Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Battery power for emergency communications.  (Read 378 times)
KD5NVC
Member

Posts: 87




Ignore
« on: February 07, 2002, 08:21:10 PM »

Need a little advice on building a battery system that can handle a number of HF,VHF,UHF,inverters, lights and so forth in a mobile unit.  I do not know the load factor as of yet but if I can get a general Idea where to look and how to go about designing the system from charging to load, heat storage, etc.... this would help.

73's

Glenn
KD5NVC

Logged
WPQX931
Member

Posts: 23


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #1 on: February 19, 2002, 05:11:26 PM »

It all depends on how much you can afford.

The low end would be a few Gel-cell batteries. and a power inverter  $200.  should run 1 radio for a while. and 1 light.

you basically want to buy as much batteries as you can afford.  2AHr, 20AHr, 100AHr. etc. 100ahr= running a 100W radio for 10hrs. on xmit.  = 30+hrs of 25% xmit.

a few lights, say 1amp draw, 100hrs = 4 days.  once you have figure out how much power reserve you will need than you can figure out your price tag.

The hight end would be something like a SquareD powermanagement system which give you battery and diesel generator power...... for someone like the police department or Hospital. but who have $20K+ to spend on batteries.

The cheap alternative is to hook up your rigs to a marine/automotive battery/ies.  This will give you plenty of power for relative low cost.  The down side is that it can not be store inside your house.  or it will turn your house into the Hindenberg.  
Logged
ASTEFFES
Member

Posts: 16




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: March 02, 2002, 10:10:22 PM »

I think you really have to decide how much weight and bulk you want to deal with.  That will determine how much capacity you're going to get.  I have a 65 AHr Yuasa battery that is fairly small, but weighs 50 lbs.  It's just not practical to move this thing around, but if I had a truck toolbox to store it in, I might think otherwise.
  -Adam
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!