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Author Topic: Whip mounting location on CRV  (Read 1321 times)
N0ZLD
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« on: April 27, 2007, 01:08:13 PM »

All,

I am thinking about outfitting my Honda CRV so that I can take my IC-7000 with me.  I do not plan to operate HF mobile much at all, 0 - 3 hours a month tops.  However, I would like the car to be wired ready to go if such a need arises.

In that respect, I realize drilling holes, using a Hi Q antenna with a UN-UN and amp would be probably the best solution.  Given the amount of time that I will be operating mobile however, it seems VERY cost prohibitve for me to go that route and NOT an option.  Instead, I am opting for 2 whips, one for 20m, one for 40m (http://tinyurl.com/yqtmak).  They will be tuned for use across the whole band using my LDG autotuner.

All mobile issues aside (proper grounding, bonding, coax type, RFI supression methods, battery wiring, fusing, cable routing, etc), and in a GENERAL sense..

..which mounting location would be the "best" for what my needs are?:

1) Using a lip type mount mounted to the rear door on the driver side http://tinyurl.com/2a55h5 (CRV's don't really have a trunk door per se)

2) Lip mount to the hood on the drivers side, something like this http://tinyurl.com/38mz6j

3) Mag mount on the roof

4) Your opinion here

I would utilize quick disconnects if going with options 1 or 2.

Disclaimer/Rant:
I AM aware of the severe limitations of a mobile installation/setup of this nature.  I am open to any ideas you may have provided they remain within the budget of $100-200.

Thanks for your advice,
Elijah
N0ZLD
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KO1D
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« Reply #1 on: April 27, 2007, 08:26:48 PM »

I'd look at either a Hustler or a bug catcher type antenna. If you really do not mind not being able to band hop a lot and you don't want to worry about working more than a couple hours a month go with a trunk lip you can rotate for use on the hatchback. Then guy it. Yes this is a workable thing as I have done it temporarily myself. You have to use an inductor to make it work and get a bit more broad banded with the antenna tuner.

Another option is mount a 108" whip with an SGC tuner. Out of your budget but will do what you want and will give you room for growth.

Bonding the car will make a difference as you noted.

I would avoid magmounts at all cost as there is no RF ground. (Not that a trunk lip has a great one I might add.) You could have someone whip up a metal bracket and bolt that to the car pretty cheap. It'd be sturdy, safe, reliable, and give you room for growth. Probably get it done for less than a hundred easily.

Random thoughts at a late hour.

73 es gud luk om bk

Dan S
KO1D
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K0BG
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« Reply #2 on: April 28, 2007, 05:25:35 AM »

There is much more to it than tossing he radio in the vehicle and taking off.

Lip mounts, mag mounts, and any mount not securely fastened are accidents waiting to happen. If you just can't bear to drill a hole, then look at a trailer hitch mount, or an extension off of one. The whip/coupler isn't the best solution, but in this case you're talking about casual operating, and it may very well suit your needs. However, I'd use a AH-4 with the 7000 as the methodology suggest by SGC for the 706, will not work on the 7000, and can actually cause the fan not to run properly, which can cause the finals to die!

On my web site under Auto Couplers are all of the details. You might want to look in the Photo Gallery under Other Installs. There are several CRVs shown.

Alan, KØBG
www.k0bg.com
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VE3RET
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« Reply #3 on: April 28, 2007, 05:48:12 AM »

Elijah:

I know what you mean. I have a 2007 CRV. I could not use a lip mount on the rear hatch.  On my CRV there is a plastic channel running along both sides of the roof.  Under one of the pop out covers are 2 #8 metric studs secured to the frame. I used these to mount a custom angle bracket. This should provide a pretty solid mount for your antenna. It should handle most hamsticks and maybe something even larger. BONUS.. run your coax down the hollow channel and snap the cover back  with a notch cut in it,  drill one hole in the rear door frame and slip the coax into the roof lining, over the doors and through to door post just by pulling the rubber trim and popping the rear floor moulding, To run power, drill a hole in the steering well behind the gas pedal, route behind console, under floor panel and you're done. Don't forget to fuse at the battery.  Have fun.  ALAN
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N0ZLD
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« Reply #4 on: April 28, 2007, 07:19:48 PM »

