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Author Topic: Sears Roadtalker 40 SSB Microphone  (Read 10157 times)
WB3BIZ
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Posts: 3




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« on: July 29, 2007, 08:44:29 AM »

Don't hate me because I did this :-)

But I came across a vintage Sears Roadtalker 40 base CB at a local yard sale.  For $20 it seemed like a bargain.

The microphone that came with it had the connector cut off. There are only 4 wires, I assume 2 for PTT and 2 for the mic.  The connector is a 5 pin din type.

I have a male 5 pin din that will work, but I don't know how it is wired. Would anyone know the pinout to this microphone?

Mike
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KE3WD
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Posts: 5689




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« Reply #1 on: July 29, 2007, 04:22:56 PM »

Simply take the screws out of the back of the mic case and examine the wiring color code, jot it down if you have too.  

Pretty easy to trace through PTT switch and see which wires go to the mic capsule and which to the switching.  

Also, the mic will likely be connected with the only shielded wire, separately shielded from the rest in many cases, strip back the insulation a bit and look for that.  

Typical color code is WHT, SHLD, RED, GRN with WHT being the mic positive, SHLD being gnd and RED and GRN either being just the switch in a 4-wire.  But not always.  Opening the mic and checking is a good and surefire method.  


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KE3WD
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« Reply #2 on: July 29, 2007, 04:24:12 PM »

BTW sometimes the RED and GRN are a SPDT between GND.  

There should be a black wire in the mic line if that is the case.  Again, opening the mic and seeing the other end, you will see every wire in the cable.


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KE3WD
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« Reply #3 on: July 29, 2007, 04:26:11 PM »

If the radio does not work in receive mode with no mic plugged in, it is likely that latter case.  You can usually find two pins on the mic jack that when shorted, will put the radio into receive mode.  There will be another pin that when shorted to one of the other two will put it into xmit mode.  

Needlenose pliers on those jack pins, quickly now, can be your friend here.  


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ONAIR
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« Reply #4 on: July 29, 2007, 07:41:19 PM »

   WHY are you buying CB equipment???
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KF4ZGZ
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Posts: 288


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« Reply #5 on: July 30, 2007, 04:27:56 AM »

I have one for emcomm.
Like it or not, the channel 9 guys do a lot of good emcomm in our area. The only way a ham doing emcomm work can keep up w/ them is to have a CB. Otherwise you will be illegal.......might as well get a galaxy and a 6 pill linyer!


Matt
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KE3WD
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Posts: 5689




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« Reply #6 on: July 30, 2007, 07:55:46 AM »

>>WHY are you buying CB equipment??? <<

*Because the man wants to do so.  

*Increased communication capability, especially in rural areas where many farmers and truckers, etc. still do indeed use the band for communications of the real sort.

*Increasing an amateur's emergency communications options.  

*The Sears Road Talker SSB radio can be easily modified to work on 10 meters and that is, of course,  legal for the licensed amateur to do.  A very well designed radio, too, I might add, much better front end than many DC to Daylight portable all band wonders in use today.  

* I once converted one to 10 meter use and peaked it for the band, gave it to a now SK Technician Class ham from the old school of ham radio who enjoyed band opening contacts on it all the time using a simple wire dipole.  The old man's sheer fun and ability to operate 10 meters with his fixed income retirement made the whole excercise very worthwhile IMO.  

* It is fun.  



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WB3BIZ
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« Reply #7 on: July 30, 2007, 10:15:40 AM »

>>WHY are you buying CB equipment???<<

I don't know... It was there, looked cool, was cheap.
It was an impulse buy. Maybe it just reminded me of my youth, I remember CB being huge in 1975...

Mike
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WB3BIZ
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« Reply #8 on: July 30, 2007, 07:32:54 PM »

And yes, it is fun. That is what it is all about anyway, right?

I was thinking today of the events that led me to ham radio. It wasn't the technical fun as much as the magic of hearing those distant stations.

I remember having a toy walkie talkie when I was 11 years old. Back then they ran a few mW on channel 14. I would lay on the grass in my back yard looking up at the sky, listening to the excited voices of the distant CBers working skip. From my Pennsylvania back yard listening to voices from Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia... it was magic.

I never did operate CB. I got my novice ham ticket when I was 16. I guess the look and sound of an old CB just grought back memories.  

Doing some searching, there are some nice mods that can be made to convert this rig to the 10 meter band. I prefer CW, so I need to find a mod that allows CW.

Thanks!
Mike

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KE3WD
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Posts: 5689




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« Reply #9 on: July 30, 2007, 09:07:43 PM »

>>I prefer CW, so I need to find a mod that allows CW.<<


While it certainly can be done, it is a rather invasive and complicated "mod" -- and I put that in quotes because it would be more like a redesign than a mod.  

Lots of hassles to do that, you can't just key the PTT because of timing problems switching all those shared circuits, it gets a little complicated, but you would have to figure out a scheme to lock things down and then key from the driver or finals.  

And we haven't talked about the receiving of seedub aspect, which is a whole nuther ball o' wax.  

I'd leave that one as just a passing thought if were you -- and that comes from a nut who once designed and built a single sideband ham transceiver from the ground up, no kit.  


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ONAIR
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« Reply #10 on: July 30, 2007, 11:37:54 PM »

    I was just kidding with the CB comment.  Many hams I know started out on the CB band.  Once upon a time Lafayette and Radio Shack sold 11 meter walkie talkies with wide open regen. receivers, and kids could hear many of their local hams chatting away every night on AM!  Was a great source of free advertising for the amateur radio community, and got many a kid excited about getting their own ham ticket.
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N0RRY
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« Reply #11 on: December 08, 2007, 09:34:54 AM »

My ex Father in law gave me one recently which had been sitting in the shed for several years, so it got a good cleaning and have been using it occasionally to visit with many locals for kicks.  I don't trash other people who use CB, it's supposed to be fun, just like it is with Ham radio.  The cb'ers around here are mostly cleaning up their act, but listening in on some of our 75 meter stations lately with all the cussing going on sounds as bad as the old cb reputation.  Many time it is easier to get local information on the cb than a ham repeater that may have lots of people listening, but not responding. Anyway.....

I would like to find a manual for this thing. It is the console model, has a nice desk mic, and an excellent noise blanker incidently. If you have one or a scan to provide I would appreciate sending to n0rry at swbell dot net.
Many thanks!
Bill  
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