Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Winter Mobile - Is Cold Storage of the Rig OK?  (Read 1309 times)
VE3XKD
Member

Posts: 51




Ignore
« on: October 19, 2009, 06:38:20 AM »

Hi All

I am happily mobiling HF with my Prius (worked Florida on 40 last night), but winter is coming here in Canada e.g. last night was minus 8 C and its going to get really cold in a few months. Since I have my ICOM 7000 radio installed under the passenger seat and it is difficult to take out I was wondering if it is safe to leave it there during the winter when temperatures often go to minus 30 C or will there be damage from the cold/heat cycles if I try to operate HF mobile when the radio is cold?

Does anyone have any experience with rig failure due to extreme cold?
Logged
KI4SDY
Member

Posts: 1452




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: October 19, 2009, 08:20:18 AM »

If it was me, I would not try to operate a frozen radio. I would warm the car up first with the heater and after I had been traveling for a while, then try using the radio. If I encountered any malfunctions, I would turn it off!
Logged
KI4SDY
Member

Posts: 1452




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: October 19, 2009, 08:20:35 AM »

If it was me, I would not try to operate a frozen radio. I would warm the car up first with the heater and after I had been traveling for a while, then try using the radio. If I encountered any malfunctions, I would turn it off!
Logged
K3GM
Member

Posts: 1754




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: October 19, 2009, 08:54:55 AM »

My 5+ year old FT-8900 and IC-7000 see winter temperatures down to -10F, but each starts up fine and get daily play.  I have to admit though that I almost never get in the vehicle and immediately start transmitting, not because I'm concerned about the temperature, but I have to get warmed up too!  The liquid crystal displays are a little "laggy" until they warm up.  I wouldn't be too concerned.
Logged
AA4PB
Member

Posts: 12644




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: October 19, 2009, 10:47:09 AM »

Most ICs have a storage temperature down to -65deg C so I don't think you will have any problems. You may have to let the car warm up a little before you will be able to read the LCD display. Actually, turning the radio on should help to get its "innards" up to operating temperature a little faster.

I've done temperature testing of electronic devices and never had a permanent failure from low temperature. They quit working but as soon as you warm them up they come back to life.
Logged
AA4PB
Member

Posts: 12644




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: October 19, 2009, 10:50:45 AM »

Remember, the AM/FM car radio is subjected to the same temperatures and they don't use anything special in the way of expanded temp range components.
Logged
K5LXP
Member

Posts: 4439


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #6 on: October 19, 2009, 11:44:51 AM »

The operating temperature range is listed in the specifications of the radio.

For the IC7000 it's -10°C to +60°C.

It doesn't come down to just what the parts will survive, there are tolerances to accomodate and while it probably won't "hurt" to operate the rig out of this range it may not function correctly either operationally or spectrally.

In my experience even if the rig works at very cold temperatures you won't be able to use it anyway, since the display will be nonfunctional until it warms up to a certain point (at least with LCD's).


Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM
Logged
KD4LLA
Member

Posts: 450




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: October 20, 2009, 09:19:47 AM »

I would be more worried about driving a Prius in the cold.  In 1998-99 I was in Fairbanks, AK, when the temps stayed around 50-55(F) below zero for a couple of weeks.  I never had any noticeable two-way radio, AM-FM, or a 6 Disc CD player trouble, other than slow displays.  But then again I always let the car worm up for at least fifteen minutes.

Mike
Logged
KD4LLA
Member

Posts: 450




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: October 20, 2009, 09:20:00 AM »

I would be more worried about driving a Prius in the cold.  In 1998-99 I was in Fairbanks, AK, when the temps stayed around 50-55(F) below zero for a couple of weeks.  I never had any noticeable two-way radio, AM-FM, or a 6 Disc CD player trouble, other than slow displays.  But then again I always let the car worm up for at least fifteen minutes.

Mike
Logged
KD4LLA
Member

Posts: 450




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: October 20, 2009, 09:20:07 AM »

I would be more worried about driving a Prius in the cold.  In 1998-99 I was in Fairbanks, AK, when the temps stayed around 50-55(F) below zero for a couple of weeks.  I never had any noticeable two-way radio, AM-FM, or a 6 Disc CD player trouble, other than slow displays.  But then again I always let the car worm up for at least fifteen minutes.

Mike
Logged
KC7YRA
Member

Posts: 256




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: October 20, 2009, 08:18:09 PM »

Should be no problem if you let things warm up.  Here in Wyoming we get down to -40F (which is the same C) every winter for a few days at a time.  We may stay -20F for a few weeks.

I have never had any problems except 2.  Be VERY careful stretching or using any mic cord at that temp as it will crack and break.  Also be SLOW about turning knobs on any radio at that temp.  Have had shafts break.

As others have said, let the stuff warm up before trying to use it.  


Brad
Logged
VO1GXG
Member

Posts: 60




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: January 14, 2010, 09:25:51 PM »

We get salt spray and alot of moisture in winter here on the rock and i've not had a problem with any of my exectronics in the winter. Heck you're prius has more computer gadgetry then a regular car and it works fine! I jsut don't keep HF antennas on the car.
Logged
K0BG
Member

Posts: 9834


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #12 on: January 15, 2010, 06:47:58 AM »

All specs aside John, my 7000 has been down to -2°F (-18°C), and it came on perfectly. It's also been in the sun when the inside of the Ridgeline was about 150°F (the body is in the trunk where it gets even hotter!), and the display was a little dark, but the video worked okay as did the radio.
Logged

VE3XKD
Member

Posts: 51




Ignore
« Reply #13 on: January 15, 2010, 01:07:49 PM »

After two months of winter, the installation works fine. The coldest has been minus 25  C. The only thing I don't do is keep the HF antena mounted as I am worried about salt spray damage, though VHF/UHF has been great all winter. It is also a pain to get the car into the garage with the HF antenna as there is not enough length in the garage, so I have not been doing too much HF mobile so far this winter.

cheers
Logged
KB1TGQ
Member

Posts: 3




Ignore
« Reply #14 on: February 01, 2010, 08:42:02 AM »

Think about all the public safety vehicles with radio out there.  I live in New England and it's not -30C but it does get cold and our radios always work even though they are installed in the boot of the cars.  Most radios have a safe operating range, if you are concerned a few minutes warm-up time can do no harm.

David
KB1TGQ
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!