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Author Topic: AA Battery Pack Corrosion  (Read 587 times)
KD7YHF
Member

Posts: 3




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« on: December 12, 2006, 02:57:03 PM »

My Handheld transceiver's AA battery pack did not clean up very well after I applied some baking soda/water mixure to it. The privous owner left the AA batteries in to long and the battery acid has started to corrode the terminals. Any suggestions on a household or commerical product that would clean off the rest of the corrosion to these terminals. Thanks.
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KE4DRN
Member

Posts: 3714




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« Reply #1 on: December 12, 2006, 04:23:48 PM »

hi joey,

the plating may have been damaged by the leaking cell(s) but Deoxit can help.

Try Deoxit brand cleaner,
litle expensive at first glance but only the
smallest drop is needed.

Great on older tube style radios and the bandswitches too.

http://www.deoxit.com/

MCM p/n 200-195
Deoxit p/n DP5S-6
this is the pump spray version, so no
hazmat ship fees.

Fry's also carry it in the stores.

73 james



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K5LXP
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Posts: 4450


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« Reply #2 on: December 13, 2006, 11:24:28 AM »

Well, technically an AA battery is alkaline, and you would use an acid to neutralize it.  But a rinse under water should take care of any residual battery goo remaining.

Unfortunately metal that has disappeared is gone forever.  About the best you're going to do is polish the tabs as smooth as possible to provide a low resistance contact.  The de-oxit won't hurt, but it won't minimize the pitting.  I would use some 600 grit sandpaper or even an abrasive pencil eraser and sand the tabs until they are as uniform as possible.  That's about as good as it's going to get, but it should be enough to restore functionality.  You may have to repeat this process periodically since the plating is gone and it will re-oxidize.  Maybe that's where the de-oxit will help.

Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM
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KB1OCC
Member

Posts: 172




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« Reply #3 on: December 13, 2006, 01:40:27 PM »

I agree with K5LXP, but would take it one step further and attempt to solder plate any remaining metal once it is sanded and cleaned.  This might enhance the electrical conductivity a bit.
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