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Author Topic: Battery Charge Level Indicators  (Read 634 times)
AF4YA
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« on: December 28, 2001, 05:11:45 PM »

I am in search of an LED (or analog needle) type battery charge level indicator for a 12V deep cycle battery.

I am running my equipment off of a Marine Deep Cycle battery as well as a fan and a couple of lights. I am making a switch panel and would like to include a battery charge level indicator in the panel. This way I can see what the charge state is at any given time.

It seems that a battery charge level indicator can be found on just about all of these new back up battery packs for jumping car batteries. Finding such a thing seperate is about impossible. Does anyone have any ideas as to where I could find one?

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

73s
Nick
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W5WJP
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« Reply #1 on: January 10, 2002, 02:31:27 PM »

Why not use a D.C. voltmeter. Not as fancy as LED but should work fine.
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KC5JK
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« Reply #2 on: March 01, 2002, 04:05:48 PM »

Ideally, you would like to find an automotive type ammeter, with a center zero.  An FM stereo receiver tuning indicator meter might be adaptable too.  With a center zero (or zero at least somewhat above the bottom of the meter scale), you can read discharge as well as charge rate.
Lacking that, any small DC Ma meter will work.  The most commonly found are 0-1 DC Ma.  Put a shunt across it to convert it from Ma to large A.  I have used a piece of wire, roughly 14-guage (or zip cord) a couple of feet long, as a suitable shunt.  I switched the meter between a main and an auxiliary battery, to monitor both, with good results.  Using a VU panel meter with either the shunt or switchable resistors, I could read 0-15v and 0-100A, on either Battery A or B.
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