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Author Topic: Attic to Living room.........  (Read 1247 times)
KL0EU
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Posts: 12




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« on: April 07, 2003, 01:14:25 PM »

I read the post on feed line entry but none of those options seem viable to me.....I have a TV ant. on a mast that is no longer used....I thought about the plexiglass in the window but abandoned that for two reasons. First, the safety issue easy to punch out and break in.  Second, it is not close to the living room.  Another option I thought of was placing the ant. in the attic and running a line down through the living room.  We are in a rent house so punching a hole in the ceiling doesnt seem to bright of an idea unless it can be done in a small inconspicuous area....Thought you guys might have an idea?

Jason
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N5CTI
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Posts: 69




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« Reply #1 on: April 07, 2003, 03:56:25 PM »

I would think that it's harder to punch out plexiglas than it would be to break some glass panes. Depending on how creative you want to get, and how industrious you are, you could even replace a glass pane with a plexiglass pane. I can't see where you'd be any worse off from a safety perspective.

73,

Boyd / N5CTI
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KL0EU
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« Reply #2 on: April 07, 2003, 04:36:04 PM »

Boyd.Thank you for the reply.  And After I get it into the house....the wire comes along in the attic to the living room....how do I drop it into the living room with out punching holes in the walls.....Remember we are in a rent house.

Jason
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W5CPT
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« Reply #3 on: April 08, 2003, 10:23:51 AM »

One way to get wires into a room from the attic above is from a closet.  If there is a closet off the room into which you want to install radios, go through the ceiling in the closet.  Most closet doors do not have thresholds so there is room to run quite a few cables under them.  In the attic, to prevent the insulation from falling through the hole I was going to cut, I built a chimney.  From the local Lowes Home Improvement Warehouse, I bought a large (3") PVC flange and a short piece of 3" thin wall pipe (about 16" long). I used PVC cement to attach them together.  I then went into the attic above the closet, cleared away the blown in insulation, and glued the flange to the top of the ceiling.  Then I reached down into the pipe and cut the ceiling away.  This gave me a 3" hole through which I ran antenna and rotor cables.  When we sold the house I never got a chance to patch the hole but the new owners never looked at the ceiling in the closet.  I hope that all made sense.  If not, email me and I will send you some drawings that may make it more understandable.

de Clint
W5CPT
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KT8K
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« Reply #4 on: April 08, 2003, 05:07:21 PM »

In my old house, in the attic I found where the living room wall was by the board along the top of it (kept the insulation from falling down in there).  I drilled a hole in it and dropped my cable down inside the wall.  
In one case I was able to bring the cable down into the basement and then up through a small hole in the floor to my operating position.  In another case I got a small electrical box made for outlets, knocked a hole in the drywall where the cable was dropped, right next to a stud and just big enough to insert the box.  I also got a blank plate to cover the box, drilled it, and mounted a double female UHF connector in it.  I fed the cable through the back of the box, put a PL259 on it, and screwed it tightly onto the double female before mounting the plate to the box.  It looked really professional, and when I moved I removed the cable and put a new blank plate over the box.
In my current house the space between the studs in the living room wall is used as a cold air return, so I dropped the cable down like before and partly unscrewed a cold air register to feed the cable out next to it.  That was even easier.
Good luck es 73 de kt8k - Tim
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N5CTI
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« Reply #5 on: April 09, 2003, 12:24:59 PM »

Tim, you brought up an approach that I've been considering. I've been thinking about cutting a hole in the return-air ducting in my attic and feeding coax through that down to the basement. While I'm sure the metal ducting would put ladderline out of the question, I'm just wondering if well-shielded coax could handle it?

73,

Boyd / N5CTI
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KG4RUL
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« Reply #6 on: April 09, 2003, 01:25:03 PM »

NEVER! Put any kind of cable into an air plenum unless it has "Plenum Rated" insulation.

According to the National Electric Code (NEC) a plenum is a "compartment or chamber to which one or more air ducts are connected and [which] forms part of the air distribution system."

According to the National Electric Code (NEC), in plenum air spaces you must use plenum rated cables, also called Communications Plenum Cable (CMP). Plenum cable is only required when cable is installed in a plenum air space. Materials kept below the ceiling — including speaker wire, computer cables, telephone cords, etc. — do not need to be plenum rated according to the NEC.

Plenum rated coating on wire burns at a much higher temperature and emits fewer fumes.