What I don't understand is, if mag mounts do not work that well and whips are absolutely worthless, or very near thereof.. then why are there countless reports and people with these types of setups who work stateside and DX?  Something doesn't add up.
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VE3RET
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« Reply #5 on: April 28, 2007, 07:54:44 PM »

Elijah:

I can see why you are confused, and I am not an expert in this field.  My understanding is that mag mounts work but have a history of flying off vehicles under stress conditions, stripping painted surfaces due to moisture concentrated under the mount and have been know to cause problems at certain frequencies due to the capacitance added from the mount, Any antenna will perform well if it is resonant, some better than others. Purists will squeeze every drop out of thier antennas. Others choose a compromise that they can live with.  I used hamsticks on my caravan that worked quite well, but because they were mounted high, kept hitting low cable tv lines.  I don't like mag mounts. They work, but I don't trust them. Too many have damaged my vehicles and flown off at high speed. F.Y.I.  There are many good opinions out there. Read them all and make your decision.  Good hamming.. ALAN
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N0ZLD
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« Reply #6 on: April 28, 2007, 08:17:13 PM »

Thanks for the reply Alan.  I am a purist.. on a budget.

If had unlimited finances and the wife did not mind drilling holes in the only car we own and I operated more than an hour a day from my car (my commute less than 10 minutes) it would make sense to drill holes and go all out.  Trailer hitch is not an option, our vehicle does not have one and I am not going to spend the money to put one on because we have no need to pull anything and to invest in one in my car soley for my antenna would only drive up the cost even more.

I am looking to have the ability to quickly put it up and take it down, that's why I mentioned mag mount.  I've read that alot of people who are using mag mounts and are able to work DX and think that they being a safety concern is hogwash.  I think a blanket approach to them is safest because once you say, sure they are ok, you will have some moron who will put up a 6 lbs bugcatcher and it will come off and kill someone.  There is the concern about it grounding properly to the vehicle, but again, why are there MANY reports of people working stateside and DX with mag mounts?  If it were true that indeed they are horrible, one would expect to NEVER find such comments.  Now, a mag mount compared to someone who has drilled holes and bonded their vehicle extensively, obviously their setup will be better.  But again, for me it comes down to how much time I may operate (most of the time none at all or maybe 3 hours a MONTH) and how much money I have to be able to put into a system like this.

I was mainly looking for an answer if a mag mount or a lip mount on the rear or hood would be best to radiate a signal using a whip, to which I did not get a real answer from what I can tell.
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VE3RET
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« Reply #7 on: April 28, 2007, 09:51:36 PM »

Sorry Elijah:

Thought you were looking for ideas for mounting on a CRV. My last vehicle was a dodge grand caravan. I set it up for HF ops using hamsticks and K400 heavy duty trunk lip mount secured to the upper side of the rear hatch. This is an excellent mount. My friend uses an ATAS on his and has had no problems. The setup worked very well coupled to an AT-100 pro tuner and my FT-857D. Chosing between the lip and magnet mount, I would go with one or more of the K400's, (if cash is a problem, COMET and MFJ make clone versions, but they are not as strong) and assuming that you can find a point on the vehicle strong enough to mount them with enough clearance at the joints to avoid damaging the paint. (My 2007 CRV does not seem to have any spot on the rear hatch due to spacing and the use of a lot of plastic and thin metal.) I had to run a ground strap to the rear hatch of the caravan, (braid is best) before I could match it. Another problem to consider is the over-all height, low bridges, garages, power lines ect. Quick-Disconnect might be a good idea. Hope this answers your question better. I would also be leary of running an hf antenna very close to the front of the vehicle. Lots of electronics to mess up or destroy there.  Lots of good advice out there, read as much as you can, then make your decision.  73 ALAN
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N0ZLD
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« Reply #8 on: April 29, 2007, 07:51:47 PM »

Alan,

Thanks for the advice!  I'll continue to research exactly where to mount it but am leaning towards the K400 type lip mount.

