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Author Topic: Aeronautical mobile antenna installation  (Read 1352 times)
KE3WD
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Posts: 5689




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« Reply #15 on: September 06, 2007, 05:22:25 PM »

Large spin casting reel loaded with flexible copper wire makes an easy from-the-cabin release and retrieve of a trailing wire antenna.  Rhino reel.  Clamp it down.  Gator clip from tuner to wire after released.

The plastic funnel at the end is the time honored method, at one time they used metal funnels.  


KE3WD
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N3JQD
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Posts: 21




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« Reply #16 on: September 06, 2007, 05:56:31 PM »

WW5AA. Interesting setup in a Tomahawk.  BTW, it's a rental plane.  So I'm not in any position to start taping things down.  I think I'll start this project out by listening only.  My HT can receive HF. Yes, I realize all the differences between Rec. & Xmit.  But, it's a start.  Yeah, I wish I could afford a Tomahawk. I'm stuck renting. 73s Bob
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N3JQD
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« Reply #17 on: September 06, 2007, 06:02:58 PM »

KG6WOU. I'll only conduct this during VMC, cruise flight on the Autopilot.  Aviate first, of course. I don't want another person inside, just in the case of too much stray RF.  No sense risking their brain also.
It does sound like fun though, right?  Another problem is with background noise.  I'm going to check with my Heli. friend to see what they use for mics.  As he speaks to a ground crew on a VHF link.  His boss is a Ham & an Engineer. I know he has dropped a wire out of their heli. just to hear if it works. The heli. is slower & can obviously hover. Thanks for your input. Bob N3JQD
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NA0AA
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Posts: 1042




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« Reply #18 on: September 06, 2007, 07:00:57 PM »

I had no problem with the standard mic on an IC-735, but you may have to turn down the gain and speak very close to it, just as you do with the noise cancelling mic in the airplane.

Don't worry about a few minutes of stray RF, you are not going to toast anyone with 100 watts of HF.

Post photos.  I took up Ham radio after I quit flying so I never really got to do the aero mobile thing, but it would be lots of fun.
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WW5AA
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Posts: 2086




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« Reply #19 on: September 07, 2007, 07:01:52 AM »

Since I have an intercom in the Tomahawk, I just plug up the FT-900 to the passenger side intercom (simple adapters) and the radio in VOX. No audio problems at all using the aircraft head set. Very low signals are squelched out by the intercom however. Signals about S-4 or 5 break the squelch. Since I do it for fun, missing the weak signals is just a small frustration that I can live with.

73, de Lindy
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AA4PB
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Posts: 13032




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« Reply #20 on: September 07, 2007, 08:36:57 AM »

A certificated [TSO'd] radio is ONLY required when that specific radio is used to meet the type certification of that aircraft for flight. Auxillary radios such as Ham radios not used for navigation or communication with ATC nor part of the aircraft required equipment are exempt
------------------------------------------------------
This is true. Only the installation needs to be inspected by an A&P. Auxillary equipment does not need to be certified for aircraft use.
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NA0AA
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Posts: 1042




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« Reply #21 on: September 07, 2007, 01:50:42 PM »

>This is true. Only the installation needs to be >inspected by an A&P. Auxillary equipment does not >need to be certified for aircraft use.

I'm not sure about any temporary installations - we had the IC-735 on a mobile bracket fastened to the top of the survival gear box behind the pilots seat.  This may have been the only 3-pilot Piper Malibu every flown...<G>.  Since it was w/out SelCal, when we used the HF, we had to monitor the band continuously.  Something of a pain given the traffic, but cool as a one-time experience.

I think if you don't connect to the aircraft power or antenna you are entirely exempt but I don't know where the rules firmly start.  I just know there are plenty of Amateur mobile aircraft and they all have to pass Annual Inspection.  In the case of the Atlantic Crossing, they inspect every small plane  before they will accept your flight plan - Newfoundland, Iceland, Ireland....  It's an interesting list of required equipment too, including those special north sea survival suits [which you can rent to save big $$] that can keep you alive for days in freezing water.
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W6VDC
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Posts: 14




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« Reply #22 on: September 10, 2007, 09:17:53 PM »

Real airplanes have wooden spars and are covered in fabric!  I'd go the trailing wire route through the tail with a drag device at the end of the wire.  Something I've wanted to play with myself.  Let me know if you survive...
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NA0AA
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Posts: 1042




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« Reply #23 on: September 12, 2007, 07:26:49 PM »

>Real airplanes have wooden spars and are covered in
>fabric! I'd go the trailing wire route through the
>tail with a drag device at the end of the wire.
>Something I've wanted to play with myself. Let me
>know if you survive...

All those years in metal, fiberglass, and carbon fiber gliders and light planes don't count?  How did I ever get my ticket...<G>

Real airplanes don't need motors, how about that.
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