Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1] 2 3 Next   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Poor-spelling hams  (Read 2204 times)
WY3X
Member

Posts: 768




Ignore
« on: December 29, 2007, 11:02:34 AM »

Perhaps you haven't noticed it, or maybe you have. Possibly, it doesn't matter to you at all. It seems like we have a large number of English speaking hams who appear not to be well-versed in their own language. Should we blame it on the teachers? Not really. Most of us who grow up in the U.S. aren't really paying attention in school when we're growing up. It's only when we reach adulthood that we notice the language skills of others, or the lack thereof. I'm sure someone here is going to complain that I surely have something better to do than attempt to police poor command of the English language, and you're certainly entitled to your opinion. Honestly, that's not what I'm attempting to do. I'm merely pointing out that somehow, somewhere along the way, we missed too many classes, or didn't learn what our taxes were paying our teachers to teach us. In the end, it's really our own fault for not taking advantage of what was laid on the plate before us. And I beg to differ if you think this is an improper forum, because quite a few of the transgressors seem to be some of the highest educated in our society: amateur radio operators. I'm not going to attempt a lesson here, there are books that can be found in any local library. I am, however, going to post a list of some of the most common errors I've seen. So, without further adieu, here is a short compilation of errors I've seen.

Misuse of your:
Your going to the store.
Your not going to find a better radio.
Your going to like this coffee.

In each case above, the correct choice should
be YOU'RE. Think about it- if you could say YOU
ARE and it sounds right, then YOU'RE is correct,
and YOUR is not.

Correct usage:
You're going to like your shirt.
You're absolutely correct.
Your radio is yours, and you're on the right frequency.

Manual misspelled manule.
Probably the result of mispronunciation.

Tuner misspelled tunner.
There is NO SUCH THING AS A TUNNER!
If there was such a word, tunner would
sound like TON (a unit of weight), not TUNE, which
is what we like to do with our antenna systems.

Variable misspelled varible.
This misspelling is probably caused by mispronunciation.

Sell misspelled sale.
You don't "sale" somebody something, you "sell" it
to them.

Accept misspelled except.
What I saw posted: I am willing to EXCEPT cash or a money order.
What he meant to say: I am willing to accept cash or a money order.

Terminal misspelled termanel.
Self-explanatory.

Analyzer misspelled analizer.
One for analysis. One for, well, I don't even want to
know what the seller is doing with it!

Amplifier misspelled amplifer.
It's AMAZING how many people misspell amplifier! Just do a search on eBay and you'll see what I mean!

I've seen dozens of other transgressions here and in other sale ads all over the internet posted by ham operators. I don't expect anyone to clean up their spelling errors. I think that's too lofty a goal. But just know that there are others like me out there who are left scratching our heads wondering, in some cases, what you're really selling!

I have -NOT- used a spelling checker on this posting. I'm going to leave you reading this little gem:

Spelling checker

Eye halve a spelling chequer
It came with my pea sea
It plainly marques four my revue
Miss steaks eye kin knot sea.

Eye strike a key and type a word
And weight four it two say
Weather eye am wrong oar write
It shows me strait a weigh.

As soon as a mist ache is maid
It nose bee fore two long
And eye can put the error rite
Its rarely ever wrong.

Eye have run this poem threw it
I am shore your pleased two no
Its letter perfect in it's weigh
My chequer tolled me sew.

-- Sauce unknown

OK, my flame shields are up.

73 all, -KR4WM
Logged
W3LK
Member

Posts: 5639




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: December 29, 2007, 11:59:50 AM »

I'm with you.

Illiteracy, or just plain laziness, is rampant in the world today. It's not just on eHam; it's on every forum I frequent, no matter what the subject.

73,

Lon - W3LK
Naugatuck, Connecticut
Logged

A smoking section in a restaurant makes as much sense as a peeing section in a swimming pool.
W3LK
Member

Posts: 5639




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: December 29, 2007, 12:08:10 PM »

Even more troubling to me are the large numbers of Advanced and Extra Class hams who don't know the basics of amateur radio: how to make a dipole antenna, how to connect an antenna coupler (ok, some call it a tuner) between a radio and the antenna, how to figure out the connections on a microphone plug, how to look up information in the owners manual ...

There's a ham  posting under a call sign that belongs to an Advanced class that has asked how you (1) figure the length of a dipole (2)  how to actually MAKE a dipole (3) and other stuff that used to be elementary.

It is sad.

73,

Lon - W3LK
Naugatuck, Connecticut
Logged

A smoking section in a restaurant makes as much sense as a peeing section in a swimming pool.
WY3X
Member

Posts: 768




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: December 29, 2007, 12:18:22 PM »

Good afternoon, Lon. You're 100% correct! No argument from me on any of that. I did a great deal of reading when I was growing up, and I suppose that impressed upon me the need to know proper sentence structure and spelling. With the onslaught of the internet, you'd think reading would become a major priority, but I guess folks use it for reasons other than that. Apparently people have taken the phrase "a picture is worth 1000 words" too literally! To me, a proper caption describing the photo usually includes the best information. 73, -Web (KR4WM)
Logged
WB2WIK
Member

Posts: 20611




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: December 29, 2007, 02:27:46 PM »

Eye dunno watch yore talking about.

This is all just crazey.

