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Author Topic: ICOM IC-7300  (Read 90053 times)
N2DTS
Member

Posts: 192




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« Reply #285 on: June 25, 2016, 08:23:32 PM »

What is the big deal with a calibrated S meter?
You have the radio hooked up to an antenna, with coax, and no two are equal.
Low dipole, high dipole, beam, G5RV, and about 100 other types of antenna/feedline setups over various grounds and near field objects and a calibrated S meter is important ?
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KK5DR
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Posts: 561


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« Reply #286 on: Yesterday at 12:17:58 PM »

Calibrated S-meters, don't exist. There is no such thing.
Each radio manufacture selects a signal level to calibrate the meter.
ICOM, selected the level of 50uV at 14mhz as equal to S-9. There is NO industry standard. However, it is generally accepted that each S meter division is roughly equal to 6dB.
Outside of these, it's all relative, dependent on a large number of installation variables.
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W3PH
Member

Posts: 53




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« Reply #287 on: Yesterday at 04:19:23 PM »

Calibrated S-meters, don't exist. There is no such thing.
Each radio manufacture selects a signal level to calibrate the meter.
ICOM, selected the level of 50uV at 14mhz as equal to S-9. There is NO industry standard. However, it is generally accepted that each S meter division is roughly equal to 6dB.
Outside of these, it's all relative, dependent on a large number of installation variables.

My first receiver was a Command Set RX (BC-454?), no S-Meter.  I give RST reports based on what I hear, not what any meter says - you can tell how loud somebody is without looking.  No calibration needed ;-)
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K7JQ
Member

Posts: 616




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« Reply #288 on: Yesterday at 05:12:36 PM »

Calibrated S-meters, don't exist. There is no such thing.
Each radio manufacture selects a signal level to calibrate the meter.
ICOM, selected the level of 50uV at 14mhz as equal to S-9. There is NO industry standard. However, it is generally accepted that each S meter division is roughly equal to 6dB.
Outside of these, it's all relative, dependent on a large number of installation variables.

My first receiver was a Command Set RX (BC-454?), no S-Meter.  I give RST reports based on what I hear, not what any meter says - you can tell how loud somebody is without looking.  No calibration needed ;-)

The only uses of an S-meter that I can see is:
 1. If a guy wants to know the difference between him being barefoot and throwing his amp on. Or turning his beam. And even those are dependent on propagation and QSB.
 2. If I'm trying to track down the source of some household generated noise.

Other than that, who cares about calibration. Every mfr is different. Try contesting...ever get a report less than 599? Cheesy

73,  Bob K7JQ
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KA4DPO
Member

Posts: 345




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« Reply #289 on: Today at 08:58:45 AM »

Field day results are beginning to trickle in and it looks like the 7300 performs well in multi-op situations.  All of the reports I have read so far say that they did not experience an overload condition even while operating on the same band as another rig in on instance.

 So chalk up another reason to like the little entry level radio that according to some would burst into flames under such conditions. Grin

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