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Author Topic: CBers on 10 meters  (Read 14058 times)
KA3VVV
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« Reply #15 on: December 30, 2000, 07:58:40 PM »

President Signs CB Enforcement Bill
NEWINGTON, CT, Nov 29, 2000--President Bill Clinton has signed legislation that permits the enforcement of certain FCC Citizens Band regulations by state and local governments. Amateur Radio operators are exempt from the provisions of the law, now PL 106-521.
Congressional lawmakers saw the measure as a way to give a voice to those experiencing radio frequency interference resulting from illegal CB radio operation. The FCC will not yield its authority to regulate Citizens Band or other radio services, however.
In short, the measure authorizes states and localities to enact laws that prohibit the use of unauthorized CB equipment--consistent with FCC regulations. This would include the use of high-power linear amplifiers or equipment that was not FCC-certificated (formerly called "type-accepted").
Specifically, the bill enables state or local regulation over the "use of Citizens Band radio equipment not authorized by the Commission" and "the unauthorized operation of Citizens Band radio equipment" between 24 and 35 MHz. FCC-licensed stations in any radio service--including the Amateur Service--are excluded from such state or local enforcement, and state or local laws enacted under this legislation must identify this exemption.
Anyone affected by the enforcement of such legislation could appeal to the FCC if they believed the state or local government had overstepped its authority under the new law. Any applicable state or local law would not preclude the FCC from enforcing regulations in a given case at the same time.
The new law also says the FCC shall "provide technical guidance to state and local governments regarding the detection and determination of violations" of any regulations localities might enact.
The bill--HR.2346 is the House version; it was S.2767 in the Senate--actually is the old Senate "Feingold bill" from several sessions ago. After introducing his original version a few years back, Wisconsin Sen Russell Feingold requested assistance from the ARRL to rewrite the measure to ensure that licensed hams could not be affected, that the bill featured a wealth of "due process" provisions, and that the concept of federal preemption over telecommunication activities wouldn't be compromised. The bill signed by the President is nearly identical to the Feingold bill.
The bill's sponsor, Rep Vernon Ehlers of Michigan said Amateur Radio operators encouraged him to introduce the measure in the House last year. Ehlers maintained that the local hams asked him to support the bill because of the bad rap they were getting from illegal CBers using high-power linear amplifiers that resulted in TV and telephone interference while the CBers involved hid behind federal preemption.
Ehlers says that when he was contacted initially by a frustrated constituent who had been experiencing TV, radio and cordless telephone interference, he thought the problem was an isolated incident. The CBer in question was using an illegal 100-W amplifier, he said, and the FCC told his constituent that it did not have the personnel to enforce CB lawbreakers around the country. Ehlers says he introduced his bill as a result.
As did Feingold before him, Ehlers asked the ARRL to review his measure to ensure that it would not unintentionally harm Amateur Radio.
The bill was amended in the Senate, which made a specific change requested by the American Trucking Association. The final version contains language with respect to CB gear aboard a "commercial motor vehicle" (as defined in Title 49, §31101 of the US Code) requiring that state or local authorities have probable cause that the vehicle or its operator was in violation of the regulations before they attempt to enforce such a statute. On the House floor, Ehlers said truckers were "worried about perhaps being harassed by improper use of the law."
During discussion of the bill on the House floor--as reported in The Federal Register--one member spoke of "rogue operators" whose routine CB radio operation at excessive power levels left victims "helpless" to defend themselves. "When these operators boost their CB power levels, it often causes bleeding into nearby frequencies," the congressman said.
The bill passed the House under suspension in September, and passed the Senate at the end of October under unanimous consent. The measure went to President Clinton for his signature on November 14.
A copy of the new legislation is available on the ARRLWeb.

 
Page last modified: 10:01 AM, 30 Nov 2000 ET
Page author: awextra@arrl.org
Copyright © 2000, American Radio Relay League, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
 
In 1-00 QST the Bill was pass.
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KB8POA
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« Reply #16 on: December 31, 2000, 05:41:40 PM »

I have a few thoughts on this...

Firstly I do not believe there would be anything illegal about an Amateur Station transmitting over top a couple of illegal CBers on 10m! Since they're not supposed to be there in the first place.

Or you can think of it another way... When an Amateur Station on 40m is transmitting ontop of a broadcast station is this act considered illegal? Nope! In ITU region 2 the Amateur Service is a primary user of the 40m band. Thus we also have the same rights on 10m. Especially in the case of illegal operators. We're the primary users on the band and thus everyone else has to accept interference from us and not cause any to us.

So I say go for it. Start talking ontop of those illegals! Without help from the FCC about the best we're going to do is to make it an annoying experience for them.