Remember that even though the National Electric Code may allow non-plenum cable, the final decision is up to your local Fire Marshall. Most cities adopt the national codes as their own without revision, but some cities modify or expand them and require plenum-rated cable in all situations. Regardless of the code or its interpretation, your Fire Marshal makes the final decision. Contact your Fire Marshal if you have questions.

Dennis - KG4RUL
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N5CTI
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« Reply #7 on: April 10, 2003, 12:53:10 PM »

Okay then. How about alongside it on the outside of the plenum? Although I'm not sure if I'll have any luck with that, so I'll have to check how tightly everything is installed.

So what are the realistic hazards that plenum-rated cabling is supposed to minimize? I suppose it's possible that a fire could break out in the furnace, for instance, and then by burning the coax spread into my attic. Seems a stretch, but I'm a layman here.

And then there's the fumes issue. That one feels like it's even more of a stretch than the "fire conductor" one. But hey, I'm not big on putting my family's safety at risk.

73,

Boyd / N5CTI
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KG4RUL
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« Reply #8 on: April 10, 2003, 02:14:33 PM »

The two problems are: Toxic fumes & Fire spreading.

You have to decide what level of risk of these happening you are comfortable with.  Of course, if you use non-plenum rated cable and a fire occurs, your insurance company could refuse to pay all or part of your claims.

Dennis - KG4RUL
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AA8RF
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« Reply #9 on: April 12, 2003, 08:44:35 PM »

Go ahead and put it in the cold air return, it will work great. Just use plenum rated coax so it does not act as fuel for a fire if one gets into the cold air return.

-Jim
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N4NOY
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« Reply #10 on: April 17, 2003, 12:52:22 AM »

I drilled a 1 inch hole in the drywall ceiling. Three feedlines (all coax) run well through it. If the ceiling is white (or if you have the particular color of paint), you can patch the hole once you move out and paint over it.

If you wanted to get particular about the NFPA guidelines, you should plug the remainder of the hole with firestop material of the same time rating as the ceiling (most gypsum is 30 minutes). Further, any cable carrying appreciable current (i.e. anything but twisted pair, audio or cable from a receiving antenna) should be encased in conduit. You can see how someone can get carried away with all this. Creativity mixed with an ample dose of prudence will get you on the air.

See you on the radio...
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N8YAD
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« Reply #11 on: April 22, 2003, 01:54:08 PM »

I also have a 1 inch hole in the ceiling. If you move or need to cover it up for a while, go buy one of those ceiling hooks you hang plants and things from. (has the butterfly type hardware that goes on the other side of the drywall) The base of the hook covers the hole, and the next renters can hang a fern or something. It's easy enough to unscrew the hook, and feed your feed line back through after the landlord is gone!! Take care & 73's  - Ben
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N7PTM
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« Reply #12 on: May 04, 2003, 10:58:27 PM »

How about using a raceway? Raceways are metal or plastic trays that mount to the wall. Cable(s) run inside the raceway, so you'd have to drill a hole in the ceiling probably, but that's easily patched.  Raceways are readily available.

just installed a cellar stairwell light via raceway....
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NN5KS
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« Reply #13 on: May 24, 2003, 10:38:54 PM »

On running feedline between floors:  Mine may be an untenable solution for you, but it worked for me...

I was living a rental house and wanted to run feedline from the attic to the bedroom from which I operated.  My first thought was a small hole in the ceiling or wall of the closet.  Unfortunately, the closet was nicely finished and very well lighted and I could not think of a way to cut into the ceiling without it being rather obvious.  

I only wanted to run one feedline and did so by sacrificing one the wall AC sockets on an inside wall.  I cut power, removed the plate and socket (and stored both) and capped of the AC wires.  I then ran the feedline down the inside of the wall and brought it out through a CATV wall plate.  Since this was an inside wall, it was not insulated.

This socket was mounted in a wallbox but the box had another knockout available for my feedline.  I admit it took a bit of fishing to locate and pull the feedline through but, in the end, it was very much worth it.

When I moved out I simply cut the feedline short, pushed it back up through the knockout in the wallbox and reconnected the AC socket.

The only holes I left were the one in the wallbox and the one I had drilled in the attic to get into the wall.  Both were invisible and harmless.

Regards,
NN5KS
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N6AJR
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« Reply #14 on: July 04, 2003, 03:02:29 AM »

can you drop it through a closet then pull the base board back far enough to run the cable through the wall.  when you move tack the base board back on and the hole goes away.  also, drill a hole in the floor if you have carpet, when you pull the cable out , fluff the carpet, no hole..
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