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Author Topic: Good simple QRP receiver homebrew  (Read 7059 times)
W2DAB
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« on: January 14, 2008, 04:12:16 PM »

I am looking for recommendations for a good QRP receiver to build as a first project.

I do have some experience with electronics and would prefer brewing my own as opposed to a kit.

Does anyone know of a good basic receiver plan with circuit diagrams, maybe an eagle file for a board, a clear parts list with source for buying and clear directions.

I know I am asking for alot and maybe I can contribute a clear set once I know how, but many docs are very rough, especially circuit diagrams that are hand drawn and very hard to follow.

Thanks in advance and 73

David

W0DAB
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AG4RQ
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« Reply #1 on: January 14, 2008, 05:12:59 PM »

Try one or more of these:

The MRX-40 Mini Receiver
http://www.arrl.org/tis/info/pdf/99759.pdf

Neophyte Receiver
http://www.arrl.org/tis/info/pdf/28814.pdf

Ramsey 40m receiver
http://www.cqham.ru/projects/ramseyrx.jpg
(L1 and L2 are 10.7 MHz IF transformers)
The manual for the Ramsey receiver can be downloaded at
http://www.ramseyelectronics.com/downloads/manuals/HR40.pdf

Also, Google homebrew qrp receiver and you will find many others.

73 de Mark
AG4RQ
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WB8YYY
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« Reply #2 on: January 15, 2008, 09:07:48 AM »

First, summarize your requirements for yourself.  if this is a receiver you will hope to use after your build it, i would suggest a superhet design.  

determine band(s) of operation.  

determine you most critical parts.  crystals for the CW filter, torroids or other inductor forms, solid state devices.  

look at others work.  hint - the 2n2/40 makes excellent use of mostly modest components in its receiver, and you just may want to expand it into a transceiver.  T/R switch integration is a factor that has turned me off considering separate Rx and Tx.  

decide what circuits you wish to breadboard and/or analyze with a Spice based program.  proceed with some care in integrating circuits from various projects.  many designers will answer your questions with great interest.  
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W3JJH
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« Reply #3 on: January 16, 2008, 09:51:35 AM »

WB8Ycubed offers good advice on the basic approach one should take to homebrew design.

I suggest that you get some good references that show how others have approached the problem.  Doug DeMaw's book, "W1FB's QRP Notes" is good place to start.  The Radio Society of Great Britain publishes the "RSGB Radio Communication Handbook" which is full of designs that can be cloned or copied.  The book includes some useable PC layouts.  Both of these books are available from the ARRL and can be ordered on line.
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W2XS
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« Reply #4 on: January 17, 2008, 04:04:16 PM »

I don't know if you want a kit or not, but I might recommend a simple superhet design. I built several direct conversion receivers in the past and always came back to the superhet.

The SWL-40+ is a transceiver but it is very high performance for $55. You could build just the receiver section only if that's all you want.

Dan's Small Parts sells "The Traveller" kit which appeared in 73 several years ago. This is for 80m but I am sure it could cover other bands with some changes. This is from Dan's web site.

THE TRAVELER 80 METER SSB/CW RECEIVER KIT

This is a very nice 80 meter ssb/cw home-brew receiver
designed by Paul G Daulton..featured in Oct. 1994 issue of 73 Amateur Radio Today. This is a simple, hi-performance, 80 Meter SSB/CW receiver designed around the Motorola MC3362P IC CHIP. The receiver is a true single-sideband superhetrodyne, with a 3 crystal filter and also a crystal controlled vfo..very nice receiver kit. Kit includes a nice silk screened etched circuit board and all board mounted components and also the vol. pot and the 10 turn tuning pot.

Price on this very nice receiver kit is $39.95

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AB9LZ
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« Reply #5 on: January 27, 2008, 01:23:33 PM »

http://www.qrp.pops.net/popsuphet.asp

I've made two of these (one used an MC-1350 as the second IF amp and has an agc loop) they perform as well as my K2, which isn't surprising since the general design is about the same.

The simple NE-602 LM-386 two chip DC receivers (like the Ramsey design) are almost unusable in real world conditions.

Ocean State electronics is a good source for parts, they carry everything, toroids, minicircuits mixers, analog chips (ike the 1350) etc.

73 m/4
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AK2B
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« Reply #6 on: February 01, 2008, 10:44:58 AM »

If you have a desire to build I would first pick up a copy of Experimental Methods in RF Design from <http://www.arrl.org/catalog/?item=8799>. My advice is to start small and work your way up. A good, inexpensive kit is the DC40/20 from QRPkits <http://www.qrpkits.com/dc40a.html> It is a very interesting design of a transceiver with a dc receiver. I recently built a DC receiver from the <http://www.qrp.pops.net/> website. There are tons of really good sites for construction projects, a lot of them from QRP clubs like NorCal or NJQRP. Building is a great deal of fun and there is no feeling better than having a QSO with something you built yourself.

Tom, AK2B
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