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Author Topic: connecting mobile power  (Read 918 times)
KA3VJY
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Posts: 1




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« on: July 16, 2006, 09:10:15 AM »

I am about to purchase an ICOM 2200 and would like to connect it directly to my Toyota Avalon. I was told that the cig lighter isn't reliable for high power.

Can someone please provide pointers on how to direct-connect it to my battery/the fuse box?

Thanks!
Joe KA3VJY
j.wetstein@ieee.org
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HA5RXZ
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Posts: 380




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« Reply #1 on: July 16, 2006, 10:29:28 AM »

You're right, connecting rig power to the cigarette lighter socket is a bad idea.

See http://www.k0bg.com for lots of ideas.

HA5RXZ
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W3LK
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Posts: 5639




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« Reply #2 on: July 16, 2006, 12:25:56 PM »

<< Can someone please provide pointers on how to direct-connect it to my battery/the fuse box? >>

Go to www.k0bg.com and you'll find all the information you need for your installation.

73,

Lon - W3LK
Baltimore, Maryland
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A smoking section in a restaurant makes as much sense as a peeing section in a swimming pool.
AB2MH
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Posts: 263


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« Reply #3 on: July 17, 2006, 12:55:07 PM »

k0bg's website is great for lots of ideas on mobile installations.

Any transceiver being powered by the vehicle should be connected directly to the battery with heavy gauge wire.  You should have a fuse at least 18 inches from the battery, if not closer.  Fuse both positive and negative leads.

If the supplied cable isn't long enough (it rarely ever is) for your average 50w VHF/UHF transceiver, I'd recommend 10AWG wire.  For HF transceivers (100 watts), get 6AWG wire.  Try to get THHN oil and gas resistant wire.  Home depot sells this.  

Fuse both negative and positive leads.  

Get split tubing (home depot or radioshack sells this) and cover your wiring.  Use electrical tape to seal the deal.
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KE4DRN
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Posts: 3746




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« Reply #4 on: July 17, 2006, 07:31:26 PM »

hi,

if you can, run the #6 thhn, should you want to run
more equipment in the future.

(yes, copper prices have  doubled since april)

also use Maxi fuses and holders
instead of the agc glass type.

73 james
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K7AAT
Member

Posts: 22




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« Reply #5 on: July 22, 2006, 08:08:26 PM »


  I believe most of the advice you have received in this thread is good.  One thing,  though,  running anything larger than #10 wire is insane... especially for standard VHF/UHF equipment.  Assuming a normal run directly from vehicle console area to battery,  #14, or #12 is totally adequate.  In all my years of commercial installation work,  I've never seen commercial 100W equipment that ever came with over #10 cables.... even for long battery to trunk mounts.  

  Also,  since no one else advised you,   I often find that there is a large thin rubber gromet that the main electrical cable bundle from the dash to the engine compartment goes through.  Usually near where the steering column goes through the firewall.  If you are VERY careful not to pierce any existing wires,  you can usually cut a slot in this rubber to stick a pair of DC power cables through.

   Good luck.

    Ed
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