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Author Topic: Opening the TX/RX on Yeasu FT-8800R  (Read 8422 times)
N0YCM
Member

Posts: 2




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« Reply #30 on: July 21, 2006, 06:57:19 PM »

All of the comments on legality issues surrounding the use of modified ham radio gear are important reminders of the responsibilities that come with the issuance of our licenses but they all seem to have the tone that there is something inherently wrong (possibly illegal) in modifying FM equipment for extended transmit ranges.  Of course it is illegal to transmit on commercial frequencies with modified ham gear and even more serious to cause malicious interference with any public service (or even ham) frequency, especially police, fire, rescue, etc. But it surprises me that no one has mentioned that in an EMERGENCY, any radio frequency or mode of transmission may be used.  There are many areas of the country, especially in the western national parks and other western public lands, where cell phone service is NOT available.  Such area may, however, have radio coverage by such agencies as police, fire, ski patrol, federal agencies, etc. It was indeed fortunate that just because I was in possession of an extended transmitting range 2m mobile radio, lives were quite possibly saved.  I was in the backcountry of a national park in the southwest when I came upon a jeep accident in which several people were injured, one very seriously.  There was no cell phone service, but I was able to reach the National Park Service dispatcher (I had programmed the offset frequencies and tone to access this wide coverage repeater in an emergency).  I was then able to guide rescue personnel to the scene of the accident and render what aid I could until they arrived.  Of course it helped that I had worked part time as a police officer out west and spent one summer working as a seasonal park ranger, but the outcome would have been the same for any similarly equipped amateur radio operator.  This is the first time I have ever sent an e-mail to any website or whatever you call your group, but quite frankly, I�m rather shocked by the tone of the various e-mails that people seem to have the time to send, and the failure to be equally adamant about pointing out the potential of well qualified hams with the RIGHT EQUIPMENT to help in times of real emergency! So many of you so-called righteous people seemed to have forgotten the real potential of the right equipment in the right hands!
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N0YCM
Member

Posts: 2




Ignore
« Reply #31 on: July 21, 2006, 07:00:01 PM »

All of the comments on legality issues surrounding the use of modified ham radio gear are important reminders of the responsibilities that come with the issuance of our licenses but they all seem to have the tone that there is something inherently wrong (possibly illegal) in modifying FM equipment for extended transmit ranges.  Of course it is illegal to transmit on commercial frequencies with modified ham gear and even more serious to cause malicious interference with any public service (or even ham) frequency, especially police, fire, rescue, etc. But it surprises me that no one has mentioned that in an EMERGENCY, any radio frequency or mode of transmission may be used.  There are many areas of the country, especially in the western national parks and other western public lands, where cell phone service is NOT available.  Such area may, however, have radio coverage by such agencies as police, fire, ski patrol, federal agencies, etc. It was indeed fortunate that just because I was in possession of an extended transmitting range 2m mobile radio, lives were quite possibly saved.  I was in the backcountry of a national park in the southwest when I came upon a jeep accident in which several people were injured, one very seriously.  There was no cell phone service, but I was able to reach the National Park Service dispatcher (I had programmed the offset frequencies and tone to access this wide coverage repeater in an emergency).  I was then able to guide rescue personnel to the scene of the accident and render what aid I could until they arrived.  Of course it helped that I had worked part time as a police officer out west and spent one summer working as a seasonal park ranger, but the outcome would have been the same for any similarly equipped amateur radio operator.  This is the first time I have ever sent an e-mail to any website or whatever you call your group, but quite frankly, I�m rather shocked by the tone of the various e-mails that people seem to have the time to send, and the failure to be equally adamant about pointing out the potential of well qualified hams with the RIGHT EQUIPMENT to help in times of real emergency!  So many of you so-called righteous people seemed to have forgotten the real potential of the right equipment in the right hands!
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N3UJX
Member

Posts: 19




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« Reply #32 on: July 24, 2006, 11:56:59 AM »

Brian,
I have a good source for old motorola maxtracs at  a reasonable price. i bought one from him on ebay last year and it is working flawlessly. He will even program it for free. if you are interested, email me @ n3ujx@yahoo.com, and I will give you his info.
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N4AOF
Member

Posts: 9




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« Reply #33 on: September 21, 2007, 08:52:22 AM »

A Misinformed Ham posted: "But it surprises me that no one has mentioned that in an EMERGENCY, any radio frequency or mode of transmission may be used."

