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Author Topic: What rig should I use for a repeater?  (Read 1738 times)
KB9YKG
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Posts: 8


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« on: August 02, 2001, 07:55:21 PM »

I am putting together a 2 meter repeater.  I have most of the equipment already.  This includes a good power supply, back up power system, coax cable, antenna, duplexer, antenna, and repeater controller.  All I really need is 2 mobile rigs to complete the repeater.  I could use some suggestions on what rigs to use.  I obviously need something very reliable, but I would also like a rig that has the ability to transmit at 40-50 watts, and if possible something that has a +vcc rx output to key the controller.  If that is not available, its okay, I can build something that will take care of that.  Thanks for your time guys.

Andrew Knepler
KB9YKG
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W0JOG
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Posts: 28




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« Reply #1 on: August 03, 2001, 02:22:55 PM »


The only way you will be able to build a really reliable repeater with that much power out as to use commercial components. Used GEs, Motorola and other commerical FM equipment is readily available and up to the task. Contact a local two-way shop or prowl the web and you'll find some. I know K0JXI in Memphis, Tenn (dwmcgraw@bellsouth.com) just picked up more than 25 used GE solid state commercial rigs that likely can be purchased for less than some ham two meter rig would cost you.

73 es good luck.

Vern M. W0JOG
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« Reply #2 on: August 03, 2001, 10:34:39 PM »

Hi,

Which commercial rigs (make/model) are the best
choice for conversion to ham band repeater use ?

73
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K0XM
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Posts: 7




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« Reply #3 on: August 05, 2001, 08:43:04 AM »

A "normal" ham band rig has too wide of a front end for repeater service. I would see about getting a commercial (GE, or Motorola) mobile and do the conversion. A couple of GOOD web pages are http://www.seits.org or http://www.kuggie.com
Remember, if you are using a set of duplexers don't skimp on them. They can make or break a rptr. It makes no sense to put on a hi-powered rptr if you have to stand right under it to use it. Good Luck, and let me know if I can help.
Chuck/K0XM
trustee WR0BPU
442.55 rptr
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K0XM
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Posts: 7




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« Reply #4 on: August 17, 2001, 07:14:56 PM »

Motorola Micors are the most common. I have seen Mocom 70 used in rptr service, and also Mitreks. GE Mastr line are VERY common. Now if you are looking for 222 Mhz, then we are in a WHOLE other ballgame. There are some mods on the web to convert Motorola to 222, but overall equipment is scare for homebrewers. Most of the 222 stuff is Spectrum, Hamtronics (I have never had any good luck with them),and Icom.
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K7JEM
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Posts: 2




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« Reply #5 on: August 28, 2001, 02:38:35 PM »

The Motorola Micor mobile radio can be easily converted to repeater operation, as well as the GE MastrII. Either of these radios can be had for under $50, if you look around. The Micor repeater stations and GE MastrII repeater stations are starting to become available at reasonable prices too. These typically run in the $200-$500 range.

Any of these radios can be found on e-bay, however a local radio shop might have some laying around.

Joe
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N3IVK
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Posts: 26




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« Reply #6 on: September 10, 2001, 01:16:34 AM »

The 16 Pin Motorola GM300's make a nice setup, but with a 45 watt radio, you'd want to derate the power on it for cont duty, set if for about 25 watts if it's a 45 watt radio.  The 16 pin models are just waiting to be made into repeaters.

The Micor is a good rig, just a hassle with crystals.
The Micor prob has the best squelch circut in the repeater feild.

For your power level, you would want a 110 Watt trunk mount commercial radio.  Cut the power back to keep from melting the thing. I have a Motorola SyntorX9000 in my Caprice and with 110 Watts on VHF yacking all the time, it barely gets warm. You may get away with 75 Watts on it with a fan.

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RAD1OMAN
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« Reply #7 on: September 16, 2001, 08:21:15 PM »

if I were building another repeater, I would use a GE MASTRII. follow this link and you can see why.
http://www.nhrc.net/mastr2/
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KK9H
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Posts: 18




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« Reply #8 on: January 02, 2002, 04:08:28 PM »

Our club has used Icom repeaters successfully for a number of years. We have a 2M RP-1520 and a UHF RP-4020 for 440 MHz. The Yaesu Vertex series are excellent units too.
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9H1PA
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Posts: 2




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« Reply #9 on: April 16, 2002, 04:57:41 PM »

We have installed a RP-1520 with Waycom Duplexer . The insertion loss of the Duplexer is 1.5 db.
It looks like the TX side of the Repeater is a bit better than the RX side . Would a pre-amp on the RX
help to over come the insertion loss of the Duplexer?. We are using a Diamond 6.5dB colinear .
Coax loss is 1dB .I was thinking maybe of a 10 dB pre-amp . Any help would be useful .
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