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Author Topic: Screwdriver vs 18wheels  (Read 946 times)
VE2QCG
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« on: July 07, 2007, 09:31:36 AM »

Hello everybody !

I bought a Icom IC-706MKIIG
and now my problem is what kind of the Screwdriver antenna I can install and use on 18 wheels truck I need 80 to 6meters antenna and very resist for the vibrations cause you know probably the problem is the vibration on 18 wheels truck !

Let me know what kind of antenna HI-Q, sierra, etc........

Thank you at all !

73s from VE2QCG  Allen the Lockpin
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K0BG
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« Reply #1 on: July 07, 2007, 12:20:58 PM »

There are a lot of factors, ruggedness is just one of them. HiQ leads the pack, but you pay for it!

Go to my web site, and look under OTR trucks. It's a good place to start, and the other articles might just help too.

The one thing you don't want to do, is do what 98% of the OTR drivers do, and mount the antenna on the mirror bracket. Which, incidentally, is the worst possible place efficiency wise. And running ground straps isn't going to negate the premise.


Alan, KØBG
www.k0bg.com
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N5DXL
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Posts: 43




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« Reply #2 on: July 08, 2007, 12:46:07 AM »

I use a HS Sidekick with a 5 foot whip and a turbo
tuner, very nice and easy setup. The setup works
good but after testing it head to head with a Hi-Q
what can I say I picked up a Hi-Q 4/80. It's at the
house waiting for me to mount it.
One thing to keep in mind is the mounting and grounding.
You can check on QRZ and see my truck and screwdriver.

Clear Skies & 73
Tom - N5DXL
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K0BG
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« Reply #3 on: July 08, 2007, 05:55:23 AM »

Tom, one of the problems every mobile operator faces, is mounting the antenna. For some unknown reason, just about everyone who gives advice to a newcomer, always mentions grounding the antenna. If you think about that for a moment, it's sort of an oxymoronic statement.

While good grounds are important for power, and certainly an HF antenna should be DC grounded to help minimize static, the real truth is, DC and RF grounds have nothing to do with with a vertical antenna's requisite ground (image) plane.

From your photo on QRZ, it is difficult to see where you mounted your antenna. Nonetheless, the fact remains, the most important consideration is, WHERE and HOW the antenna is mounted, not how well its mounting hardware is or isn't "grounded".

Alan, KØBG
www.k0bg.com
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K6IHC
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Posts: 65




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« Reply #4 on: July 08, 2007, 11:06:09 PM »

QUOTE:<The one thing you don't want to do, is do what 98% of the OTR drivers do, and mount the antenna on the mirror bracket. Which, incidentally, is the worst possible place efficiency wise. And running ground straps isn't going to negate the premise.>


I think this started with CB (11m) antennas.  It is my understanding that the OTR trucks mount the CB antenna on the mirror so that (theoretically) the trailer doesn't fully *block* the radiation pattern to the rear.  Most trucker's CB comms are to other rigs directly ahead or behind.

Of course, a vertical mobile amateur HF antenna will have different needs than a CB antenna.
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N5DXL
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Posts: 43




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« Reply #5 on: July 09, 2007, 05:15:48 PM »

Alan,
My screwdriver is mounted to the breather, the only place I
have. On the side of the body or fuel tanks would put me at
over 8 1/2 foot wide which is a big no no. The only other
place which would work is the front bumper but not a good
idea seeing how some of these kids drive now days.
The reason I point out getting a good ground is a very easy
one, most of the trucks out there have very little metal
to them. My past 3 trucks I have owned are the same make
and model but the weight has been cut from 21,000 to my new
one is 17,500 lbs. That's 3,500 lbs of metal they have removed.
You may tap into a side panel only to find no ground, so
a driver/ham has to find what works for his setup.
And if he/she doesn't own the truck (90% don't) there very
limited by how they can mount a anteena, no company going
to let a driver welded or cut into a truck believe me.

73,
Tom - N5DXL
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KD0AFK
Member

Posts: 245




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« Reply #6 on: July 10, 2007, 08:44:31 PM »

I am still trying to get the answer to the question; "how much will the metal of my truck cut down on the signal of my tarheel?"
Again, I say that everyone who DOESN'T drive a semi always wants to criticize truckers for mounting their antennas in the wrong place.
truckers have few options for antenna mounting. We don't have a trailer hitch, many of us lease our trucks so welding things to the fuel tank or drilling holes in the truck is out of the question and the signal will be so degraded that mounting the antenna to the steps on the side of the sleeper or behind it is out of the question and until someone finally answers my question I will stick to that theory. I really wish that someone who DRIVES a truck and has some practical advice would chime in on the "screwdriver/18 wheeler" debate.
And I wish that the sellers of antennas would come out with a mount for big rigs and instructions on how to best mount them.
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KD0AFK
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« Reply #7 on: July 11, 2007, 01:52:27 PM »

Just had some correspondence with the people at Hi-Q and they said that they recommend mounting the antenna to the mirror. I asked about the loss in gain due to the decrease in ground plane and they said that the loss can be measured but that I wouldn't notice any difference. I think I will trust them on this.
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N6AJR
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Posts: 9930




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« Reply #8 on: July 14, 2007, 09:43:58 PM »

the thing to remember is that any antenna is better than no antenna at all.   There is quite a few Truckers who run on the HHH net ( 7.235 at 0700 zulu) and see how mthey have doe i, also keep an eye open on the road,  there id a lot of truckers using 2 meters and 440 for local stuff and some of the 2 m nets like condor to keep in touch using a seperate 2m 440 ( even 6m) antenna for those bands.

And some even use a smaller screwdriver with a wire going to a point high and behind on the cab to make the whip "longer".

do what you can and work up from there. good luck and gud dx
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KB0USY
Member

Posts: 32




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« Reply #9 on: August 05, 2007, 09:43:41 AM »

I think I hear a ECHO.
   But when it comes to mounting remote tuned ants on big truck there are several types of antennas and different trucks.You need to assess the install your self.A lot of trial and error.I've driven all kinds of trucks and put Ham antennas on them.Some were ugly looking(Kenwood t 2000 Henry Allen bugcatcher on passenger side fuel tank)I just wished everyone has a place like we have here near Wichita,Ks.called the Yard Store.It has metal of all kinds and dielectrics in all styles.If you want to put a system on your 18 wheeler in 30 minute.Buy a HAM stick.If a remote tuned antenns in your choic.Take your time and make  strong mount and go on from there.Also take Alot of Alan's advise.He's help here many times.Just read his web site.Thanks Steve kb0usy
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