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Author Topic: reciprocal license in Russia  (Read 1228 times)
KB9YTQ
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Posts: 21




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« on: December 26, 2006, 07:05:02 PM »

I am going to be studying abroad in Moscow, Russia next fall and am looking to have a reciprocal Russian license.  I have already looked into the information given by the ARRL at <<http://www.arrl.org/FandES/field/regulations/io/recip-info_p.html#ua-ui>> Does anyone else have any information that could help me obtain a Russian license or have any advise for operating in Russia?  I intend to bring my 2m/70cm HT and would like to find a place to operate on HF if possible.  Of course, this is all far in advance, but I didn't want to leave this for the last minute!
73s and spasiba (Cyrillic doesn't show up here!),
Mark, KB9YTQ
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N5LRZ
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Posts: 0




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« Reply #1 on: December 27, 2006, 04:22:20 AM »

Unless I am blind and missed it....

There is no reciprocal licensing agreement with Russia in place at this time.  

I looked under the CEPT agreement which permits operations in Euro Land and found the following under Russia.  "Russian Federation   No info  Call sign prefix to be used in Russian Federation: R / National licences equivalent to the CEPT licence: not implemented."  The key word being NOT.

So unless I missed something it appears that you are just flat out of luck.  However you might call the ARRL people and to for other possibilites.

At this time it looks like in russia you will have to earn a Russian License to operate--IF they will give you one in the first place.

N5LRZ
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WA4HBK
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Posts: 32




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« Reply #2 on: January 08, 2007, 02:18:17 PM »

I lived in St Petersburg, Russia from 1998-2002 and was given permission tooperate as R1/WA4HBK. I filled out a form that I obtained from one of the ham sites and sent it to the Russian equivalent of the FCC along with about $20 in Russian roubles. Actually you have to pay at a bank and then send them the receipt #. I thought it would be impossible since I was a member of the Diplomatic Corp but they didn't seem to have any problem with that. your biggest hurdle, which I didn't have, would be the import of your radio equipment. The Russians are still real touchy  about importing some items. You might want to touch base with the Russian Embassy in DC and see if they can give you any guidance. Remember there that 2 meters is 144-146MHZ. And the farther North you are the lousier the propagation will be. Most likely you will be living in one of the old Soviet style apartment buildings. they can be 10-12 stories high and are well suited to a beam or wire antenna. Problem will be that antennas if they are available at all are expensive some most are homemade. If you can toss the makings, less wire, for a dipole and take it with you. Regular coax (RG-8, RG-58) is scarse but they have RG-6 in abindance (everyone has a satellite system) and while it is 75 ohm I used it sucessfully on one occasion with no problems.
Russian hams are, like most hams, a real great bunch of guys and gals.

73's and good DX

Harry
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N5LRZ
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Posts: 0




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« Reply #3 on: January 26, 2007, 05:45:58 AM »

See link below, note Russia and or the USSR is not listed among the countries with which the US has an agreement.

http://www.arrl.org/FandES/field/regulations/io/recip.html
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WA4HBK
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Posts: 32




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« Reply #4 on: January 26, 2007, 02:40:42 PM »

In my comments on how to operate in the Russian Federation I didn't mean to say or imply that there was any kind of reciprocity between the Russians and the US. What I did say was that if you take your US ham license and fill out an application for permission to operate they will use that as proof of your qualifications as an amateur so there is no test involved. This has been true in many countries I have operated in which had no reciprocity with the US. Most of the African countries where I have operated were the same. US license plus application equals operating license.
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KG6HPF
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Posts: 6




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« Reply #5 on: February 20, 2007, 08:12:29 AM »

I will be traveling to Russia in August and have also been thinking of obtaining a license to operate 144/440.  I will be traveling with a group on the Volga River from Moscow to St. Petersburg.  I have looked at the ARRL documentation on how to obtain a license and am not sure what our 'national radio amateur organization' is.  Are they referring to the FCC?  Also since I do not currently know anyone in Russia how do I pay the fee for the license?

In talking to the ARRL, they informed me that the 144/440 bands are not used much in Russia.  Is this true?