Perhaps the reason no one raised that old Ham Radio Myth is because the people here who care about the legality issue are mostly people who know that the myth is false.

97.403 and 97.405 apply to amateur radio stations - which are stations operating in the amateur radio service.  
 
Once you tune out of band, you are NOT an "amateur radio station" because you are no longer operating in the Amateur Radio Service.  You are simply an unlicensed pirate station operating illegally in whichever radio service has the frequency you are using.  

For example if you tune your UHF ham radio to 462.6750 you are NOT covered by 97.403/97.405 even if it is in an emergency.  Once you are operating on 462.675 you are NOT an amateur radio station, you are a GMRS station operating at least in violation of 95.129 (and also 95.3 unless you hold a GMRS license).  The applicable emergency rule on 462.6750 happens to be 95.143 (not 97.403 or 97.405) which will not save you.

In the case of tuning your ham radio to a VHF or UHF Public Safety frequency, the emergency rule is 90.407 which certainly won't save you from being prosecuted for violations of 90.203 and 90.20

Even in an actual emergency (IMMEDIATE danger to life) when NO OTHER means of communication are available, out of band operation is still technically illegal, but the 'lesser evil' doctrine of law would be a reasonable defense.  Of course you would have to show that it was an actual emergency and that no legal means of communication was available (including using the ham radio on a ham frequency).

97.403/97.405 will let a Novice use 5KW PEP on the Extra subband, and will let you use phone in the CW subband, and would even allow an unlicensed control operator to operate the licensed ham station (since both sections refer to the station, not the operator) but neither 97.403 nor 97.405 apply outside the ham bands.

EVERY radio service has its own emergency rules.  Many services have a specific emergency rule within the Part that covers the service.  The overall emergency rule is in Part 2, GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, section 405:

2.405  Operation during emergency.

The licensee of any station (except amateur, standard broadcast, FM broadcast, noncommercial educational FM broadcast, or television broadcast) may, during a period of emergency in which normal communication facilities are disrupted as a result of hurricane, flood, earthquake, or similar disaster, utilize such station for emergency communication service in communicating in a manner other than that specified in the instrument of authorization: Provided:

    (a) That as soon as possible after the beginning of such emergency use, notice be sent to the Commission at Washington, D.C., and to the Engineer in Charge of the district in which the station is located, stating the nature of the emergency and the use to which the station is being put, and

    (b) That the emergency use of the station shall be discontinued as soon as substantially normal communication facilities are again available, and

    (c) That the Commission at Washington, D.C., and the Engineer in Charge shall be notified immediately when such special use of the station is terminated: Provided further,

    (d) That in no event shall any station engage in emergency transmission on frequencies other than, or with power in excess of, that specified in the instrument of authorization or as otherwise expressly provided by the Commission, or by law: And provided further,

    (e) That any such emergency communication undertaken under this section shall terminate upon order of the Commission.

    Note: Part 73 of this chapter contains provisions governing emergency operation of standard, FM, noncommercial educational FM, and television broadcast stations. Part 97 of this chapter contains such provisions for amateur stations.
--------------------------------
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KD0DIO
Member

Posts: 3




Ignore
« Reply #34 on: March 21, 2008, 06:05:17 AM »

You for got the most important thing. During life and death situation and or harm to property. You can do whatever means are necessary to communicate you need help. It does not matter what frequency you transmit on. It can be police or fire department frequency. How come non of you mentioned that? Well grow up you all sounds like of bunch of kids.

P>S this site is great.
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KI6ZIF
Member

Posts: 1


WWW

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« Reply #35 on: June 07, 2009, 10:58:44 AM »

http://www.kb2ljj.com/data/yaesu/ft-8900r.htm

Some of you hams forget your roots. If it wasn't for building and modifying in the first place, half of the gear out there wouldn't exist.

Do you want the FCC, to start claiming they need to certify antenna's too?  No more "home brew" di-poles, etc...

Get off your soap box. It's not OUR job to make sure that the person @ the control point is playing legally. Granted we should all be willing to report. But again, the FCC is the governing entity. Not the "general public".

And as stated, In a matter of emergency, even the FCC grants permission to use ANY AVAILABLE COMM TYPE AND FREQ for communication.
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