Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1] 2 Next   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: E-ham spotlight station pictures  (Read 1229 times)
WA6MQI
Member

Posts: 12




Ignore
« on: June 18, 2007, 07:50:27 PM »

Never thought I'd see day when cb radios in a ham shack where common. I a have been seeing more and more pictures in the e-ham spotlight of ham's station setups with cb radios I just want to puke! There I said it! now flame me.
Logged
K9KJM
Member

Posts: 2415




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: June 18, 2007, 10:45:43 PM »

The only reason you can't see a CB on my hamshack photo is because I have it mounted in an out of the way location. (I dont use it very often)  
I hear many discussions from a local group on 27 Mhz CB that are a LOT more intelligent, With lots less cussing than I hear on many 75 meter frequencies from extra class ham operators!
27Mhz CB, GMRS, Business band radio, Public safety radio, Amateur radio, ALL have poor operators.....

I bet you pre judge other people by things like skin color or race too.............
Logged
KB9CRY
Member

Posts: 4283


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #2 on: June 19, 2007, 05:41:56 AM »

Ain't no CB radio in my shack.  No need for it.
Logged
N7NBB
Member

Posts: 380


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #3 on: June 19, 2007, 06:00:03 AM »

I would think that should a natural or man-made disaster occur, one (yes even you) would want EVERY means available to RECEIVE or TRANSMIT messages.  There are a lot of "EYES" out there, in homes and on the road, that are perfectly capable of communicating needs or conditions but who do not have an Amateur Radio License. Despite what the E-comm "purists" may say... It is MY OPINION that even an UNTRAINED set of eyes "on location" is better than sitting miles away wondering what's happening or the extent of damage. How fitting it would be if, God Forbid, you are in need sometime out on the highway or in your home, and a CBer is there calling for help... even better if a HAM should happen to hear his CB and summon the help you need. KARMA, dude.
I have not been active on CB since the late 1960's, and I don't monitor those frequencies regularly.. but the radio is there if needed.  It's ON during severe weather (Skywarn) alerts, etc.
Logged
ALLENCB
Member

Posts: 116




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: June 19, 2007, 07:48:21 AM »

I own a CB.  It's installed in my 4x4.  Why?  Because it's the defacto standard for radio communications in the offroading world.  Many clubs won't let you join them for club trail rides unless you have a functioning CB.  A mobile HF installation that would make K0BG proud wouldn't count.  Different tools for different tasks.

If that makes me a "chicken bander", so be it.

Chris
KI4POT
Logged
KE3WD
Member

Posts: 5689




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: June 19, 2007, 10:23:57 AM »

A CB in the shack for the emergency service op can be a good thing.  

During the days following 9/11, when the truckers formed convoys to take supplies and such to NYC, it was simply amazing how the users of the band we like to criticize got it together and communicated.  Yes, some were definitely running power -- and were using it to communicate.  I'll bet a good number of them also hold Amateur tickets.  

Leaving a little (stock, mind you, not modified) CB transceiver set to a relatively quiet channel up high on the 40 channel list and squelch closed in the shack that comes on at all times when the big switch is closed has also let me know when there may be 10 meter band openings as the CB'ers beat the hams to the condx.  

I also use CB in my truck and on my motorcycle for keeping up with what's happening on the highway when traveling.  The truckers will talk about what's making that traffic pileup, you don't have to talk, just listen.  Have been able to take an exit and avoid the traffic jam many times because of that.  


.
Logged
ONAIR
Member

Posts: 1747




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: June 20, 2007, 12:24:42 AM »

   Why so unusual?  There are plenty of CB shacks with HAM radios in them!! Hi Hi!  But seriously, CB is just another band of usable radio frequencies in the electromagnetic spectrum (11 meters).  Contrary to what many hams believe, there are actually many people who operate on CB who are decent, do not use fowl language, and are courteous and helpful to others on the band.  Plenty of hams started out as CBers, and I've noticed quite a few hams who will go on CB and have local QSOs just as they would on any ham band.  The equiptment is cheap (you can buy one new for $35 at WalMart) and offers a reliable means of chatting to locals without having to tie up repeaters or other ham frequencies.  Also, CB radios are instant QRP rigs!    
Logged
KE3WD
Member

Posts: 5689




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: June 20, 2007, 01:11:00 PM »

The closets and hamfests of America are full of old FT-101s that seem to transmit somewhere other than 10 meters when switched to that band...


Just sayin'.  



.
Logged
N3OX
Member

Posts: 8847


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #8 on: June 20, 2007, 03:59:46 PM »

You've inspired me to buy a CB to put in my shack ;-)
Logged

73,
Dan
http://www.n3ox.net

Monkey/silicon cyborg, beeping at rocks since 1995.
W7AIT
Member

Posts: 491




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: June 21, 2007, 08:41:58 AM »

I also have added CB to my ham station.  There are some nice people on CB.  Its great to find out when 10 is open because CB hopping during openings.
Logged
N7RAC
Member

Posts: 4




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: June 21, 2007, 09:23:40 AM »

I have CB in two of my vehicles, on each of my ATV's, and one in the shack.  I am a HAM that feels that I am EXPANDING my frequency bands, not graduating.  Most of my family, aside me my wife and myself, arent interested in getting licensed, so using CB, AND FRS, is a viable option.  And, as N7NBB said so well, better to have another set of EYES and EARS to help with the emergency communications.  Just my 2 cents.
Logged
ONAIR
Member

Posts: 1747




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: June 21, 2007, 12:49:15 PM »

   Hey, once upon a time 11 meters WAS a ham band!  There is no reason hams cannot still use it as a viable means of having local low power QSOs, helpng local motorists with directions and/or emergencies, or even enlightening or encouraging local CBers to graduate up to the ham ranks.  Back in the '60s and '70s, CB radio was the starting point for huge numbers of new hams.
Logged
NG0K
Member

Posts: 334




Ignore
« Reply #12 on: June 22, 2007, 08:27:45 AM »

Hey, maybe I'll get a CB too.  I see lots of travellers have them. Good idea for them I would think.  I remember my old callsign when I was 16.  KZO2473. I won't tell you what my handle was Smiley

Doug
Logged

73, Doug - NG0K
ONAIR
Member

Posts: 1747




Ignore
« Reply #13 on: June 22, 2007, 07:00:40 PM »

    Come on Doug!  Mine was "Master Blaster"! Smiley
Logged
NG0K
Member

Posts: 334




Ignore
« Reply #14 on: June 25, 2007, 05:51:48 AM »

Okay, if you must know...."Purple Prairie Dog"  :-)
Logged

73, Doug - NG0K
Pages: [1] 2 Next   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!