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Author Topic: iss voice repeater  (Read 915 times)
EI2GLB
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« on: January 03, 2006, 08:30:34 PM »

i have been listening to iss lately but its allways seems to be in packet mode when does the voice repeater be turned on i have only heard it once.
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WD9EWK
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« Reply #1 on: January 07, 2006, 11:19:37 PM »

The ISS cross-band repeater was on during the week between Christmas and New Year's Day as an experiment.  Due to PCSAT2 being on the outside of the ISS and in operation, the cross-band repeater has seen little activity.  It was also on in late July.  Now it will be back to packet, with the occasional voice activity from the ISS crew (mostly Bill McArthur as NA1SS, but sometimes Valery Tokarev will take the mic as RS0ISS).  

If you want to make a QSO with the crew, look for them on their lunch time (around 1200-1300 UTC, give or take) or after their workday ends before going to bed (generally between 1900-2100 UTC, although Bill McArthur is sometimes on after 2100 UTC on weekends).  He had been active over Europe in the past week since there were passes that fell in the end-of-day (on the ISS) timeframe.  Now those passes are coming over North America again, and we'll hopefully get another chance to talk with the ISS.  If there is voice activity on a pass over North America, it might continue as the station heads across the Atlantic toward Europe.  

Are you familiar with www.issfanclub.com - a site where (among other things) there is a section where people can post recent activity on there for anyone to see?  Another site is www.ariss.net - with APRS data that was digipeated through the ISS.  If there isn't activity showing up on there from North America, the crew could be on the mic - and could stay on the mic while passing over Europe.  Just a couple of tools to keep in mind if you're trying to snag a contact with the ISS crew.

73!


Patrick WD9EWK/VA7EWK - Phoenix, Arizona USA
http://www.wd9ewk.net/
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Patrick WD9EWK/VA7EWK
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N0MUD
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« Reply #2 on: January 11, 2006, 06:57:33 AM »

They were on voice this last Sunday and Saturday afternoons, Jan 7 & 8.  A bunch of us Colorado Hams did hear them as they was passing over the Dakotas.  The ISS crew was calling CQ for either of the Dakotas so I guess that's what they need for WAS award.  Anyways go to the AMSAT site and you can find their track and see when they are over the US and can try to call them but remember they are simplex.  Good luck in trying to contact them.  I am just starting to get my SAT antennas in already have the SAT rotor so hoping to get it set up soon so I can track them better.

Good luck Hammin...

73's N├śmud
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WD9EWK
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« Reply #3 on: January 11, 2006, 09:13:37 AM »

Hi!

N0MUD said:

"They were on voice this last Sunday and Saturday afternoons, Jan 7 & 8. A bunch of us Colorado Hams did hear them as they was passing over the Dakotas. The ISS crew was calling CQ for either of the Dakotas so I guess that's what they need for WAS award. "
 
Bill McArthur, the American currently on the ISS, was trying to work all 50 states.  He got up to 48 last weekend, then got Missouri, and only needs Alaska to make all 50.  Then he also needs to receive the QSLs from all 50 states.  
 
One more thing from the previous comment...
 
"Anyways go to the AMSAT site and you can find their track and see when they are over the US and can try to call them but remember they are simplex."

The first part is correct; the AMSAT web site will provide pass predictions for the ISS and other ham satellites.  Put in either your grid or latitude/longitude, select the satellite/ISS and number of passes (10 to 50), and it will display the information.  Along with that, you can also get to a map showing the satellite you selected (or ISS) and the next couple of passes.  Nice feature!
 
They are normally *not* operating simplex.  If on 2m voice, they work split-frequency.... always listen on 145.800; transmit up to the ISS on 145.200 if in Europe, Africa, or Russia; transmit on 144.490 if in the rest of the world (including North America).  
 
On 14-15 January, they will be on simplex, but on 70cm UHF.  Due to the Doppler effect, you'll have to essentially program your radio to work split-frequency or use 2 VFOs with different TX/RX frequencies.  Kenneth Ransom N5VHO posted this chart to the AMSAT "SAREX" list of suggested memory channels to use if your radio can tune in 5 kHz steps for this weekend:
 
Mem.     TX    -    RX
Ch A - 437.540 - 437.560  Acquisition of signal (AOS)
Ch B - 437.545 - 437.555
Ch C - 437.550 - 437.550  Time of closest approach (TCA)
Ch D - 437.555 - 437.545
Ch E - 437.560 - 437.540  Loss of signal (LOS)

At the middle of the pass, you are operating simplex, but for the other parts of the pass split-frequency operation is mandatory.  The ISS radio will only have 437.550 on it, and ground stations will need to make all the adjustments for Doppler.  
 
Good luck and 73!
 
 
Patrick WD9EWK/VA7EWK - Phoenix AZ
http://www.wd9ewk.net/
 
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Patrick WD9EWK/VA7EWK
http://www.wd9ewk.net/
W3LK
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« Reply #4 on: January 12, 2006, 08:51:05 AM »

<< The ISS crew was calling CQ for either of the Dakotas so I guess that's what they need for WAS award.>>

Interesting. Unless the ARRL changes the rules and creates an award for working WAS from an orbiting spacecraft, they can't earn WAS. The rules state you have to work all the states from within a 50 mile radius of your location.

Lon
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A smoking section in a restaurant makes as much sense as a peeing section in a swimming pool.
WD9EWK
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« Reply #5 on: January 12, 2006, 09:46:17 PM »

The normal WAS award has that 50-mile limitation, but the ARRL will
issue a special version of that award if Bill McArthur makes the
QSOs and gets the cards.  As of now, he only needs to work Alaska
to have QSOs with all the states.  Same with DXCC, if he can get
the cards for contacts with 100 or more entities on the ARRL DXCC
list.  Even though Bill has the advantage of flying over much
of the world, he still has to work around his schedule and get
on the radio to make the contacts.  

Bill already has enough for the WAC award, and he also worked
Antarctica to have contacts with all 7 continents, and since he
did that on 2m he will make a run at doing that on 70cm this
coming weekend (14-15 January).  He will be on 437.550 simplex, but
we on the ground have to adjust both transmit and receive to
deal with Doppler.  
 
73!
 
 
Patrick WD9EWK/VA7EWK - Phoenix AZ
http://www.wd9ewk.net/
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Patrick WD9EWK/VA7EWK
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EI5FK
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« Reply #6 on: January 21, 2006, 04:38:55 PM »

Bill is qrv on voice for sure, I worked him 3 times on voice on 2m and once on 70cms in past 2 weeks
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