Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: Prev 1 [2]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Tips needed for learning CW!  (Read 2858 times)
Guest

« Reply #15 on: September 29, 2000, 06:17:15 PM »

Codequick 2000 is all you need to know (http://www.cq2k.com)

I am now a 20 wpm Extra and got there from 0 wpm using Codequick 2000.

It's easy. ANYONE can learn the code with this method. Don't waste time with anything else. Spend the 30 or 40 bucks. It really is worth it !
Logged
KB9CFH
Member

Posts: 9




Ignore
« Reply #16 on: October 18, 2000, 09:59:44 PM »

Broke bigger than Russia? Couldn't even pay attention if you wanted to? Only radio you'll afford is the walk man you picked up at Goodwill? Well then my friend, You've come to the right place. I went from Novice to Extra Class and didn't even own a radio that would pick up CW. Find whatever course you can beg, borrow, copy, or con out of somebody. I used ARRL tapes but anything will work. The trick is to make it a religion. Do it twice a day for about 15 to 20 min. Don't skip, lay off weekends, too busy, too tired, the kids tore the house apart and I have to clean, the dog ate my homework, you get the picture. Just like the advertisement says  "Just Do It"
Logged
KC8NWX
Member

Posts: 9




Ignore
« Reply #17 on: December 09, 2000, 11:41:30 AM »

Ok, I'm the original poster for this, so I'll tell you what happened.  I started out with the ARRL cd's, and I just COULD NOT get it from them.  They just seemed so cut and dried.  I just didn't care for it at all.  So then I worked some with different shareware programs, and it wasn't much better.  I needed something that would guide me some, let me know when to move on, etc.

So, I sold the ARRL cd's, added some cash to it, and bought code quick.  I used it for about a month, sometimes skipping a day just due to my schedual, or sometimes to a lack of motivation.  Well, last night I passed my code test.  Passed it on the first try, and had pretty solid copy, although I did miss two questions due to not having spent enough time on prosigns and numbers.  I definately had more than one minute of solid copy, but they weren't going to check that unless I failed the questions.

I also passed the written element, to, so now I'm a general.  I put alot into it.  Maybe not as much as some older general class operators, but I still put alot of effort into it.  Now off to pick up an Extra study guide...

Code Quick and the Gordon West books have been the best way for me.

Thanks for all the advice.  I wish I had picked up code quick back when I was first licensed.  It would have saved me alot of time and frustration.

Dave
KC8NWX
Logged
KA3VVV
Member

Posts: 0




Ignore
« Reply #18 on: December 30, 2000, 05:56:39 PM »

After you learn the code. When taking your test. You can listing out for the world is after you here the world is the answer to the test question will be there. You will only need to get 7 out of 10 correctly to pass. You will get the answer to the question.
EXP. My call sing is Ka3vvv
         My name is Tony
         My QTH is Philadelphia pa
         My RST report is 559 BT 559
         My weather is hot/sunny
         My occupation is Retired Doctor
         My power output is 75 watts
         My antenna is Wire loop
         
Logged
KA3VVV
Member

Posts: 0




Ignore
« Reply #19 on: December 30, 2000, 06:03:32 PM »

word
Logged
KA3VVV
Member

Posts: 0




Ignore
« Reply #20 on: December 30, 2000, 06:42:01 PM »

After you learn the code. When taking your test. You can listing out for the world is after you here the world is the answer to the test question will be there. You will only need to get 7 out of 10 correctly to pass. You will get the answer to the question.
EXP. My call sing is Ka3vvv
         My name is Tony
         My QTH is Philadelphia pa
         My RST report is 559 BT 559
         My weather is hot/sunny
         My occupation is Retired Doctor
         My power output is 75 watts
         My antenna is Wire loop
         
Logged
WT8Y
Member

Posts: 65




Ignore
« Reply #21 on: January 30, 2001, 01:19:43 PM »

Sure wish the Signal Corps taught code in this manor. The real answer is "time on the headset" The Army schools taught code by listening to 5 letter groups for 4 or 5 hours a day for 10 or 12 days. Guess what
15 WPM Bingo... and if you did't get it you went to cooks or tank track mechanics school. Funny, but very very few went to those schools, It isn't that ruff....
Logged
KD7KHG
Member

Posts: 5




Ignore
« Reply #22 on: June 05, 2001, 01:47:12 AM »

Hmm, I must be the only one that believes code quick has added a bad habit to my CW learning curve. Code quick did teach me code by the use of sound alikes, and I passed the code test with no problem at 5WPM in a relative short amount of time, my problem is my brain hears the melody, connects it to the soundalike and then computes to my hand then paper. All this take time, microseconds but time none the less. I have had to break myself of this and learn the meolody only, and rid myself of the soundalike. I can copy about 90% at 15 to 18wpm (now) but it has been a hard habit to break. I used a program called NuMorse to do this but feel I may be wreaked for life having used codequick. The soundalikes still pop into my head at times. NuMorse sends the character sound only.  I guess when I started learning code it was to pass the General test only, but I became addicted to CW (weird how that happens) and wanted to improve and fine tune my skills. Copying CW is music!  Learn by sound only.
Don
Logged
K2MIT
Member

Posts: 25




Ignore
« Reply #23 on: June 12, 2001, 03:22:13 PM »

I echo the Koch method.  I tried every other method.  I memorized tapes.  CodeQuick seemed like it added a step (hear sound, construct "sounds like", remember letter).

With Koch, you go from hearing to writing character without the intermediate step.

I learned in 6 weeks, 1 hour per day.  The trick is to do one hour a day (in two 1/2 hour sections) religiously.  Without constant practice, you will never get it.

What got me over the curve?  The QST article from May, 2000.  The ARRL has a JAVA applet that you can download form the files section corresponding to the story.  I used this free software to master my general code practice.

--Jeffrey, K2MIT
Scarsdale, NY
Logged
Pages: Prev 1 [2]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!