Thanks,
Kirk...............
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N0XS
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Posts: 2




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« Reply #6 on: February 21, 2007, 11:51:01 AM »

Sad news.  It doesn't look like any modifications to present Russian Telecoms law has been made or is on the near horizon.  I've been working extensively in Russia for this past year and have corresponded with the president and secretary of the Russian Amatuer Union and they advise that no progress with the legislature or ministries has been made to clarify the law to allow foreign nationals with valid ham tickets to get a permit.  There seems to be some rumblings of CEPT, but this is not yet in place. I contacted the ARRL last year and they were most helpful in asking questions--but surprised to learn that as of 2005, no more reciprocal licenses were being issued. It appears to be a missing part or loophole in the 2003 Telecoms legislation and a big gray area now.  You can operate club with the friendly hams and sharing a "ham" dinner to tell tales...and enjoy the food!  
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KG6HPF
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Posts: 6




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« Reply #7 on: February 25, 2007, 05:11:57 PM »

N0XS,
This is unfortunate news but thanks for the information.  Since I am unable to get a temporary radio license I would like to take a shortwave receiver on my trip to Russia.  How difficult is it getting a receiver through Russia customs?

Regarding the food, my wife and I are looking forward to that.  Most of the meals will be on the ship, however, we will have three days in Moscow and two days in St. Petersburg.  I hope to try a few of the local restaurants while there.
Thanks,
Kirk..............  
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WA4HBK
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Posts: 32




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« Reply #8 on: February 25, 2007, 05:53:39 PM »

I left St Petersburg on Dec 02 but there are some excellent restaurant there. During the summer they tend to go up in price a bit. The Grand Hotel Europe had three good restaurants then. Advantage of eating there is English menus, right across the street from Gostini Dvor which is a large triangular building full of indoor shops, an two blocks from the Church of the Spilled Blood, this church looks like something out of Disney World. Also right behind the church is the souvenir market. There is just about everything for sale. As for a shortwave receiver I don't think there would be any problem with that.

Enjoy the trip...Harry
WA4HBK
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KG6HPF
Member

Posts: 6




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« Reply #9 on: March 05, 2007, 01:55:40 PM »

Thanks for the St. Petersburg restaurants, Harry.  Recently I looked online and found a couple of 'American' type restaurants in Moscow (TGIFriday, etc.) that I thought I could easily go to if I ran into difficulty.  I will certainly put your restaurants on my list for St. Petersburg.

Regards,
Kirk......

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WW6J
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Posts: 5


WWW

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« Reply #10 on: March 07, 2007, 09:07:49 AM »

I have been living in Moscow for almost 5 years now and despite a couple of diligent efforts, cognac and chocolates not withstanding, I have been denied an operating permit twice.  The law actually does permit the issuance of a radio permit to foreigner, but you will learn in Russia that NO is always easier than yes.  I had absolutely no trouble bringing in my Icom 706 and a shortwave radio. I didn't declare anything (lesson long ago learned) and they didn't ask.  Technically, your radio has to bear a sticker of approval from the state agency for radio, but neither I nor any of my ham friends have ever seen one.  If you should come and want to chat or even get together, my email address is simply my first name@mycall.com.  I'd be happy to share what I know of the riddle wrapped in an emigma wrapped in a mystery that is Russia.

73 è äî ñâèäàíèÿ

Jeff WW6J
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KG6HPF
Member

Posts: 6




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« Reply #11 on: April 08, 2007, 12:47:03 AM »

Jeff,
Thank you for the information.  I tried emailing you earlier but it was bounced back.  I must have misspelled your email address.
As our August trip to Russia is approaching both my wife and I are excited and anxious about the visit.  Our trip will be up the Volga river starting in Moscow and ending in St. Petersburg.  The dates are the middle of August.  I would definitely like to talk to you about Russia and, if you are in either Moscow or St. Petersburg when we are, meeting with you.  To talk with an American that has spent any time in Russia would be wonderful.
73,
Kirk
kg6hpf@arrl.net
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