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Author Topic: Why do you operate QRP ?  (Read 1878 times)
AK0B
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Posts: 25




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« on: September 20, 2007, 07:07:23 AM »

Why do you operate QRP?   Fair question?    Perhaps the question should be Do you operate QRP or just build QRP kits?     It seems a lot of kits are built, but very few original designs are created.    Note almost the total absence of receiver designs.

Also there appears to be a lacking in use of digital modes to make DX low power contacts.

The digital modes are perfect for working the world with under 100 milliwatts, but do not see many attempts even at the five watt level to do so.     Digital mode programs such as JT-65A, MT-63 and Olivia all allow world wide communications even on 80 meters.   However, do not see any serious activity by QRP advocates to do so.

While there is considerable activity around 7040/7030 CW for the most part other bands appeared to be ignored.    

Something to ponder.

Cheers, Stan ak0b
   
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W5ESE
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Posts: 550


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« Reply #1 on: September 20, 2007, 07:21:16 AM »

> Why do you operate QRP?

Because it's fun.

And I'm a backpacker, and QRP is the only
reasonable option for operating on wilderness
treks.

I think some of the original design articles have
moved to QEX, that used to appear in QST. I wish
it were otherwise. Some good articles on regens
were in QEX within the last few months.

> Also there appears to be a lacking in use of
> digital modes to make DX low power contacts.

I work with computers all day long. When I'm
away from work, it's refreshing to tap out some
CW.

I'm sure many others are similarly situated.

73
Scott
W5ESE
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KE3WD
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Posts: 5694




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« Reply #2 on: September 20, 2007, 10:39:39 AM »

In my case it is because I'm an avid CW op, have operated many years at all power levels BUT QRP until about 8 years ago.  

One day I decided to turn my exciter as far down as it would go, which was "around" the 5W level, and answer a guy calling CQ QRP in the QRP slot of 40.  Had a ball, kept it up, built some real QRP rigs, bought some others.  

I still run CW QRO also, but there are times when the joy of QRP CW is something I dig.  When the cycle comes back, I intend to enjoy QRPp again, too!  

All of my QRP experience is CW, though.  Wouldn't have it any other way.  


KE3WD
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W8ZNX
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Posts: 1




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« Reply #3 on: September 20, 2007, 01:10:06 PM »

its fun
its handy
its cheap
you can still build your own gear
either from scratch or from kits
its real ham radio

" the last real ham will be a qrp op "

to me
the thril of working dx
running 100 watts or more
passed over 35 years ago

work a G3 on 80 cw, running 100 watts
its just another contact
nothing to get excited about

work the same G3 running a 4 watt
rock bound, home brew, glow bug
build from a 1941 QST article

or a solid state rig
you built from Doug DeMaw's QRP Notebook
wow ------------ worked a G3
with a rig, you made with your own two hands

will not get that kind of thrill
running a " Belch Fire 3K Ultra Pro Mark IV "
that you bought from AES for $7,000
 
mac dit dit



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W3JJH
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Posts: 1422


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« Reply #4 on: September 21, 2007, 02:32:40 PM »

There are 3 reason why I often operate QRP:

1.  I enjoy the challenge.

2.  I operate while camping--batteries don't last long running a QRO rig.

3. FCC Rule 97.313  Transmitter power standards. (a) An amateur station must use the minimum transmitter power necessary to carry out the desired communications.
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HA6SST
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Posts: 110




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« Reply #5 on: September 22, 2007, 05:35:38 AM »

Horrible TVI problems. Hungary still has a TV service on 50 MHz and a lot of the TV sets are very old. If I transmit more than 15W on any HF band my neighbors start banging on my front door.

HA6SST
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ONAIR
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Posts: 1732




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« Reply #6 on: September 22, 2007, 06:18:39 PM »

    It makes me feel like the original hams must have felt in the early 1900s, contacting those far off barely readable stations way out in the distance while they were using just a few lousy watts!  Not to mention the great feeling of helping the planet by reducing electric use, fossil fuel consumption, and greenhouse gases!
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AA1IK
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Posts: 8




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« Reply #7 on: September 22, 2007, 06:27:41 PM »

I operate QRP portable. Its a Field Day op every time I go out.

I use a fishing pole to zing a sinker over a tree limb and pull up the antenna on a rope after I pull that over the limb with the fishing reel.

When the bands are good I stay for a few hours.

If not, I go home in an hour or so and reward my efforts with a cup of hot tea. I make tea at the park and drink it while operating if condx are good.

