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Author Topic: Reception Conditions  (Read 408 times)
WD9IKO
Member

Posts: 7




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« on: October 08, 2003, 03:32:29 PM »

Is there a simple way to find out what the
radio conditions are for today, or tomorrow?i.e. what bands are open in wisconsin at certain times?
I have just put up two antennas and cannot seem to
hear anything? One is a Isotron 10,15,20,40 meters
and the other is a 10,15,20,40,80 dipole.
Reception is terrible. Any advice would be appreciated.
SWR's are below 3.0 on both.
Is it the season for louzy radio reception or just my lousy antenna's?
WD9IKO
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WB2WIK
Member

Posts: 20559




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« Reply #1 on: October 08, 2003, 04:34:54 PM »

Find a local ham who lives nearby and compare what he hears with what you hear.  On HF, propagation is never so specific as to be bad on one side of town and good on the other.

Remember the higher bands 10-12-15-17 are mostly "daytime" bands with propagation generally following the sun (open to the east in the morning, to the west in the evening, etc) and the lower bands 80-40-30 are more "nighttime" bands where propagation greatly improves after dark.  20 meters often has good propagation at all times of day and night and is thus long considered the "king DX" band.

Lately, and I mean really lately, like in the past seven days, the higher bands 10-12-15 have been open every single day with excellent propagation worldwide, but mostly during daylight hours.  17 meters has been open daytime and well into the evenings.  Last night while chatting with stations in Los Angeles (local to me), Boston, New Mexico and Alaska, we had a "breaker" from Portugal (a CT1) who was S9+20dB join our conversation.  He was as strong as, or stronger than, the locals -- and that was around dusk, on 18.140 MHz.  (I live in Los Angeles, so Portugal is about 6000 miles -- not great DX, but always a nice surprise to hear this stuff after the sun sets.)  That was literally last night, at about 0100 UTC.

If you tune across these bands and hear "nothing," something is definitely wrong with your receiver, antenna, feedline, or all the above.  The bands have been in very good condition, and that includes Wisconsin!

WB2WIK/6



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WA4PTZ
Member

Posts: 528




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« Reply #2 on: October 09, 2003, 05:27:34 AM »

That is a very broad based comment that you can't
hear anything..... Either it is greatly embellished
or you have a serious problem with your rig. There
are websites where you can check the Solar Indexes
and propagation forecasts but you will have to learn
what all the data means. Considering how the
question is asked I'd say you have more than just
a propagation problem, you have a confidence
problem that is far more serious than the HAM stuff.
We here are not qualified to help with that problem.
May God help you  - Tim
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WD9IKO
Member

Posts: 7




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« Reply #3 on: October 09, 2003, 12:45:37 PM »

TO:
WB2WIK/6
THANKS THIS INFO IS EXACTLY WHAT I WAS LOOKING FOR.
HAVE BEEN OFF THE AIR FOR ABOUT 5 YEARS AND HAVE
FORGOTTEN ALL REQUIRED DATA. HAVE TO LEARN IT ALL OVER
AGAIN. NICE TO KNOW THE BANDS ARE OK. IT WOULD SEEM
I HAVE A UNIQUE SITUATION AS I HAVE TRIED TO DIAL
ACROSS THE BANDS AT SEVERAL DIFFERENT TIMES DURING THE
DAY AND HAVE HEARD LITERALLY NOT ONE QSO.A LOT OF QRN
HOWEVER.
AGAIN APPRECIATE THE INFO. HOPE TO CHAT WITH YOU ON
20 METERS.
WD9IKO
DAVE PATTERSON
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WD9IKO
Member

Posts: 7




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« Reply #4 on: October 09, 2003, 12:50:18 PM »

Well, it seems you have caught me.! Have been off the
air for about 5 years and have forgotten all of the
info once had as a radio ham. With the help of WB2WIK/6 have learned bands ok and situation is probably mine to solve. I am afraid it is going to
take some time.Radio is terribly silent!
Thanks for the time.
WD9IKO
Dave Patterson
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KB9IV
Member

Posts: 21




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« Reply #5 on: October 20, 2003, 10:28:32 PM »

Hi Dave,

Remember that us in the high latitudes do not have propagation as most.  I live in Minn and conditions have been stinko here........we are having a minor solar storm for the past few days. Look out at night to the north and see the auroral display.  People in 4&5 land don't have this. It's not your radio or antenna's.

Gud DX & 73,

Bill  KB9IV
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