Cheers,
Elijah
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KF5KWO
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« Reply #9 on: April 29, 2007, 09:26:37 PM »

Elijah,

Check this URL, it's how I have my whip mounted on my CRV:

http://geocities.com/kf6iiu@sbcglobal.net/mobileant.htm

Also, bond the heck out of your vehicle.  Check K0BG.com for details.

73 de Jeff, KF5KWO
Helotes, TX
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N0ZLD
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« Reply #10 on: May 01, 2007, 07:08:10 AM »

Jeff,

Thanks for posting that link.  You seem to have mostly the same setup as what I am going for.  I wasn't sure if the K400 mounts could hold a hamstick antenna well enough.  How well are you able to work stateside and DX stations?  Do you use a tuner?

Elijah
N0ZLD
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KF5KWO
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« Reply #11 on: May 01, 2007, 05:43:33 PM »

I'm using this setup with an HTX-10, so it's only 10 meters for me right now.  I've used a 108" whip as well as a 10m Hamstick, both with just about the same results.   In one of the 10m contests last fall, I worked Australia a handful of times with only the 25W that the HTX-10 puts out.  I've worked US, Europe, and South America routinely with this setup.  Good luck!

73 de Jeff, KF5KWO
Helotes, TX
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N6JSX
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« Reply #12 on: May 05, 2007, 08:04:05 PM »

Interesting the comments that are totally off subject and trying to get you to use a different antenna and NOT answering your question.

I have a CRV - currently I made/mounted two aluminum "L" brackets that attach to either side of the trailer hitch assembly they come out to either side of the CRV just under the bumper corners - this allowed me full access to the rear door. I put 5' hustler sticks on both sides and mounted my various antennas. But due to wind loading I have nylon ropes attached between the roof rack and antenna sticks.  

Now I have a screwdriver and this bracket is not mechanically sound enough for this heavy wieght and increased wind loaded that comes with a screwdriver.

My solution is a rear door spare tire bracket to be mounted with the spare tire. My design is affectively a "T" bracket with identical wheel bolt holes pattern. This will be very solid - yes, since it is mounted on the outside of the spare tire it will need ot be removed to get the spare tire, This is the only easy mechanically sound place on the rear of the CRV. Now I need to find a "reasonable" machine shop and scrap yard defunk CRV wheel to use for pattern confirmation.

One thing that has me concerned is the depth of the spare tire bolts (you only use three) - since they are pressed into the bracket it is nearly impossible to replace them with longer bolts.

I made a CAD drawing of my CRV design - if you want it ask.  
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LID2LID
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« Reply #13 on: May 07, 2007, 10:23:57 AM »

On your CRV's, where did you route the power cable from the battery through the firewall?  Are there any existing grommets or did you have to drill a hole?  I've got a 2nd generation (2002-2006) version I'm looking to set up.

On the 2nd gen CRV's, it looks like there isn't as much room between the spare tire and rear door to fit an antenna on like on the link KF5KWO added.  I'll probably add a trailer hitch, and get an L bracket installed on the side.
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VE3RET
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« Reply #14 on: May 12, 2007, 06:48:57 AM »

I have a 2007 CRV.  I looked for an unused or under-used grommet/hole to run the power cables for my radio, but could not find any that did not present more problems then they were worth.  I finally settled on drilling a hole through the top of the hollow well located at the bottom of the steering column. To access this, remove the plastic cover behind the gas pedal.  I drilled a hole large enough for a grommet and 2 #10 power cables (Which I obtained from a local car sterio outlet, along with inline fuses and holders. The metal is very thin and it is easy to seal around afterwards. The rest of my installation was described in an earlier post. Hope this helps.

73's
ALAN
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