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Author Topic: Tuner and Whips  (Read 960 times)
N4ZYV
Member

Posts: 90




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« Reply #15 on: September 26, 2003, 05:10:34 PM »

Well, thanks guys. You've given me lots of good advice and good ideas. Next step is to just start experimenting.
It'll be a couple of months before I get the truck set up for HF but then the fun begins!
 I wish I had more experience in antenna theory and design but I just haven't been able to read through all that technical stuff.
If I happen upon the perfect radiator, I'll keep it to myself, patent it, and you all can keep me on the gravy train buying my stuff! Wink
Thanks again.

Rande N4ZYV
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VA7CPC
Member

Posts: 2406




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« Reply #16 on: September 29, 2003, 02:10:19 AM »

You might try connecting two Hamsticks together at the base to form a short (base-loaded) horizontal dipole.  This arrangement seems to work pretty well (some eham.net reviews are positive).  Try "www.hamstick.com" for the antennas (inexpensive) and the dipole mount.   And take a look at www.buddipole.com for another commercial shortened-dipole inplementaton.

How you mount such a beast (it'll be 15' long) is up to you.
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VA7CPC
Member

Posts: 2406




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« Reply #17 on: September 29, 2003, 02:10:45 AM »

You might try connecting two Hamsticks together at the base to form a short (base-loaded) horizontal dipole.  This arrangement seems to work pretty well (some eham.net reviews are positive).  Try "www.hamstick.com" for the antennas (inexpensive) and the dipole mount.   And take a look at www.buddipole.com for another commercial shortened-dipole inplementaton.

How you mount such a beast (it'll be 15' long) is up to you.
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N4ES
Member

Posts: 1




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« Reply #18 on: October 03, 2003, 11:03:29 PM »

Yes, you can use two whips in parallel to get better performance at lower frequencies. In a mobile antenna, the whip is half of the antenna, and the car is the other half, especially if the whip is at the back of the car. The whip gives vertically polarized radiation, and the car give horizontally polarized radiation. For mostly horizontal radiation, the "whip" can even be under the car, invisible to the world. Also doesn't snag on the garage door. I put an aluminum plate under the spare tire well on my Nissan Sentra and loaded it with a tuner. Worked all over on 20m. All my engineer friends told me I was crazy until I built it and showed them. To see the invisible antenna, go to http://web.tampabay.rr.com/n4es . The under car plate antenna really acts like the ground. The car is the antenna. Try your two whips. Short antennas are a capacitive coupling to the world. You are right. More is better. They will be too close to be directional on the low bands. You will excite the NVIS mode from radiation off the car, which is omni anyway, like a low dipole. Good luck and have fun.
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