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Author Topic: 98 Chevy S-10 PU - HF ant cable routing?  (Read 935 times)
KB7VNC
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Posts: 6




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« on: January 13, 2002, 03:14:12 PM »

Anyone with HF antenna cable routing experience with a 1998 Chevy S-10 extended cab pickup (RPO - ZR2 model)?

My plan:  HF ant mount will be on rear bumper to accomodate Pro Am hamsticks (for 10, 17, 20m).  Rig is a IC-706 (original type).  Radio is seperated head / RF deck behind seats.  I will run the coax from BRAID GROUNDED mount on bumper, zip-tied up underneath frame rail into cab.

What is the best way to feed the coax into the cab with out drilling lots of holes?  Are there any 'existing' feedthoughts under the cab flooring beneath the carpet? I figured a work around is to feed up under the cab and throught the firewall area, then under the dash; however this is a less direct route and will put run in closer proximity to computer module, engine noise, heat etc.  Would like to go more direct into cab from rear mounting position.

Thanks for any assistance!

73'
KB7VNC, Seattle
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KC8RTW
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« Reply #1 on: January 22, 2002, 07:48:25 AM »

     I've a 96 S-10 extended cab and am hoping to put in a similar installation.  I've got the streamlined rear bumper, so I'll probably have to fabricate a mount that bolts to the chassis and passes under the fairing on the driver's side  of the truck bed--I want something that support something more robust than a hamstick, J.I.C.  The coax will probably be secured to the frame using nylon cable ties.
     While I understand that there is supposedly a grommet on the passenger side of the firewall under the carpet, just under the dashboard, there is a hole just behind/below the glovebox where the oem radio antenna cable passes into the dash, though I'm not too certain of how large it is.
     Another option, which my local mechanic recommended, is to have a professional stereo installer handle the cable runs, as they know all the tricks.
     On a related question, where do you plan on installing the main body of your rig?  There isn't enough room under the passenger seat, nor is there enough room behind the jumpseats.  It would seem that the only other options are bolting it to the cover for the jack compartment out in the open, for all to see, or trying to shoehorn it to the firewall under the glovebox where a passenger could kick the cables free.
    The control head poses no problem, as my aftermarket stereo installation has room below it to allow me to velcro the unit to the dash--too bad there isn't quite enough room in the radio compartment in the dash to install both the stereo and the rig and allow for cooling air to circulate.

     I'll be interested to hear any other suggestions on S-10 installations put forth.

Pat
KC8RTW
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KC8RTW
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« Reply #2 on: January 22, 2002, 07:51:29 AM »

On re-reading your post, I recall that some folks have had success running coax in through the a/c exit vent between the cab and the box, but I imagine that this would require some fishing of lines behind the liner on the rear wall of the cab.
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KB7VNC
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« Reply #3 on: January 23, 2002, 03:06:13 AM »

Pat,

You asked where the RF section of radio (s) go in my S10?  Mine is a 98 ext. cab (I think you said yours is a '96 so should be similar).

Anyway, here's how it currently is set up:

IC706 (seperated) is behind the seats in rear, OPC cable runs from there beside the center console (I have the auto trans) to the front part of console between seats where the head unit is mounted on a cell phone type swivel thinggy (technical term:-)

Also, the VHF/UHF dualband RF section is also in rear and the head unit sits forward of where the Icom is.

Power cable (#6) run direct from battery, both sides 20A fused, then under the A/C comp. then through the existing OEM firewall cutout for the am/fm coax.  The hole (on a '98 model at least) is 2" dia.  I drilled just a little hole in the rubber boot to feed cable through and it seals well.  I might highly recommend the GM battery adapter kit (dealer item) that makes for a nice, clean, pro looking attachment to the battery side posts.  

My Larsen NMO 2/70 is on an "L mount" on drivers side quarter panel/hood mount, with coax going under the plastic cowl at bottom of windshield and then through driver side door jam.  No pinched RG-58 as of months of use.

So, for HF so far, I've done temporary stuff with Larsen NMO50 (6meter) on mag mount on roof, and Wilson 1000 (10m) also via magmount.  The coax in those situations goes through the rear windows and squishes the coax when it rains and I have to close the window.
Not the best for a permanent solution.

Once the WX up here in the Northwest improves (err.. summer!?) I will go at a "real" HF ant. mount and cable run.  Until then rain rain rain...