And as for Amateur equipment falling into the hands of non-hams... Sadly I think Amateur ops themselves play a role in this. I cannot even begin to count how many times I've seen 10m rigs on e-bay or any place being sold to the highest bidder regardless of if the buyer is licensed or not. I think we Amateurs have to make a stand when it comes to selling our used gear. We should not be selling transmitters to non-hams! Especially online! Who knows where this stuff could end up!

Whenever I sell anything with a transmitter I make it perfectly clear that I will only sell to a licensed Amateur. I think more Amateurs should make this their policy! Sure it wouldn't cure the problem, but it might help a little.

Just my two cents...

73 de Walt, kb8poa..
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KC8FMR
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« Reply #17 on: January 07, 2001, 03:23:22 PM »

I'm not trying to be tooooo technical here - but. The CB band is from 26.965 to 27.405. If someone is operating on ten meters without a license they are a bootlegger. If they arent on the CB band they arent a CB'er. Call 'em what you want, bootlegger, freebander, unlicensed operator, whatever. But they arent a CB'er if they arent on CB.

This is kind like when someone is TXing on police freqs illegally, so often the media refers to them as scanner operators or scanner hacker,,,, like a scanner can TX,,,.

If you hear unlicensed ops on 10 meters I say dust off your CW key and start calling CQ DX. And not QRP either!
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KE6BGH
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« Reply #18 on: January 08, 2001, 07:08:06 PM »

I have an unlicensed operator accross the street from me who uses modified CB equipment.  It is hard to tell what frequency he is trying to transmit on, since he runs such a crappy signal and so much power that he interferes from AF up to about 6 meters.  He bleeds through televisions, computer audio, braodcast radios, he even causes touch sensitive lamps to continually cycle with his QRM.

I have contacted the FCC repeatedly; at most they send him a notice asking if he is operating out of band.

Perhaps if the local authorities do get the tools they need to enforce violations it will help.  A number of neighbors have called the police about the interference, and they have responded a couple of times.  The closest to any enforcement action was when they cautioned one of the reporting individuals about making statements that could be construed as threats, because when the police said they didn't have jurisdiction the feloow mentioned forcably removing the antenna tower.

I am planning to start a local letter writing campaign to our US Representative to see if that will get the FCC moving.  Maybe a few dozen letters and phone calls will get some attention.  It will not be hard to get them, since this guy annoys everyone within a half mile or so.

If anyone has suggestions, legal and non-violent, about how to shut this guy down, I would appreciate hearing them.  My email is available on this site and QRZ.com.

Thanks,

Dave KE6BGH
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KX5RW
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« Reply #19 on: February 18, 2001, 05:09:45 PM »

Good story Dave. I too have a neighbor 3 blocks away that likes to agitate CB channel 19 with a Galaxy 99 radio (100 watts) and an amplifier. The other day I was going to call 9K2ZZ at 28.495 MHz. He was 10 over S-9!!! All of a sudden I had a 20 over S-9 of splatter. I would like to think that something could be done about this. I will file a formal complaint with the FCC and see what happens. Good luck with your problem and I'll go after mine.
            73 es gud DX de Ron, KX5RW
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« Reply #20 on: February 20, 2001, 08:37:02 AM »

It's sad to see such an abuse of our frequencies. Last week I was trying to work DX on 10 cw and the band was loaded with CB'ers that were QRM'ing me. But hams are not helping the problem either. I know of two local radio stores in my area that cater to both hams and CB'ers. One of these stores is owned by a ham, the other has hams working there and both these shops are selling modified rigs that work on both 10 and 11 meters. Many of the CB'ers out there are not opening up these rigs themselves (some have them know how to mod their own rigs, but many others don't). They are getting hams to do it for them. We need to go after these dealers of bootleg gear.
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RobertKoernerExAE7G
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« Reply #21 on: February 23, 2001, 09:48:05 AM »

Lately, I've been doing a CB Trucker Daily spot, in hopes that other hams will listen to the frequency to see if the CBers are local to their are.  QST has an article on what to do when we find these people, and how to do it.

Perhapse, we can find an E-Mail adr for the FCC, and just start E-Mailing daily spots of these CBers?

Another ham, K1TTT also spots CBers on 10 meters.  
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RobertKoernerExAE7G
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« Reply #22 on: February 23, 2001, 09:48:40 AM »

Lately, I've been doing a CB Trucker Daily spot, in hopes that other hams will listen to the frequency to see if the CBers are local to their are.  QST has an article on what to do when we find these people, and how to do it.

Perhapse, we can find an E-Mail adr for the FCC, and just start E-Mailing daily spots of these CBers?

Another ham, K1TTT also spots CBers on 10 meters.  
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VE3SRE
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« Reply #23 on: March 02, 2001, 01:20:12 AM »

Hi!

