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Author Topic: Transceiver grounding  (Read 4772 times)
JOHNB
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« on: February 23, 2001, 01:36:05 PM »

I'm setting up a new station in a basement room. The radio instructions suggest grounding to a copper pipe with a big honkin' braided strap. The nearest pipe to this room is about 30 feet away, however, the electrical breaker box and a (grounded) telephone connection are within 10 feet. If I ran a 10ga wire up to there, would that suffice?
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K6KAV
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« Reply #1 on: March 24, 2001, 06:26:56 PM »

I WAS TOLD that you should not use the telephone gnd.
hammer in a 8' gnd rod outside the nearest window from your shack. and run #10 wire. if you used the telephone gnd you can feedback though the phone (TVI)
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KA1DBE
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« Reply #2 on: March 29, 2001, 05:53:30 PM »

Also, the "cold water pipe" use to be the way to go many years ago but with all the pvc pipe used in houses today, it is rare to find a water pipe that is grounded.  Go with the ground rod outside the window or just tie all your equipment to a common ground point and use counterpoise wires laid on the floor.  Either way will work.  Good luck

73/72 .-.-.
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N1OCJ
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« Reply #3 on: April 06, 2001, 03:17:02 PM »

I'd like to add a question...

After you get the transceiver grounded to a cold water pipe or ground rod, is it common to tie the ground connection on the back of an antenna tuner to the transceiver ground?

TU
N1OCJ
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K6LO
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« Reply #4 on: April 07, 2001, 11:28:42 AM »

The first goal of your station ground system is to keep all the equipment chassis at the same (earth) potential.  It is difficult for bypass capacitors to do their work when a chassis is floating at 65 volts.  Owners of older hybrid era radios (FT-101 / TS-520) will remember this well.  This prevents audio hum, and other odd behaviour - and of course electric shock.

The second goal is to shunt any stray RF in the radio room to earth.  This is always more nebulous, since, a given ground scheme will present different impedances for different operating frequencies.  Usually, though, if you use a short run to to a good rod, or, even better, a long bare shallow-buried wire, the impedance will be low enough across the H.F. bands to be effective.

If your antenna is located a fair distance from your radio room, then you may not have to worry too much about the most efficient R.F. ground possible, since their may be very little R.F. current straying around the radio room.  If it becomes a problem, and a broadband, low-impedance, R.F. ground is not practical for you, then the counterpoise method works well.

73 - Luke  - K6LO

 

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WI3K
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« Reply #5 on: April 16, 2001, 11:20:21 AM »

I've always tried to install a ground rod through the basement floor as a station ground.  This has worked very well for me.  It keeps the ground path very short and I've never had a problem with TVI or RFI.

If going through the basement floor, it's a good idea to use silicone caulk in and around the hole.  This helps keep any radon gas that may be present from seeping into the room.
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KD7MIR
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« Reply #6 on: April 19, 2001, 12:37:44 PM »

I too would like to ask a question. Here in Rural NV a lot of us are not on a city water system, but we have our own wells. How well do you think it would work to ground the staion to the well. I think my well uses metal pipe all the way (thousands of feet) to the water table. There you would have a huge earth ground right?

73 BJ KD7MIR
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KC7YRN
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« Reply #7 on: October 01, 2001, 05:17:31 PM »

That would be a magnificent DC ground, but for RF the skin effect will limit how deep RF will travel.
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VA7MDI
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« Reply #8 on: January 03, 2002, 03:09:35 AM »

Hi All,

In keeping with the discussion of transceiver grounding, I live on the second floor of our condominium complex and obtaining an earth ground via grounding rods is not possible.

Therefore, I have sought out the cold water pipe in one of our bathrooms and ran about 30' of #10 insulated solid copper wire.  I used a grounding clap to attach the ground lead.  On the other end, I have connected my MFJ-269 SWR analyzer.  Then peeled back the insulator about 5" down and attached to my tuner.  Then about another 5" further down from the end, I attached my transceiver.   Could this result in grounding loops?

Nonetheless, how can I tell if this is a good DC ground?  Is there a way I can measure the effectiveness of this ground?  Although I have no reason to think otherwise, I guess I just want to be sure that this cold water copper pipe isn't attached to some PVC piping somewhere along down the road before reaching the water tank and thereby eliminating the grounding potential.  

Also, I do know that the water tank is located on the main floor.  Assuming it is copper all the way to the tank, will this be an acceptable Dc ground?

Thanks in advance!

--Will
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N4GRF
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« Reply #9 on: November 21, 2012, 02:10:14 PM »

You have a good earth ground (driven rod into the ground) when the voltage difference between your home 120 VAC hot wire (black) and your earth ground is 120 vac. That's evidence the ground is providing a low resistance path for the AC.
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WX7G
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« Reply #10 on: November 21, 2012, 02:31:51 PM »

There is essentially ZERO ground current except during fault conditions.
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