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Author Topic: new QRP op  (Read 1077 times)
N4UE
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Posts: 300




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« on: August 29, 2002, 11:43:53 AM »

Hi, I am interested in starting QRP from my new location. I will be using vintage receivers, so I want a transmitter only. CW only.
Can't seem to find many ads in the ham magazines. I know the ARRL has some books on the subject and I'll be getting those when I return from an upcoming trip.
Since this is my first time here, please, no responses about 'this has been beaten to death'. Not by me.....

Any recommendations? Kits OK, actually prefered, but what's out there?

thanks

ron
N4UE
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WB6BYU
Member

Posts: 13580




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« Reply #1 on: September 04, 2002, 04:38:21 PM »

The QRP-ARCI web site has a whole list of kit suppliers. Dan's
Small Parts and Kanga both sell kits, and FAR Circuits has circuit
boards for many rigs that have been described in the magazines
over the years.  The W1FB QRP Notebook and "Solid State Design
for the Radio Amateur" have lots of different designs.

On the other hand, if you are going to use vintage eqiupment,
you may want to use "glow-FETs" instead of transistors.  A 6AQ5
or 6V6 or 2E26 will give plenty of output for QRP.  A single tube
crystal oscillator is quite simple, though adding a VFO may give
much more flexibility.  The ARRL's book, "How to Become a Radio
Amateur" has contained a number of simple transmitter designs
over the years, including my first 6DQ6 rig from many years back.
(This was my first exercise in QRP, though I didn't know it at the
time.  Because the antenna didn't match, I was running about 25
watts DC input, and getting about 2 watts output to the antenna.)

Another good reference book is "Amateur Radio Techniques" from
the RSGB.  Now out of print, but you can occasionally find used
copies.
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N4UE
Member

Posts: 300




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« Reply #2 on: September 18, 2002, 06:47:04 PM »

Thanks for the information. I do (I really do) like to build equipment. However, I am in the process of building a new house and detached shop/shack. Another project would be too much right now. I have been looking at the Vectronics kits. For the $, they seem to offer the most features. I thought (what a mistake) that there would be plenty of Heathkit and Knight Kit AM-CW transimtters available at giveaway prices. Most are fetching big $ on the dreaded "E-pay".... I wanted something that had t/r switching built-in. I do have a spare Drake TR4-C and P/S but that ain't the same. I guess I'll check out the info you gave me, in addition to keeping my eyes peeled at the upcoming hamfests.

73

ron
N4UE
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WB6BYU
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Posts: 13580




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« Reply #3 on: September 19, 2002, 03:39:53 PM »

For a single-band transmitter, I'd look at the Ten-Tec
kits.  For 80 or 40m with crystal control, check out
the "Pippin" transmiter circuit on G3PTO's web page.  
It is quite simple and cheap, easily built with point-
to-point wireing, and runs about 1 watt output.  I've
built several for 80m using junkbox transistors.

You can often find an old Heathkit DX-60 or DX-35 at
a hamfest.   (It may be best to build your own solid-
state VFO for it, as the old ones weren't the ultimate
in stability...)  But a lot of the old rigs have been
junked or converted to CB, or the prices are being
driven up by older hams trying to recreate their
original station.

Bud Larsen, W7LNG, sells a simple crystal-controlled
QRP tube transmitter kit that was covered in the last
issue of Worldradio magazine.
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