None spels bad heer on eham.

Logged
KB0PNB
Member

Posts: 38




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: December 29, 2007, 02:27:58 PM »

Hello,

One of my pet peeves is the unnecessary use of the apostrophe, and I see this done not only by individuals of all education levels, but also in newspapers (would one not think that they should be the experts on the nuances of the English language?)

Example (and this is a paraphrase): "Big Sale: We have hundred's of Cobalt's, Impala's and SUV's". Four apostrophes were used where none were needed.

Oh, alright... here is another: manuel = manual

I successfully completed high school (and I absolutely hated English), but have no formal education beyond that, so I don't claim to be an expert.  However, I read a lot and I listen to the Rush Limbaugh radio broadcast. I'm convinced that those two (not to, or even too) activities have given me a common sense ability to recognize what is correct and what is not. In other words, hearing and reading our language used correctly contributes heavily to one's ability to write it and speak it likewise.

Also, I am blessed with a 19 year old daughter (she loves language arts) who quite swiftly corrects me when I utter a faux pas.

By the way, she declined my offer to let her inspect this text before submission, so in the event that it contains grammatical errors, she will bear the burden of blame!

73 (not 73s or even 73's)

Mike
Logged
KB9CRY
Member

Posts: 4283


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #6 on: December 29, 2007, 03:52:31 PM »

some of the highest educated in our society: amateur radio operators.


That's an oxymoron.  Oops, didn't mean to start a dumbing down rant.

I cringe every time I see the word gotten used in a sentence.

There is no such word, even though it has been accepted in certain locations.

The word to use is received.
Logged
WY3X
Member

Posts: 768




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: December 29, 2007, 05:48:39 PM »

KB9CRY, I have to admit, you "got" me. I use "gotten". Because of your admonishment, I went to dictionary.com and did a search for "gotten". This is what I discovered:

"In British English got is the regular past participle of get, and gotten survives only in a few set phrases, such as ill-gotten gains. In American English gotten, although occasionally criticized, is an alternative standard past participle in most senses, especially in the senses “to receive” or “to acquire”: I have gotten (or got) all that I ever hoped for."

KB0PNB, we had a secretary where I worked who used to correct my use of the apostrophe showing possession of an item. And she was a retired English teacher! It's a pity I can't think of a single example at present. I've just had a wonderful dinner of prime rib and don't feel like thinking too hard. You're also correct about manuel vs. manual. Manuel is a common Spanish first name, and has nothing to do with a printed booklet. ;-)

WB2WIK, it's about time for you to write us another lead article! You've helped many of us along the path of electronic knowledge, and I commend you for your efforts.

Respectfully, -KR4WM
Logged
WB9QEL
Member

Posts: 39




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: December 29, 2007, 06:32:49 PM »

When I get ON THE AIR spelling is the least of my worries.  Right or RONG?

Get off the keyboard and get on your KEY OM.  That's just me!!

Best 73 ES God Bless!!

Nick
W9ZXT  
Logged
K7KBN
Member

Posts: 2813




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: December 29, 2007, 10:55:01 PM »

KR4WM -

Let me say that I agree with 99% of what you said.  I do have a problem with "So, without further adieu...".

It's "ado". As Shakespeare titled his play, "Much Ado About Nothing".  Not a Gallic farewell.
Logged

73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
G3RZP
Member

Posts: 4715




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: December 30, 2007, 03:48:16 AM »

Is part of the problem that people do not read that which they have typed?

'Gotten' is occasionally used over here - it's the Wessex dialect. Personally, I quite like it.

But if you get a chance, read a book called 'Eats, shoots and leaves' by Lynne Truss. Not that I totally agree with all her comments on punctuation, only 99% of them....

You will find people who tell you that 'poor English doesn't matter'. I had a boss once who said that: it was usually necessary to ask him what he meant  in his various reports and memos! If you write for magazines, you will find that the less sub-editing they have to do to get the material right, the more thay pay! Now there's an incentive....
Logged
KB9CRY
Member

Posts: 4283


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #11 on: December 30, 2007, 06:06:42 AM »

KR4WM

My understanding, which may not reflect reality, is that gotten is a word that is more commonly used in the south than in the north.  I do know that I never use, was never taught, never heard it used amongst my classmates, nor hear it used in business speak.  
Logged
N4CQR
Member

Posts: 566




Ignore
« Reply #12 on: December 30, 2007, 07:49:00 AM »

I no this have ben a pane in the wrecktum to a lots of people. It seem to be more obvous in people from Sandyago, Pencilvania and other state. Every person have there on way over their.

Sorry I just could not resist. Smiley

Wishing all the best in health and prosperity for the coming year.

73 Craig
Logged
G3RZP
Member

Posts: 4715




Ignore
« Reply #13 on: December 30, 2007, 07:50:48 AM »

'Gotten' is definitely somewhat archaic - at least over here. It probably fits the 'To more picturesque speech' bit of Reader's Digest
Logged
WY3X
Member

Posts: 768




Ignore
« Reply #14 on: December 30, 2007, 08:36:55 AM »

K7KBN, I stand corrected. My sincerest apologies! I don't think "ado" is the correct choice either. I probably should have chosen "delay". :-)

73, -KR4WM
Logged
Pages: [1] 2 3 Next   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!