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Author Topic: Trying to find my dad's old C.B. callsign  (Read 21047 times)
KU4UV
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Posts: 375




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« on: June 04, 2008, 05:11:31 AM »

Hello,
I don't know if I will catch grief over asking for this in an amateur radio forum, but I am curious to find out what my dad's old C.B. callsign was when he was licensed back in the 70's.  I don't know if there would even be an online database for this, since the FCC did away with C.B. licensing almost 30 years ago, and there were millions of licesed C.B. users back then.  If anyone out there could point me in a direction where I might be able to found out this information, please send me an e-mail.  It was growing up around my dad's c.b. radio that got me interested in becoming a ham.  Thanks!

73,
Mike KU4UV
ku4uv@arrl.net
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KA5ROW
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« Reply #1 on: June 04, 2008, 01:15:54 PM »

I am responding to your question so I can track it. I would like to know the same thing just out of curiosity for my dad too.
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KB1LKR
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Posts: 1899




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« Reply #2 on: June 04, 2008, 03:21:14 PM »

There's nothing online (e.g. archived FCC ULS database) that I'm aware of (but I've not looked hard), though there may have been published books w/ CB callsigns, like the ones for amateur signs, though they'd likely be sorted by call not name, so you'd need a rough idea of his call. I was licensed in '77 or '78 (just after the $4(?) fee was reduced to no fee IIRC, as I think I sent a check only to have it returned) as KBKT6795 (there's a couple wasted brain cells!), I don't know when they ran out the 3 letter x 4 number series though, nor when they dropped the license requirement entirely. Good luck in your quest however.

KB1LKR  
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N5LRZ
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« Reply #3 on: June 05, 2008, 11:56:13 AM »

Find their "Old" radio and look for the sticker on the case of the radio.  

It was common practice to put your call on a sticker that you attached to the underside of the CB Radio.


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N5LRZ
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« Reply #4 on: June 05, 2008, 11:56:43 AM »

But just pure curious....

WHY?
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K0PD
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Posts: 60




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« Reply #5 on: June 05, 2008, 07:44:59 PM »

Good luck in finding your info on your dads old CB license call.There is a very good chance he never bothered to get one as i believe by the 70's there were more with out a license than with since 99% of CB'er's used handles . By the way my old CB license call was KWS4676 and i honestly do not recall any one ever giving there call.As for the comment about getting a old FT 101b by another responder it was actually the 101E that was most popular.....
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SWL377
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« Reply #6 on: June 07, 2008, 03:11:36 AM »

I think your best shot is an old CB callbook. There were a few published, some were regional. My Dad's CB call was KLA0333 which he never used. He just got the paper so when FCC inspectors did a dockside boarding on his commercial fishing boat they wouldn't ticket him. Fishermen called CB radios Mickey Mouses. You'd often hear someone say during an HF call, "call me on the Mickey when you get closer."

Another approach is a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request to the FCC which might obligate them to research archived data which is not online.
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KI4ENS
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« Reply #7 on: June 09, 2008, 02:07:59 PM »

Well why not.  He probably is just curious and wanted to know something more about his dad.

My mom's was KNJ7109.  She got it in the early 70s.
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KI4ENS
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« Reply #8 on: June 09, 2008, 05:44:48 PM »

the sad thing is she got interested back in C.B. radio and wanted me to set up a station for her.  I checked the price of power-supplies and I decided I would just bring her one when I came back in town.  A month later she was diagnosed with cancer. She said that after she beat it she would get her ham license. I said I would get here a  station.  She didn't win. It was so quick,  I never even got to set her up a 11 meter station.   So I understand wanting to know the call sign.
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KU4UV
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« Reply #9 on: June 10, 2008, 09:18:03 AM »

