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Author Topic: Where to put my station?  (Read 707 times)
KE4MKL
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Posts: 9




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« on: October 29, 2004, 12:41:41 PM »

I'm trying to determine where best to locate my station. I have a good spot on the first floor and a good spot on the second floor. I think my deciding factor is which is best to have: a short distance to ground or a short feedline. Any comments?
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K7JBQ
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Posts: 80




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« Reply #1 on: October 29, 2004, 01:52:29 PM »

What frequencies do you plan on operating?

If VHF/UHF, the shorter feedline is more important.
For HF, if you plan on using an RF ground, the ground floor is best.

Grounding is a subject that has been talked about here ad infinitum. Use the Search feature and resign yourself to mass confusion.

73,
Bill
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OCEANARADIO
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« Reply #2 on: October 31, 2004, 07:43:44 PM »

The decision of where to locate communications equipment should always be based on the shortest distance to ground. At least in lightning-country where you are, that is. Good feedline can easily make up for the short difference in 1 v 2 story location. As the earlier reply offered, that only matters in VHF anyway.

But distance to ground for lightning protection should be measured in INCHES, not feet. Station equipment located on a 2nd floor is difficult to adequately protect if the intention is to leave antennas and AC power connected during storms.

Jack
Virginia Beach VA
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K7PEH
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Posts: 1125




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« Reply #3 on: November 03, 2004, 07:57:01 AM »

Shortest Feedline?

With VHF and above, short feedlines are important but the opposite could be true for HF.

Not that you want the longest feedline but rather you might want to have a feedline that is odd multiples of 1/4 wavelength of your operating frequency.  This puts a voltage anti-node at your transmitter thus if you operate with any SWR at all, your equipment sees the smallest voltages and the best impedence match at the transmitter side (or tuner or amp or whatever).

So, odd multiples of 1/4 wavelength could get long at the lower frequencies.
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N0TONE
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Posts: 173




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« Reply #4 on: December 03, 2004, 12:36:35 PM »

Ground floor, period.  As you build and improve the station, you will be bring more gear in - and that adds weight.  Don't stress your knees by forcing yourself to carry it all upstairs and then back down when you move.

If you are at all an antenna experimenter, you will be putting antennas in the back yard, going inside to check SWR, going back out to make an adjustment....and you don't want to go up and downstairs each time.

The difference in feedline length from second floor to first floor can't be much more than ten feet, and that just won't make much difference on any band.  

For most hams, the more relevant question is how will it impact others in the house. If you plan to use voice modes, your other family members are unlikely to want to hear you talking.  Putting a phone-mode ham station in the same room as the family TV, for instance, is a bad idea.  Which location will provide remaining family members a measure of quiet?

For me, that point is moot - I'm nearly purely CW anyway; headphones and a paddle just aren't that noisy.

AM
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