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Author Topic: Mobile Custom Installations…  (Read 1081 times)
KD4AC
Member

Posts: 81




Ignore
« Reply #15 on: March 22, 2008, 10:44:40 AM »

No, K0BG is NOT a joke.  He only stated what should be recommended.  You simply took offense to it.

I, for one, prefer to permanently install my equipment because no amount of tape, velcro or what have you, has ever held my radio equipment secure enough to my liking.  When I go to press a button on the radio, I don't want it moving.  I like a solid feel.  In today's autos that is getting harder and harder to do since more and more of the interior is plastic.  My first car (when I was in high school) was a 1971 Ford Pinto.  That had a dashboard with plenty of metal to attach radio equipment to.

Anyway, if I have to drill into plastic trim, so be it.  But I also try to find a piece that can easily be replaced should I ever get rid of the vehicle or drill my holes in locations not easily seen.  A little hobby putty and some closely matching paint and the holes will be barely noticeable.  
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WA8FOZ
Member

Posts: 187




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« Reply #16 on: March 22, 2008, 06:26:26 PM »

PLEASE permanently mount your stuff. In my earlier days during ER rotations, at a hospital that took in a lot of "crunches" (auto accidents), I saw some graphic consequences of the failure to do this: objects imbedded in people, heads and chests crushed by stuff, things like that. People have NO IDEA of the forces generated in a high-speed crash. Usually victims would come in without shoes: if they were belted, their shoes flew off; if not, they literally flew out of their shoes.....If you do not care about yourself or your passengers, please have mercy on the rest of us, who will be stuck with the $2M or so that your rehab or longterm care from a closed head injury will cost!
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ZR6RBJ
Member

Posts: 4




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« Reply #17 on: March 25, 2008, 04:20:48 AM »

As in most cases the people who are the worst offenders take the most offense, drunk drivers hate road blocks, speed demons hate cameras/lasers. Its not to say that these are as bad as leaving some equipment loose in the vehicle. But nobody should turn their nose up at the advice been given. It was not said in any way other than trying to be helpful. Obviously this is something they are passionate about, therfore they express themselves in a manner than may come accross as bossy/ overly obsessive. This is not the case. Don't mount your radios how it has been suggested, nobody will ever know. But why take the risk when all it takes is a little extra effort and some planning to insure the radio will not come loose in any event. Why don't the manufacturers take short cut, i am sure they have not heard of body mount tape either i guess...
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K1CJS
Member

Posts: 5889




Ignore
« Reply #18 on: March 29, 2008, 06:44:22 AM »

Give it up guys, there isn't ANYTHING to be gained by argument.  The purist 'permanent, solid mounting' group will not change their minds, and you people who are in the 'don't damage the interior' group won't either.  

Mounting brackets should be at least screwed securely onto the vehicle dash, but at the same time carriage head bolts aren't really necessary--unless you're mounting an 80 pound boat anchor in your vehicle.

Common sense should win out here--and it would, if it weren't a dead commodity in todays society.  If you go through life with the attitude that "It will probably happen to me", IT PROBABLY WILL.  

Don't invite trouble--don't use slip-in mounting or velcro tape mounting, but at the same time, if you feel that insecure and that threatened, for your next vehicle you should get and have restored one of those 1960s or 1970s tanks--like the Plymouth Fury, a Cadillac, or a Chevy Biscayne.  Oh, I forgot--you're crying about the fuel prices too.
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