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Author Topic: 2 Meter on cruise liners  (Read 2935 times)
`KB9YKY
Member

Posts: 2




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« Reply #30 on: July 16, 2003, 01:38:44 PM »

Yeah! Throw all the satirists in jail, that'll teach em!
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KB9YKY
Member

Posts: 1




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« Reply #31 on: July 16, 2003, 02:51:21 PM »

Kid, you are not a "satirist". You are nothing but a foolish, silly child. If you would spend half the time studying your schoolbooks, as do do playing on your mam's little 'puter, you might be fit for employment when you get a little older.
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KA5S
Member

Posts: 229




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« Reply #32 on: July 17, 2003, 04:43:56 PM »

>>The coast guard, port pilots and dock workers don't need the captains permission to operate their ht's when aboard other vessels. This also applies to tourists with cellphones on cruise ships . <<

This statement is a combinaton of misunderstanding and mistake. The Coast Guard, pilots and dock workers HAVE permission; it's granted with their authority and function. And cellphones, technically (but unenforceably) are illegal there.  FRS, CB, and Amateur Radio, too.

ANY operation of a radio transmitter aboard a ship, plugged into ship's power or not, is the responsibility otherwise of the ship's Master and, in the case of foreign-flagged ships, must also comply with the licensing requirements of the nation under whose flag the ship is registered.  Having a US license is in this case only the first of many things which must be done to operate legally aboard ship.

The ARRL has some information on operations at sea. This is mainly aimed, it seems, at US hams who are boaters theselves. See "Amateur Operation on the High Seas" at
http://www.arrl.org/FandES/field/regulations/io/maritime.html

For those of us driving onto or through a US military reservation,  operation on them is usually forbidden without prior permission -- even CB's and FRS one can buy in the Base Exchange.

BTW, many countries get angry at US tourists for our habit of bringing FRS radios with us where they're illegal.  Could make one's vacation more memorable and expensive than planned.


Cortland
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KE4IKM
Member

Posts: 1




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« Reply #33 on: August 25, 2003, 02:39:56 PM »

Just found this forum today. I'm a little discouraged, taking a cruise soon, and wanted to bring along a portable rig. I did everything by the book, asked for alien reciprocal license from the Bahamian government, no problem there. Sent written request to Norwegian Cruise Lines requesting permission to operate, promised to follow all the rules, and was given a fax back with a huge 'NO'. The letter states that my request is denied pursuant to NCL's policies, and "understand that you have been duly notified and advised that this is against our company's policies."
 No copy of any such policy was provided, but this came from the Superintendent of Marine Communications for NCL. Guess I won't be taking ANY radio with me on this one! I'll also consider another cruise line next time, as I understand Holland America has allowed amateur operations in the past.
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