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Author Topic: Radio in the movies  (Read 1025 times)
KI6MPL
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Posts: 3




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« on: November 01, 2007, 01:38:15 PM »

I guess we've all seen radio depicted in various films, usually in passing, and usually wrong. I recently came across this film on the internet archives:

http://www.archive.org/details/submarine_alert

It's a pre ww2 movie about spies, radio etc. A b minus
flick, and the hero saves the day using CW.

Here's a few more I've found:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vBGIdf0VjQ4

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UKd5hupXJVo

White heat with James Cagney

Does anyone else out there have any more suggestions?

KI6MPL
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WW5AA
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Posts: 2088




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« Reply #1 on: November 01, 2007, 01:51:33 PM »

The most obvious would be "Frequency" from just a couple of years ago.

73, de Lindy
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ONAIR
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Posts: 1738




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« Reply #2 on: November 01, 2007, 11:47:08 PM »

   Don't forget the CB radio movies like "Smokey and the Bandit"!
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N0MKC
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Posts: 68




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« Reply #3 on: November 02, 2007, 09:44:08 AM »

A Hallicrafters S-20R receiver was used as a ship-to-shore radiotelephone in "Some Like It Hot"...  The handset was plugged into the headphone jack!
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KE4DRN
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Posts: 3721




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« Reply #4 on: November 02, 2007, 07:47:59 PM »

hi,

Crimson Tide

they expect us to believe that there is only
one radio for the entire sub, no backup !

Independence Day

CW help gets the word out to defeat the aliens.

Enemy of the State

images of spy sats in space, with

-.-. ..-.  -.-. ..-.
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W7IBI
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Posts: 54




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« Reply #5 on: November 03, 2007, 02:49:01 PM »

1959 film "On The Beach" had a windblown window shade and a Coke bottle sending CW from a deserted outpost  to a submarine carrying survivors of nuclear war. Yes, after finding the straight key and bottle, they understood why they could not understand the messages.
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K3NRX
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Posts: 1986


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« Reply #6 on: November 05, 2007, 12:40:29 PM »

In the very first James Bond Movie "Dr. No," one of the first scenes has a woman operating a huge tube type radio (not sure what is was) from the Jamaican office of a British spy.  The woman was preparing for the British spy, who was monitoring Dr. No's activities, to transmit his report via the radio from his island outpost to British intelligence HQ in London.  Unfortuneatly, the transmission is never made as the spy is killed while he was on his way to his office, and the woman at the radio was also killed just after she turned on the set and prepared for transmission.  The perpetrators were Dr. No's goons, hence forth agent 007 is sent to the island to investigate.

In the movie "World War III," I believe that there was a ham radio operator in the opening scene operating from Alaska who leaves his rig to go outside in a snow storm to investigate a comotion.  The comotion turned out to be an invasion of Russian soldiers who gun down the ham radio operator.

Vince P
KA3NRX


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AB3EO
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Posts: 25




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« Reply #7 on: November 06, 2007, 09:27:53 AM »

The Anderson Tapes.

Sean Connery and his gang are robbing a high end apartment building. They go into one of the apartments and find a boy sitting in a wheelchair. They decide he is no threat, so they lock him in and leave. As soon as they do the boy opens a set of doors revealing a full ham station which he uses to call for help.
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NS5M
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Posts: 196




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« Reply #8 on: November 06, 2007, 10:50:34 AM »

"1959 film "On The Beach" had a windblown window shade and a Coke bottle sending CW from a deserted outpost to a submarine carrying survivors of nuclear war. Yes, after finding the straight key and bottle, they understood why they could not understand the messages."

I thought the transmissions originated in a (telegraph?) office in San Francisco ... perhaps an "outpost" to some, but us Okies think of it as a fair-sized city ;-)
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NA0AA
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« Reply #9 on: November 07, 2007, 10:55:55 AM »

Of course, in Buckaroo Banzai Rawhide [Clancy Brown - and just for fun look HIM up on IMDB some time] utters the immortal "Crank up the Marconi and alert the Blue Blades, but NO strike teams Tommy, got that?"

Buckaroo's bus, World Watch One had a really nice command setup including radios.
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K4JC
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Posts: 76




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« Reply #10 on: November 13, 2007, 12:00:00 PM »

Has anyone else ever seen what is possibly the worst ham radio movie ever made? It's called "High Frequency" and the plot involves a teenage ham in the US who QSOs with a ham somewhere in the Alps. Bad guys get involved, there is a lot of shooting and I really don't recall how it turns out! I do remember that propagation was never an issue. The premise for the plot was OK but the movie itself was pretty bad. I happened to find a VHS copy on eBay about ten years ago and haven't watched it since!
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KE3WD
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Posts: 5694




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« Reply #11 on: November 14, 2007, 08:50:50 PM »

Before leaving Independence Day, a moment of remembrance for the two foot long straight key that was twice the size of the rig, please...
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K5CQB
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Posts: 223




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« Reply #12 on: November 25, 2007, 10:35:25 AM »

I just watched a pretty neat one last night.  It is a Korean film and the title is "Ditto", it is somewhat of a cross between The Lake House and Frequency.  I think the main radio was a Kenwood but there are several other radios in the back ground of the schools radio club room.  See if anyone can ID them.  There was also a remake of this film called Sky of Love but it didn't get very good reviews.  I plan to track it down and see what radios they used.  

I remember watching High Frequency several years ago but don't remember much other than they were playing chess over the radio.  

73,
Jim
K5CQB
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AD7DB
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Posts: 365


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« Reply #13 on: December 29, 2007, 03:42:21 AM »

"The French Atlantic Affair"

This was a 1979 TV miniseries from Aaron Spelling (executive producer). It must have been pretty forgettable because I can hardly find anything on the Internet concerning it. Telly Savalas was in it, and that's just about all there is. Based on the novel by Ernest Lehman.

The ham radio aspect of it came to my attention when I found an article in QST, August 1977, "The French Atlantic Affair", by Lenore Jensen W6NAZ. The plot called for a ham operator aboard a cruise ship making contact with other hams. In the development of the screenplay they were being careful to use proper amateur radio procedures. One sticking point was the use of authentic callsigns. They decided to use some real ones with the consent of those licensees.
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