Hi again guys,

KI4ENS,
Verry sorry to hear about your wife.  I knew there would some folks wondering why I wanted to find out my dad's old C.B. call.  I guess it was morew for nostalgia reasons than anything, since my dad never really did show any interest in becoming a ham operator.  I know that my dad did have a callsign issued to him at one time, because I remember him telling me about it.  Whether or not he or anyone else that was required to give their callsign on the Citizen's Band ever did so on a regular basis is open for speculation.  I clearly remember some of the golden days of C.B. though.  I was born in 1974, and I remember when people actually used C.B.'s just like they would use cell phones today to stay in touch and get help or information on the road.  I remember my dad had something like an old 23 channel Johnson Messenger in his company car when I was growing up in Somerset, Kentucky.  I guess growing up around the C.B. was what helped spark my love of radio.  I enjoyed C.B. when I was younger, and I later get into SWLing and then got my ham license when I was a senior in high school.  I remember my dad buying my two brothers and me some Midland 3-channel walkie-talkies when we I was maybe 4 or 5 years old.  I have a twin brother who is also a ham operator today as well.  When we were in kindergarten, we would stay at the home of a preacher and his wife after school let out around 12:00 until my mom got off work and picked us up.  The preacher was a constible or something, and he had a C.B. in his car, as well as an old Bearcat scanner that he would listen to to monitor police calls.  It is memories like this that helped to spark my love of scanners and ham radio today.  Sorry for the long article, just thought I share why I wanted to find my dad's old call.

73,
Mike KU4UV
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KI4ENS
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« Reply #10 on: June 10, 2008, 03:18:31 PM »

KU4UV,

Thanks for the kind thoughts.  It was actually my mother and not my wife.  It was last summer.  I got into ham radio much the same way.  My mom was into C.B. quite a bit and also into scanners.  People actually used them for practical communications.  I had the walkie talkies and later when I was a teen I had a 40 channel SSB rig and 1/4 wave ground plane.  
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N4VNV
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« Reply #11 on: June 11, 2008, 05:49:38 AM »

My old CB Call was KBL-0924. It WAS issued by the FCC to me in 1967, and the fee was $20.00 a year. It was MANDANTORY to have your call affixed to your TX/RX, usually on the back. Plus you received a paper copy from the FCC just like you do now for your Amateur license. If your Dad got into CB later on, say about 1976, then his call was his initials plus his Zip code. Most of us NEVER throw away our FCC paper with our assigned call on it. Look through your Dad's old papers. You might find it. There is a web site called "NightHawk" with a large group of old CB'ers on it. Maybe there is one there that remembers your Dad's call. Just "Google" nighthawk to find the web site.
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KB1LKR
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« Reply #12 on: June 11, 2008, 06:39:07 PM »

At the time I received my CB call (circa 1987) you were allowed to use your initials and zip code until you received your call sign (I never heard anyone use an FCC issued call on the air however). Might have been different in the 1960's or even into early '70's, before the exponential growth in users and the increase to 40 channels from 23.    
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KB1LKR
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« Reply #13 on: June 11, 2008, 06:40:05 PM »

Um... that should be circa 1977, not 1987!
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N9ABG
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« Reply #14 on: June 12, 2008, 04:29:37 AM »

I was just checking the forums and thought I would help you out a bit...

Any sort of license issued by the FCC is considered to be a public record.  With that in mind, the federal government has record keeping requirements and I am nearly positive that the FCC would have information that you're looking for- albeit, it may be archived in some salt mine and take a while for them to access.  

Nonetheless, I suggest that you write a letter to the FCC's Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) office requesting information on your father's license.  More information on how to contact them can be found on the FCC website:  http://www.fcc.gov/foia/.  Be forewarned though, you may be charged for the costs associated with retrieval of the information.

When you make your request, it might be neat to try to obtain a copy of the application and a copy of the license itself.  Make sure to specify that you want copies of the application and license, as they should all be on microfiche.  Also, provide as much information as possible to facilitate their search (e.g., timeframe, date of birth, SSN, station license address, etc.)

I hope this was helpful.  Good luck!
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