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Author Topic: Titan DX Vertical HF Ant.  (Read 994 times)
KK6PJ
Member

Posts: 7




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« on: November 06, 2003, 08:04:32 PM »

I am considering purchasing a Gap Antenna Titan Dx.
What can you tell me about your experience with this antenna.  I have to go vertical is there a better vertical on the market?
What is a good height for this antenna?

Thank you in advance
Art
KK6PJ
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W0UCE
Member

Posts: 29


WWW

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« Reply #1 on: November 06, 2003, 10:38:26 PM »

Check out the product reviews on e-ham and other links.  You will likely be discouraged in what you read.

73,
Jack
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N3ZKP
Member

Posts: 2008




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« Reply #2 on: November 07, 2003, 09:33:09 AM »

The Gap antennas are vertical dipoles, and as such don't need a radial system for operation. Reviews are mixed but many people like them. From everything I have read, they perform as well ground mounted as elevated.

I use a Butternut HF6-V and love it, but then I have an extensive ground plane under it - 23k square foot steel roof. Smiley

Lon
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WB2WIK
Member

Posts: 20599




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« Reply #3 on: November 07, 2003, 01:35:38 PM »

I've built, installed and used a number of Titan-DX verticals over the years.  Not bad, not wonderful, but adequate if properly installed.  Very sensitive to surrounding objects and really wants to be installed far away from fences, utility lines, other antennas and anything else that may be conductive.

I like the Hy-Gain AV-640 a tad better.  The HF-9V Butternut is good, but requires an extensive radial system to really do anything.

If you do have room and ambition for an extensive radial system, the Fluid Motion BigIR SteppIR vertical is probably the best thing on the U.S. market currently.  It's not cheap, but easy to build and very lightweight, requiring one light duty set of guy ropes installed about midway up -- but it does require an excellent radial system.  Advantages of the SteppIR vertical include remote tuning to absolute perfect resonance without ever leaving your chair, and probably 100% efficiency on each band (40 through 6 meters, inclusive) since it has no traps, coils, capacitors, matching units or anything that can possibly degrade or dissipate power.

A local friend of mine (WA6DKN) installed the SteppIR vertical (BigIR model) a few months ago and it works extremely well.  He did install 105 radials under it (all laying on the ground), and found that was pretty much required to make it play properly, since he started with only 8 radials (I think) and just kept adding them until adding more didn't improve anything.  I believe he stopped at 105.  You can hear Dave's big signal on many bands, he's very active on 17m, a bit less so on 20m and 40m, etc.

Good luck!

WB2WIK/6

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K0TOM
Member

Posts: 10




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« Reply #4 on: November 20, 2003, 08:25:17 PM »

 I purchased the Titan to replace, my Butternut, and was glad I did.. It works great, no ground radials to mess with, and it is much quieter, on receive..
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N7BUI
Member

Posts: 27




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« Reply #5 on: November 21, 2003, 09:38:06 PM »

Good antenna for 40 meters and upward.  It has 80 meters but is almost worthless for that band.  Yes it will load up on 80, but you might as well forget being heard.  Aside from that particular band, go for it.  Good reports.  
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