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Author Topic: Postcard QSL's -- Brickbats to the USPS  (Read 688 times)
N1OU
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Posts: 70




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« on: February 25, 2002, 06:07:25 PM »

I suppose that on an annoyance scale from 1 to 10 with 1 being minimal, this doesn't rank way up there.  However, under the right circumstances, it can be a royal pain.

I just got a QSL mailed as a postcard.  The ham who sent it to me meant well and was watching his expenses which makes perfect sense.  If you're active in WAS nets, particularly, mailing expenses can mount up and the bureaus are slow.  So, direct QSL's can be a good thing.

The bad thing?  The bloody post office pasted a bar code strip right over the report portion of the card!!! If I try to peel it off, the print underneath comes right with it.  I don't have a good answer for this problem and I don't advocate those hams who skip the envelope and save on postage make up for the USPS's lack of concern about it.  I feel better just grousing about it a little.  Anybody else had the same problem?

73's

N1OU
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WB2WIK
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Posts: 20558




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« Reply #1 on: February 25, 2002, 06:57:30 PM »

Yep.  It's becoming a pretty big problem, lately.  Seems most of the cards coming through have these little bar code labels on them, and they are usually installed parallel to, and close to, the bottom edge of the card.  If that happens to be where the QSL "report" field is -- oh well!

Not sure what to do about this.  An easy solution which adds nothing to the cost of QSL'ing but is an inconvenience, would be to put "report" fields on both sides of all QSL cards (front and rear) -- the USPO hasn't seen fit to screw up both sides, at least not yet!  I notice that some of the cards I get from Japan indeed have two report fields, so maybe this problem already happened over there!

73 de Steve, WB2WIK/6
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K0RS
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Posts: 705




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« Reply #2 on: February 26, 2002, 07:02:33 AM »

The thing to do about it is put the card in an envelope.  Doh.   Better yet, put it in an envelope with an SASE inside.  I know, everybody send QSL's as postcards.  Well it's a lousy practice.  I have one laying at home right now with a bar coded label right over the return address.  If you actually want replies, do it right.  I've had postcard QSL's with so much cancellation ink on them that they were illegilble.  Wouldn't it be nice if your QSL arrived in nice enough condition that the recipient actually would be proud to display it on his wall?  Sending and collecting QSL's ain't necessarily cheap.  Cutting corners can make it even more costly if it reduces your rate of return significantly.
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W5WJP
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Posts: 157




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« Reply #3 on: February 26, 2002, 01:05:25 PM »

Another way to avoid cancellation stamps and the barcode labels is to print your own stamps and mailing labels with eStamp. All the required barcodes are there and the postcard goes through just like metered mail---- no cancellation.

Or try www.eQSL.cc eventually the ARRL has got to apporve them.
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WB2WIK
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Posts: 20558




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« Reply #4 on: February 26, 2002, 01:16:20 PM »

If I really want a card back from someone, I do send it in an envelope, with an SAE and postage units of some sort.  But I'm not much of a collector anymore, so I mostly QSL only in return, but 100% in return.

Domestic cards received without an SAE or SASE go out as postcards.  Foreign cards received via the bureau go back out via the bureau.  I find myself sending 1000-2000 cards annually via surface mail, and the difference in postage cost between a postcard and an envelope is $130 to $260 a year for this meager quantity.

WB2WIK/6
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KL7IPV
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Posts: 984




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« Reply #5 on: February 26, 2002, 04:05:44 PM »

I have become a member of e-QSL and find it really convenient. The ARRL WILL acept them now. As far as mailing the cards like a postcard, I put all my info on the opposite side from the address and stamp. For those that don't do that, raise the printed portion of the card up enough that the postal stick-on is below the information when attached to the card. That should allow the psotal info to be seen and also the QSL info.
73
Frank
KL7IPV
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N4VNV
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Posts: 179


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« Reply #6 on: March 07, 2002, 07:48:37 AM »

I put mine in the freezer for a couple of hours.  Then the strip peels right off!
 I tried "eham" for about six months and it was too much trouble for my use. I just mail mine in an envelope. I make my own cards, mostly from photos I've taken from all over the World. I must have 400 different ones now. Point is, I don't want them messed up by the USPS. I'm also having some success exchanging QSL's via email with hams all over the World. I quit using the "Buro" 12 years ago.
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AG4HY
Member

Posts: 19




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« Reply #7 on: March 12, 2002, 06:34:55 PM »


have you tried to steam the thing? itsometimes works
 73 and good luck
  willie  ag4hy
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