Thanks for the suggestions

73
Brad
KB7VNC  Seattle
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KC8RTW
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« Reply #4 on: January 23, 2002, 02:09:44 PM »

>>IC706 (seperated) is behind the seats in rear<<

Okay, now I'm confused.  Or possibly, I'm just using different terminology.  My 96 S-10 Extended Cab just has a pair of jumpseats that pull down from the cab walls behind the driver & passenger seats, and the clearance between the jumpseat frames and the body of the cab is, at the most, an inch deep.  Or are you saying that the RF deck of your rig is secured to the floor behind the driver & passenger seats?  I tend to toss briefcases and my laptop computer behind the seats, so I'd reallly prefer locating a rig somewhere a bit more protected.
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KB7VNC
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« Reply #5 on: January 26, 2002, 12:01:54 AM »

Sorry for the confussion.
What I meant was, yes I do have the RF part of both radios behind the passenger seat.  Additionally, both have the 'hook' side of velcro on the bottom of their brackets to keep them from sliding about on the carpet (as I really don't want to drill holes into the floor).
As for theft prevention?  I cover them with jacket whatever when not in use.  If I am parking the truck for backpacking at a trailhead or similar, I just remove ALL the rigs and take an HT.  The best theft defense - nothing to steal in the first place.

I can see your point about needing that space for briefcase/laptop etc.  It does take up the space.
I have read some similar installs where folks have built custom shelves to mount radios under, or even using a Rubbermaid storage bin.  I have thought of putting them inside one and having to cut the sides out for air ciculation - the 706 in particular gets fairly hot on tx.

A ham I work with put did put his rig inside where the flip down jumpseats go in his Ford Ranger Xcab.  He removed the seat cusions and bolted a Yaesu FT-900 HF body in there.  Looked good and hidden, but again - air circulation/cooling ??

KB7VNC

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AD0AC
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« Reply #6 on: February 15, 2002, 11:13:22 AM »

I'm probably a little late to be helpful, but on my 2000 Sonoma I ran the cable along the underside of the bed rails, through the driver-side front cargo loop, up over the front of the bed, then between the third-door and jam, then behind the plastic trim piece on the side down to the floor (it pops right off if you pull from the top down, snaps right back in), and then I hid the cable under one of those "Husky Liners" for my extended cab. It had a neat little trough that the cable fit under, then I ran it under the front seats up to my HT. This will only work if you have the third door, I guess, but those were pretty much standard on ZR2s.

I actually sold that truck a month ago and have a 2002 2-door Blazer now, so I'm trying to figure out how to rout the cable for that now too. Apparently, there's plugs on the rocker underside of the body that you can run it through up under the rocker panel, which will take it into the cab. I haven't tried this yet, but I'm not to keen on drilling holes into a brand new SUV, either, save for the front fender NMO mount. Suggestions?
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KB7VNC
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« Reply #7 on: February 16, 2002, 12:03:20 PM »

Thanks for the suggestions KD5BFE.
Too bad the '98 ZR2 I have does not have the 3rd door.
( I think it was an option till the 99 or 00 yr models, and mine was purchased used).

Anyway, I DO have a suggestion for your new Blazer!

On this same thread, see my 4th posting where I describe my way to get the front fender mounted antenna coax into the interior.  I used the existing rubber grommet / feedthrough for the stock am/fm antenna run.  It is plenty big enough and no new holes to drill in the firewall metal.

As for my HF antenna options - I think I've settled on having to drill a small stealth (~1/4")hole out the backside of cab and seal with a good rubber gromet and silicon.
Due to all the trim/carpeting at the back of cab, I think my best "drill point" would be inside the well where the rear flip down seat on driver's side is.  Bare metal there to the outside.  Once it is done I'll post how well it goes.

Brad
KB7VNC
Seattle, WA
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AD0AC
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« Reply #8 on: February 19, 2002, 06:41:24 PM »

Sounds like a good plan, just make sure you primer that hole and seal the grommet and the whole area with a quality butyl rubber, available at any home center in a caulk-style tube. My dad used to water test vehicles, and he tells me they use that stuff all over the vehicle to seal them up. Run a garden hose over the area to make sure it doesn't leak either. It may still leak and rust eventually, so monitor it closely. It shouldn't be too hard because you can see the area inside by flipping the seat over whenever it's necessary. But it is still an area with direct flooding potential from the outside, so be careful.

There's nothing worse than operating in a smelly, moldy truck. I had a bad water leak in the rear window in mine when I bought it and fortunately they replaced the smelly headliner under warranty. People who drill holes in the center of the roof are nuts, IMHO Smiley

Good luck with your install and thanks for the advice on mine!
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KB8QLR
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« Reply #9 on: February 23, 2002, 08:48:07 AM »

I had a radio mounted on a wooden base that I constructed. I wanted to attach it to the dash in such a way that I could remove it easily...I chose velcro. That's where I had a problem, but I didn't know it till the summer. I attached the velcro to the dash with glue. On a hot summer day the glue softened and many times the whole thing slid off the dash. So, if you use velcro in that kind of situation...use glue that is impervious to heat. Hope this helps a little bit anyway.
73
Joe KB8QLR
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