This is an excellent topic!   The entire bottom of ten meters right up to 28.305 is just about unuseable at times because of the "outband" CB'ers.

There are definitely lots of "outbanders" from the U.S. and from Latin America...I don't know off-hand if there are many "outbanders" from Canada...I've only heard local "outbanders" once last summer and I successfully managed to chase them off the band by conducting "equipment tests" on the frequency they were using.  

If there is a problem with outbanders from Canada perhaps folks could let us know.  I know that east coast fishermen often illegally transmit on 80 meters.

Perhaps it might be an idea to setup a 10 meter monitoring "chat room" here on E-ham.net where folks could post monitoring reports in relative "real time".

For any enforcement action to be effective it will take alot of hams working together and able to transmit reports rapidly in "real time" in order to track down the intruders.

Just an idea!

73 de Bob VE3SRE
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KF4ZTO
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« Reply #24 on: December 13, 2003, 09:57:22 AM »

ok ok people

here's my two idea:

The 26.965 to 27.405 MHz band (at least in the Washington, DC metro area) is totally crap.  There are stations that I monitor (using a 30 year old 23-channel GM radio) that have at least 300 watts.  Channel 6 is by far the most active.  I hear these stations and they jam over all other CB activity on the channel.  I have also heard CB shops adversising moded CBs and linears on channel 19 all the time.  From time to time, i hear stations that appear to be on AM or SSB (I am listening using an FM-only scanner) from the 29.0 to 33 MHz band.  BEAR IN MIND.  The 28.0 to 29.7 MHz band was allocated for AMATUER RADIO USE.  This means use something else.  Frequencies from 29.80 to 30.55 MHz are used by the UNITED STATES MILITARY.  If I were you, I would stop going all back to these frequencies.  The 30.58 to 31.98 MHz is for forestry fire towers to use.  the 32.00 to 33.00 MHz band is also a military allocation.  The 33.02 to 33.98 MHz band is allocated to fire departments.  Well, you get the idea.  You have to understand that ham radio operators and CBers (legit users of the 26.965 to 27.405 MHz band) are not the only people that use that special 26 to 33 MHz section.  If you're gonna use that modified CB, use something like 26.7 to 28.0 MHz.  Stay off frequencies that are legit!  People use them! And my of them are public safety or government frequencies.

thank you for your concern.

KF4ZTO
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WD4RUG
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« Reply #25 on: March 10, 2004, 04:45:50 AM »

what about outbanders using       10 meter repeaters has this happen    
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KJ4JSN
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« Reply #26 on: August 25, 2011, 09:39:16 PM »

I have some clown down the street from me that throwing harmonics from 15 meters on threw 10 meters the said part about it is this guy has a ham ticket??It has been going on for over a year now on and off the guy is a real jerk i have hardly ever heard him on the the ham bands only CB.From what i could gather this moron has modified a 101 yaesu i guess for audio.I have tried to reach out to him about this but the guy is a head case.I guess the next step is a call to the FCC don't know how effective that will be??kj4jsn
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K8AXW
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« Reply #27 on: August 25, 2011, 09:51:06 PM »

Quote from:  link=topic=48173.msg331659#msg331659 date=974282940
Or, if you could find where the offender lives, just go to his house in the middle of the night, and either rip down his antenna, or take red paint and write "FCC CHECK HERE" across the side/front of his house.  Then maybe he will get the message.

You sound like my wife! 
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WY3X
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« Reply #28 on: August 28, 2011, 01:56:26 PM »

I have some clown down the street from me that throwing harmonics from 15 meters on *threw* 10 meters

I guess you "caught" them, eh?
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K2OWK
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« Reply #29 on: August 28, 2011, 09:09:49 PM »

I have to make a comment on the selling of Ham Radio equipment on EBay or anyware else. First you do not need a ham license to own  a ham radio equipment. However you do need a license to operate it. For example a ham club can set up a station with its own call letters (W1AW) and the owner of the station does not need to have a license, but anyone who operates the station has to have the appropriate license or a person with the appropriate license must control the station if an unlicensed operator uses it. I would guess (I may be wrong), but you can by a transceiver from any ham radio store with or without a license. The only exception to this is a linear amplifier that goes to the 10 meter band where the buyer has to show a ham license to get the mod. kit for it for 10 meter operation. The basic linear can be bought by anyone. I bought my transmitter and my receiver before I had my ham license. I know many future operators that buy transceivers from ham supply stores and from EBay. They do not transmitt, but just listen to the bands to learn operating procedure, and to familiarize themselves with the equipment. I would never penalize individuals who want to purchase equipment, because some illegally operating criminals (and they are criminals) do what they they do.

73s

K2OWK 
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