calls and the areas they live in. Many are getting new vanity calls to break away from this. Many of the bad ones are also doing the same so it never ends. A bunch of bad apples give all a bad name, its that simple. To succeed, do what ever it takes to make what ever license you want. Don't sit around and harp and wait for someone to give you anything. I guess i'm one of those examples you were talking about. I did what so many have done to make it. I've never thought for a second i was any better than anyone else for doing what had to be done. Yeah i passed 5 then 13 then 20wpm. Amateur radio is not dieing out. There is tons of new modes etc and new freq's to use. Pretty soon the sunspot cycle will finally start to go back up the mountain and the dx will be great i'm sure. Let everyone else do the crying and the waiting. Drop the i was a cber and i'm waiting on a government hand out stuff. Just study and go for it. 25 years ago i did and i've loved every minute of these past years. When you make it don't get on the air with "i'm a low code or a no code" this or that. Just get on there and make contacts and have a good time. This junk that amateur radio is dieing is brought on by those that want to make a buck off it. Thats another story. Just have fun and leave the cber crutch in the closet. 73 John one of those "ofe" ole fart extras. lol
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VA3KAB
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Posts: 5




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« Reply #13 on: January 25, 2006, 06:55:13 AM »

I'm of similar mind about the code thing. I'm 51 and just got my license a few weeks ago, the requirement here is if you pass the technical test with a score of at least 80% (I got 92%) you can access the HF bands without knowing code.

I first got interested in electronics and amateur radio when I was 15 and had the technical part down, but could not quite master the code requirement which at the time was 10 WPM, so I lost interest in it until just recently.

I am still interested in learning code and plan on doing that in the future, although getting my advanced class license is next on my list. In my opinion having a good understanding of the technical side of things is more important than knowing code, and I have to tell you I have met many old-timers who don't seem to have a clue what is going on technically.
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K2FIX
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Posts: 12




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« Reply #14 on: January 26, 2006, 05:52:05 AM »

That smell from the big outbuilding near the house, is the dead horse that is still being beaten.

Would someone please bury the horse ?  The flies are horrible !
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