This year I hooked up a computer for logging and sending CW. Its fun and I make fewer mistakes while typing than if I used paddles.

Tendonitis prevents me from holding my wrist still for very long. Typing does not seem to bother me, while the paddles do.

A spare battery for the computer and a portable converter makes lots of power for the laptop. The rig is a ic 703, uses very little power. I poop out before the rig battery does.

Chatting on the air, es with people who think tree fishing is wierd and kids who are curious about radio is fun.

Yep, QRP IS GOOD!

Some times dx is only a mile away, es sometime its JA1
who knows?

de AA1IK/P

Ernie Gregoire
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W2RDD
Member

Posts: 191




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« Reply #8 on: September 23, 2007, 04:23:20 AM »

I don't have much to add. The earlier comments were spot on. I couldn't improve upon them. They echo my own feelings.

I especially liked one observation. That of having the same sense of wonder that an early twentieth century radio operator might have had making a contact under difficult conditions.

I only wish more QRP operators would tag their calls with "QRP" so we could recognize each other. At least on the QRP calling frequencies. I know that procedure is not really approved of, recently.

We really have to keep our operating spirits up during these difficult times, propagation-wise. And, listen long and hard. It isn't going to be easy for quite a while, yet.

73 and stay true to QRP.





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AA5TB
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« Reply #9 on: September 30, 2007, 07:45:56 AM »

Why do I operate CW QRP?

Because it is fun.

Why don't I operate more digital QRP?

Because it is not as much fun (for me).  I sometimes operate PSK31 QRP but the fun runs out after about a day. A few months later I do it again.

73,
Steve - AA5TB
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KT8K
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Posts: 1490




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« Reply #10 on: October 05, 2007, 07:53:09 AM »

When I work the Galapagos in a contest, or a VK at twilight time on 40m, or anything like that using my 5 watts & wires/verticals ... what a thrill!  I hope I never get tired of it.  I love it so much that about 99.9% of my HF Q's (and less than a dozen out of 8800 in the past 5 years) were made with 5 watts or less.
Long live QRP!  Long live CW!
Best rx to all de kt8k - Tim
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K8AG
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Posts: 345




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« Reply #11 on: October 05, 2007, 09:32:44 AM »

I believe that the lure of amateur radio is not making the contact, but how the contact is made that is important and impressive.  If I wanted to make the contact every time I can do it much more effectively just picking up a cell phone and calling.  And its a whole lot cheaper than an amp, tower, rotor etc.

I get a kick out of getting a 559 report from someone in Texas when I am running a watt or so.  I think it is amazing to witness the marvelous design of a receiver and the skill of an operator that can pull out a little signal from hundreds or thousands of miles away.

My 2 cents.

73, JP, K8AG
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KI4PRK
Member

Posts: 81




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« Reply #12 on: October 26, 2007, 02:37:56 PM »

Mainly because it's something to do when the DX is down Tongue Also I enjoy the challenge, plus building my own kits. Also, though in the past I haven't operated portable at all, now that I've gotten into microwaves I can ONLY operate portable (with microwaves) so when there is no activity I will be able to switch on my QRP rig and work - the - world! It was especially great working JY4NE running 1 watt from 4U1WRC here. 73, de Brennen KI4PRK age 13 P.S. has anyone ever noticed how much quieter and more sensitive a QRP kit radio (in my case a 40M MFJ Cub) seems to be than, say, and ICOM 706?
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NI3B
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« Reply #13 on: November 22, 2007, 07:55:24 AM »

I've always been interested in electronics. One of the main reasons why I became a ham in 1990 was to build, design and experiment with electronics, especially RF design.

Simple low power CW transmitters can be designed and built with a minimal amount of components.

Over the years I have built many QRP projects. Most have been my own design. Some have been laughable and quickly retires while others have been very surprising.

I still operate QRO but I enjoy circuit building and experimenting.

I also enjoy portable operation. My main portable setup includes a NC-40A, a simple tuner, and a Norcal Doublet antenna.

Best,
Brian
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W6YDE
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Posts: 5




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« Reply #14 on: November 25, 2007, 04:23:10 PM »

Now anyone can make a contact with 5KW, try it with 5 watts or less.  Now make a contact with 3B7C, I did.  I sat on 7.002 for over 4 hours and waited for them to call their first CQ. I answered their first call, received a ? and had a return contact on my second call.  Yes I used my 4 element 40 meter beam at 4,000 feet, BUT I was using only 4.6 watts from a KX1. NOW THAT'S QRP EXCITEMENT!
73, Mike/W6YDE
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