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Author Topic: Power Supply for Camping Trip  (Read 1979 times)
KD2FAH
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« on: February 28, 2002, 05:54:05 AM »

I have a Realistic HTX-100 10M mobile rig that I would like to work on a camping trip. The rig can be set to use 5 Watts. I am looking for some practical feedback on methods of powering the rig. Ideally I would liked to get 3 hours of up time and don't want to have to rely on my actual car battery, if possible.
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WB2WIK
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« Reply #1 on: March 05, 2002, 01:10:34 PM »

The commonly available 7AH "gel-cell" will power the rig for several hours when running 5W, or about an hour at full power.  Available from a plethora of manufacturers and sources for about $20/each.  I pick mine up at the local Swap Meet for about $5/each (brand new).

A "nicely packaged" 7AH gel-cell, with a plastic case, charging circuitry, multiple outlet connections, a carrying handle, and a front-panel meter to show state of charge is available from all the major amateur radio and electronic retailers for about $49.

WB2WIK/6
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KL7IPV
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« Reply #2 on: March 05, 2002, 11:55:38 PM »

I use a 12VDC 7.5 AHr or 12AHr battery. Look here: www.allelectronics.com
73
Frank
KL7IPV
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KD2FAH
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« Reply #3 on: March 07, 2002, 05:11:50 PM »

I'll take a look at this- thanks!
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KD2FAH
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« Reply #4 on: March 07, 2002, 05:12:15 PM »

I'll check the website out.
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K1CJS
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« Reply #5 on: March 16, 2002, 03:46:18 PM »

   I use a homemade power pack which consists of two garden tractor type deep-cycle batteries in a plexiglas lined wooden carry case.  The charge lasts a long time, even with powering a 12 volt light as well as my radios.    
   To recharge, I would just plug the pack into the cigarette lighter in the car or use a small automotive battery charger.
   If you're careful in your design, the tipover danger from the battery electrolyte is minimal, the cost is lower than for gel-cell type batteries (and the reserve is greater) and you can draw more power from the batteries without damaging them.
   Gel cells are usually preferred because of the lack of liquid electrolyte, but these small batteries can be used with the proper cautions taken.
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KF4ZGZ
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« Reply #6 on: March 18, 2002, 06:16:11 AM »

Quick and easy. I use one of the emergency "jump start" units for a car. It has an 18 ah battery, a built in chargerwhich you can leave plugged in all the time,two taps for different power requirements, and a cig. lighter plug. It's easy to handle...a handle is built in, and in an emergency, the thing really has a lot of cranking power!
73 es Good Luck de Matt, KF4ZGZ
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KD2FAH
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« Reply #7 on: March 19, 2002, 08:00:33 PM »

I just got a hold of sealed rechargeable batteries that were from two APC UPS-1400. They are two sets of 4 seperate batteries. One set reads 12V, 7.0AH and the other set reads 12V, 7.2AH/20HR. I have a 25-watt/5-watt rig that I would like to try on these two bricks but wanted some feedback, thoughts, comments before I did.
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K1CJS
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« Reply #8 on: March 20, 2002, 06:40:39 PM »

Much depends on where there batteries came from and how old they are.  Were those two UPS units discarded?  If they were it is probably because those batteries were at the end of their useful life, and won't hold a charge as long as newer batteries will.  When my company replaced gel-cells in alarm panels, (approx 7 AH batteries) it was because the alarm panels would lose power after 3 to 4 hours.  Average draw on standby was perhaps 300 to 400 ma.
A new battery would power the panels for over 30 hours before losing power.

Those batteries will probably work well for receiving and
intermittant 5 watt transmitting, but trying to run the rig for a prolonged period will result on such a voltage drop when you try to transmit, the rig will probably not transmit--and you may even damage it.

I'd be very careful using then and keep constant watch on the voltage level with digital voltmeter -- look at the voltage reading when you key the rig, not while you're receiving.  Good luck!
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K1CJS
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« Reply #9 on: March 20, 2002, 06:43:27 PM »

Re:  My last post
I forgot to mention--the batteries in the alarm panels were 5 to 7 years old.
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